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I'm new to Haskell and trying to not instinctively think imperatively. I have a function which does all the work in a pattern matching block, however it needs to pattern match on the argument after a function is applied to it.

Doing this in a functional way gets me to this:

foo :: Int -> String
foo n = bar $ show n

bar :: String -> String
bar [] = ""
bar (c:s) = "-" ++ bar s

Where foo is the function I'm trying to implement but bar is where all the work gets done. foo only exists to provide the right type signature and perform the precursor show transformation before calling bar. In practice, bar could get quite complicated, but still, I have no reason to expose it as a separate function.

What's the Haskell way to perform a simple function like show and "then" pattern match on the result of that?

I tried changing the pattern matching to a case statement, but it didn't permit the all-important recursion, because there was no function to call recursively. For the same reason, using a where clause applied to multiple patterns also doesn't work.

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  • 1
    Note that this is an example of composition, as foo could be defined simply as foo = bar . show.
    – chepner
    Oct 27, 2021 at 0:55
  • 1
    Breaking things up into multiple functions is perfectly normal; even in imperative programming it's usually recommended to keep procedures/methods small, breaking up complicated functionality into multiple units. And just like in most imperative languages, you don't have to expose all of the functions you have written; the module system is perfectly capable of exporting foo and keeping bar private. However the answer you found with where is a great way of making it completely clear that bar is only written for the purpose of defining foo, and is irrelevant to any other purpose.
    – Ben
    Oct 27, 2021 at 2:11
  • 3
    The idiomatic way to do this is foo n = '-' <$ show n -- i.e. reuse existing recursive functions where possible rather than writing the recursion yourself. Oct 27, 2021 at 3:14
  • I may be misunderstanding, but can't you just do foo n = case (show n) of... ? Oct 27, 2021 at 9:11
  • @RobinZigmond nearly, but when you do the (c:s) case there is no bar to call recursively. If you try to call foo instead, you'll pass a String and it is expecting an Int. Oct 27, 2021 at 9:28

2 Answers 2

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I remembered that Learn You A Haskell often seemed to emphasise that where and let are more powerful than they first seem because "everything is a function" and the clauses are expressions themselves.

That prompted me to see if I could push where a bit harder and use it to essentially define the helper function bar. Turns out I can:

foo :: Int -> String
foo n = bar $ show n
  where bar [] = ""
        bar (c:s) = "-" ++ bar s

Unless there's a better way, I think this is the solution I'm after. It took a bit of beating back my imperative tendencies to see this, but it's starting to look logical and much more "core" than I was imagining.

Please provide an alternative answer if these assumptions are leading me off course!

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  • 1
    Aside: I’m not sure whether this limitation relates to the imperative/functional divide. Other functional languages (e.g. the ML family, and even λ-calculus with sums i.e. a theoretical prototype of functional languages) do pattern matching on arbitrary expressions, rather than on function parameters (you get essentially what you achieved in Haskell with your where construct, except that you don’t have to name the matcher).
    – Maëlan
    Oct 27, 2021 at 18:08
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It depends on whether the pattern-matching function is recursive or not. In your example, it is called bar and is recursive.

foo :: Int -> String
foo n = bar $ show n

bar :: String -> String
bar [] = ""
bar (c:s) = "-" ++ bar s

Here, the (arguably) best solution is the one you found: use where (or let) and define it locally to foo:

foo :: Int -> String
foo n = bar $ show n
   where
   bar :: String -> String   -- optional type annotation
   bar [] = ""
   bar (c:s) = "-" ++ bar s

The type annotation for the inner function is optional. Many Haskellers think that the top-level function foo should have its signature (and GHC with -Wall warns if you do not provide it) but also believe that the inner function do not have to be annotated. For what it is worth, I like to add it when I think it's non obvious from the context. Feel free to include or omit it.

When bar is not recursive, we have other options. Consider this code:

foo :: Int -> String
foo n = bar $ show n

bar :: String -> String
bar []    = "empty"
bar (c:s) = "nonempty " ++ c : s

Here, we can use case of:

foo :: Int -> String
foo n = case show n of
   []    -> "empty"
   (c:s) -> "nonempty " ++ c : s

This calls function show first, and then pattern-matches its result. I think this is easier to read than adding a where to define bar.

Theoretically, speaking, we could follow the case approach even in the recursive case, and leverage fix (a function from the library) to close the recursion. I do not recommend you to do this, since defining bar using where (or let) is more readable. I'm adding this less readable option here only for the sake of completeness.

foo :: Int -> String
foo n = fix (\bar x -> case x of
   []    -> ""
   (c:s) -> "-" ++ bar s
   ) $ show n

This is equivalent to the first recursive code snippet, but it requires much more time to read. The helper fix has its uses, but if I read this in actual production code I'd think the programmer is trying to show they are "clever" instead of writing simple, readable code.

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