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I am so confused about multi-thread networking. Since a Socket is an OS Level structure, handling sockets at Erlang BEAM VM level has an equivalent at OS Level, and there are multi options to handle parallel connections by OS-Threads (select, poll, epoll,....) and that depends of the OS but what i can't understand and I searched a lot about without any answer is: If we have 4 Parallel Erlang processes listen to accept connection on one Socket, what is the equivalent at OS Level? 4 waiting Parallel OS-Threads? N Parallel OS-Thread?

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  • You've recently asked multiple variations of essentially the same question. If you're looking for details of the internals of the Erlang virtual machine, my advice is to read The Beam Book. Oct 23 at 11:37
  • Thank you for help, i think that's what i search
    – Michael
    Oct 23 at 20:31
  • sorry but the socket and network chapter is missing
    – Michael
    Oct 24 at 9:16
  • Yes, that's a bit unfortunate. But you can still use the book to learn more about Erlang VM schedulers. I also encourage you to ask questions on Erlang Slack and even build your own debuggable Erlang runtime so you can use a debugger to see what the schedulers are doing. Oct 24 at 14:48
  • all i know about debuggers is that debug your program, it doesn't show internal management, i will try with the Erlang Slack thank you for the link
    – Michael
    Oct 24 at 15:14
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It's a difficult correspondence to draw. Your suggestion 4 Parallel threads is probably the closest equivalent. Things get a bit harder to pin down because a kernel thread will likely take up more system resources than each process. Threads typically share memory space while there is memory protection between processes. So it depends on how far you want to take the simile, but basically there will be 4 separate lines of processing blocked on I/O.

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