3

I've been practicing on LC where I hit the following issue.

pub fn largest_rectangle_area(heights: Vec<i32>) -> i32 {
    let mut widths = vec![(0usize, heights.len()); heights.len()];
    let mut stack = vec![];

    for (idx, &x) in heights.iter().enumerate() {
        while let Some(&pos) = stack.last() {
            if x >= heights[pos] {
                break;
            }

            widths[pos].1 = idx;
            stack.pop();
        }

        stack.push(idx);
    }

    todo!()
}

error[E0282]: type annotations needed
  --> src/lib.rs:11:13
   |
11 |             widths[pos].1 = idx;
   |             ^^^^^^^^^^^ cannot infer type
   |
   = note: type must be known at this point

What's even stranger is that if I do a widths[pos] = (0, idx); first, then the error disappears:

pub fn largest_rectangle_area(heights: Vec<i32>) -> i32 {
    let mut widths = vec![(0, heights.len()); heights.len()];
    let mut stack = vec![];

    for (idx, &x) in heights.iter().enumerate() {
        while let Some(&pos) = stack.last() {
            if x >= heights[pos] {
                break;
            }

            widths[pos] = (0, idx); // do a full update
            stack.pop();
        }

        stack.push(idx);
    }
    stack.clear();

    for (idx, &x) in heights.iter().enumerate().rev() {
        while let Some(&pos) = stack.last() {
            if x >= heights[pos] {
                break;
            }

            widths[pos].0 = idx + 1; // now it's fine to use `.0`
            stack.pop();
        }

        stack.push(idx);
    }
    todo!()
}

Am I missing something, or is this a bug in the compiler ?

Update

@ Ömer Erden discovered, that it fails to infer the type of pos which should be usize as it's coming from enumerate() indirectly.

It seems pretty strange because it fails to infer the type of pos when doing widths[pos].1 = idx;, but succeeds when doing widths[pos] = (0, idx);

He also managed to create more minimal MCVE:

fn _some_fn() {
    let mut widths = vec![(0usize, 0usize); 100];
    let mut stack = vec![];
    //let mut stack:Vec<usize> = vec![]; //why explicit type definition needed

    let a = stack.pop().unwrap();
    let idx = 0usize;
    widths[a].1 = idx;

    stack.push(idx);
}

Bug Report

https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/issues/90252

6
  • It cannot find the index I type from Index<I> type, if you define your stack as let mut stack:Vec<usize> = vec![]; then it will work, here is the implementation(doc.rust-lang.org/src/alloc/vec/mod.rs.html#2460-2467). It is clear that there is no type declaration for your pos variable , it needs to be a type that implements SliceIndex<_>, in your case it is usize Oct 24, 2021 at 12:56
  • @ÖmerErden thanks, that seems to be the issue. I wonder why it fails to infer that pos is usize in some cases, while it succeeds in others. Oct 24, 2021 at 13:05
  • I checked the code over again, there is still things to consider, this still might be a bug or a limitation. Looks like my comment doesn't cover the whole story since idx is a usize from enumeration, the type of the stack should already inferred via this statement stack.push(idx); Oct 24, 2021 at 13:18
  • Here I've created much more minimal example to express the idea: play.rust-lang.org/… , I assume that the some of the type-inference steps are missing. Oct 24, 2021 at 13:28
  • 1
    @ÖmerErden why compiler is not even aware this needs to be mutable - the explanation for that is that mutability checks come as part of the borrow checking, which is only performed after successful type checking. Since type inference (and with it type checking) failed, borrow check cannot be performed. Oct 25, 2021 at 4:06

1 Answer 1

1

I dont know why the compiler is unable to elide the type, but you can manually annotate it with some easy changes:

pub fn largest_rectangle_area(heights: Vec<i32>) -> i32 {
    let mut widths = vec![(0usize, heights.len()); heights.len()];
    let mut stack = vec![];

    for (idx, &x) in heights.iter().enumerate() {
        while let Some(&pos) = stack.last() {
            if x >= heights[pos] {
                break;
            }
            let at_pos: &mut (usize, usize) = &mut widths[pos];
            at_pos.1 = idx;
            stack.pop();
        }

        stack.push(idx);
    }

    todo!()
}

Playground

2
  • Yeah, but why do I have to add the type here ? If I add the type annotation at the let mut widths: Vec<(usize, usize)> = ... it still complains with the same error. Oct 24, 2021 at 12:59
  • @SvetlinZarev, it looks like a compiler limitation or error. Most probably you could report it since it could be helpful. No harm done anyway since it is easy solvable.
    – Netwave
    Oct 24, 2021 at 13:01

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