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Let's say I have an array:

a =  [0.42, 0.18, 1.54, 2.9, 1.81, 2.35, 0.18, 1.54, 2.92]

which has the following (element-wise) logical state:

[False, True, False, False, False, False, True, False, False]

Is there a nice way to use a list comprehension to only add the True elements to a new list? Additional question: True elements from a shall be popped out afterwards (as they are now already processed)

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  • zip both of them e,g [v for v, state in zip(a, logical_state) if state]. If it's a numpy array you could do a[logical_states]
    – Ch3steR
    Oct 22, 2021 at 7:02

2 Answers 2

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you can do it like this:

>>> a =  [0.42, 0.18, 1.54, 2.9,  1.81, 2.35, 0.18, 1.54, 2.92]
>>> b = [False, True, False, False, False, False,  True, False, False]
>>> c = [num for num, truth_value in zip(a, b) if truth_value]
>>> c
[0.18, 0.18]

Edit: Q- what c = [num for num, truth_value in zip(a, b) if truth_value] this line does ? A- above line is equivalent to following code:

c = list()
for num, truth_value in zip(a, b):
    if truth_value:
        c.append(num)

Q- what is zip() in python? A- you can read about it here

if still anyone wants more explanation to understand just let me know from comments.

2
  • 1
    Works just fine. Regarding my additional question: I guess updating "a" such that now only the previous "False" values remain would require and additonal line with "if not truth_value" condition right? Oct 22, 2021 at 7:39
  • yes you are absolutely right, just don't forget to assign it to "a", kindly consider accepting my answer by clicking on tick mark on my answer so that i can earn reputations , thanks in advance. Oct 22, 2021 at 13:18
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Just to provide an alternative, this can also be done using itertools.compress (Python 3.1 or later). compress(a, b) makes an iterator which provides elements of a whose corresponding element in b evaluates to true.

For example:

>>> a =  [0.42, 0.18, 1.54, 2.9, 1.81, 2.35, 0.18, 1.54, 2.92]
>>> b = [False, True, False, False, False, False, True, False, False]
>>>
>>> c = list(itertools.compress(a, b))
>>> c
[0.18, 0.18]

It would still be necessary to remove those elements from a, either using a list comprehension, or the same technique, but flipping the boolean values, which is somewhat less elegant:

a = list(compress(a, (not x for x in b)))

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