54

On the diff man-page I've found these exit values:

    0     No differences were found. 
    1     Differences were found.
   >1     An error occurred.

Are there different exit values above 1 for different errors?

  • 1
    On macOS, the diff man page leaves output values undefined – William Entriken Oct 23 '18 at 1:32
57

It depends on your diff command. Mine (GNU diffutils 3.0) says:

An exit status of 0 means no differences were found, 1 means some differences were found, and 2 means trouble. Normally, differing binary files count as trouble, but this can be altered by using the -a or --text option, or the -q or --brief option.

  • 4
    agreed, I checked the sources, and the only exit codes are EXIT_SUCCESS, EXIT_FAILURE (both defined in stdlib.h) and EXIT_TROUBLE, defined in src/diffutils-3.0/system.h – jcomeau_ictx Aug 7 '11 at 7:26
  • The '--text' option makes a mess of my STDOUT if there are two (big) different binary files. – sid_com Aug 7 '11 at 8:16
  • I'm using GNU diffutils too but quoted the wrong man page. – sid_com Aug 7 '11 at 8:18
  • @sid_com, when your standard output is messed up, try blind-typing echo^V^[c (echo-[control-v]-[escape]-c) or stty sane in your terminal. – Frédéric Hamidi Aug 7 '11 at 8:20
  • @Frédéric Hamidi: messed up in the sense that I have to scroll a lot (when using diff -r). – sid_com Aug 7 '11 at 8:27
7

There maybe, or there may not be different error codes depending upon the version of diff you use. If I remember correctly, the standard BSD diff always returned an exit code of 0, 1, or 2.

However, the manpage isn't mapping out everything that diff might do, but the documentation you can use for using diff command. In a shell script, I want to know if the files matched (exit = 0) or didn't match (exit = 1). However, in my shell script, I also want to know that the diff command itself didn't work.

diff $file1 file2 > /dev/null 2>&1
error=$?
if [ $error -eq 0 ]
then
   echo "$file1 and $file2 are the same file"
elif [ $error -eq 1 ]
then
   echo "$file1 and $file2 differ"
else
   echo "There was something wrong with the diff command"
fi

Imagine if I was told that 2 meant the diff command failed, but a newer version of the diff command made a distinction between a file you can't read (exit = 2) and a missing file (exit = 3). Now, imagine if I did the following in an earlier version of the diff command, but $file2 didn't exist:

diff $file1 file2 > /dev/null 2>&1
error=$?
if [ $error -eq 2 ]
then
   echo "There was something wrong with the diff command"
elif [ $error -eq 1 ]
then
   echo "$file1 and $file2 differ"
else
   echo "$file1 and $file2 are the same file"
fi

In the above code, I checked for the error code of 2 and 1, but not 3. So, instead of detecting a missing file, I assume that the files match.

The manpage is trying to make sure that future upgrades to the OS don't cause most of your shell scripts to suddenly fail. It's why there was a separate awk and nawk command and a separate grep and egrep command.

*Updated as per comment by @chus.

  • 3
    Be careful: $?is updated after executing if [ $? eq 0 ], so the elif evaluation is not related to the diff output. – chus Dec 1 '15 at 9:10
  • 1
    "There [may or may] not be different error codes depending upon the version of diff you use." POSIX diff exits with 0 when files are identical, 1 when they differ, and >1 otherwise. So you can't assume 2, but 0 and 1 are safe. – David Ehrmann Oct 6 '16 at 4:00
  • @chus You're right. I'll update my answer. – David W. Oct 6 '16 at 14:29
  • @DavidEhrmann In the BSD version of the diff command the Mac used when this answer was written, the diff manpage listed the error codes as 0, 1, or 2. The Mac now uses diffutils from GNU, so the error codes in the manpage are now 0, 1, and >1. All Unixdiff commands say that 0 means the files matched and 1 means differences were found. After that, the documentation differs. – David W. Oct 6 '16 at 14:40
  • Unrelated to the topic of diff return values, but there should be a "then" after the "elif" line – L. Scott Johnson Nov 16 '17 at 19:05
3

In my case diff returned 127, searched for it and find it in the tldp.org "Exit Codes With Special Meanings"

127 "command not found" illegal_command Possible problem with $PATH or a typo.

I used an incorrect path to diff. :)

Font: tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/exitcodes.html

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