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Below is my code. It works (yes!), but it requires 3 loops (yikes!). Still new to coding, but I am wondering if there is a more efficient, dryer, or simply better looking way of producing the desired result. The goal is to sum the values for all similar car makes. I then store the values in a hash for each make ({"Honda" => 12400}) and then store the hashes within an array. Not sure if this is the best way to go about it, but assume down the line you will want to access the values depending on the make. I also want to avoid hard coding anything - assume there are 100 different makes. All advice welcome!

    cars = [
  {
    make: "Nissan",
    model: "Model",
    year: 2017,
    value: 5000
  },
  {
    make: "Toyota",
    model: "Corolla",
    year: 1997,
    value: 1000
  },
  {
    make: "Toyota",
    model: "Camry",
    year: 2006,
    value: 3500
  },
  {
  make: "Honda",
  model: "Accord",
  year: 2001,
  value: 5000
  },
  {
    make: "Toyota",
    model: "Tacoma",
    year: 2001,
    value: 2000
  },
  {
    make: "Honda",
    model: "Civic",
    year: 2001,
    value: 1200
  },
  {
    make: "Honda",
    model: "Civic",
    year: 2005,
    value: 2200
  },
  {
    make: "Honda",
    model: "Accord",
    year: 2010,
    value: 4000
  },
  {
    make: "Nissan",
    model: "Altima",
    year: 2017,
    value: 10000
  }
]

#GOAL
#Sum the values for all similar makes and store in an array with a nested hash
# sums_array = [{all_hondas: total_sum}, {all_toyotas: total_sum}]

total_value = 0
car_makes = []
cars.each{|car|
  #creates a hash with a car's make as the key and 0 as the value
  car_hash = {car[:make] => total_value}
  #shovels car_hash into an array if it does not already exist within the array
  unless car_makes.include? car_hash
    car_makes << car_hash
  end
}

values_array = []
car_makes.each {|make|
  make.each {|k, v|
    cars.each{|car|
      if car[:make] == k
        v += car[:value]
      end
    }
    values_array << {k => v}
  }
}

p values_array 

#values_array = [{"Nissan"=>15000}, {"Toyota"=>6500},{"Honda"=>12400}]
11
  • It's not clear why you can't iterate the array and increment a hash keyed by make with a running total value in a single loop. Oct 26, 2021 at 15:37
  • 1
    What makes a make "similar"? I.e. how do you decide whether two hash keys are "similar"? Oct 26, 2021 at 15:45
  • @JörgWMittag I guess better phrasing would be "if they are the same". make => "honda" is the same as make => "honda" but different than make => "nissan". Does that make sense?
    – codian
    Oct 26, 2021 at 15:50
  • Why would you want an array of the hashes instead of a hash of all the makes and totals? If you need to look one up, are you going to iterate through the array looking for the one with the correct hash key? This defeats the purpose of using a hash, doesn't it? Oct 26, 2021 at 15:52
  • @DaveNewton I am not sure I follow. Maybe I can and I did not think of doing that? Again, relatively new to coding so there is a good chance I am over complicating things.
    – codian
    Oct 26, 2021 at 15:52

1 Answer 1

3

Or in one iteration:

cars.each_with_object(Hash.new(0)) { |car, hash| hash[car[:make]] += car[:value] }
#=> {"Nissan"=>15000, "Toyota"=>6500, "Honda"=>12400}

Docs about Enumerable#each_with_object and Hash#new with a default

2
  • @CarySwoveland I was typing the same comment !!
    – Fravadona
    Oct 26, 2021 at 18:10
  • @CarySwoveland Thank you, I updated my answer. Isn't it funny that the order of the block parameters is different for inject and each_with_object. This is so confusing. Oct 26, 2021 at 18:49

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