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I am trying to create a polyfill for the call, apply and bind methods.

const user = {
  firstName: "Christopher",
  lastName: "Nolan",
};

const fullName = function (place, country) {
  console.log(
    `${this.firstName} ${this.lastName} is from ${place}, ${country}.`
  );
};

// Using a call method

fullName.call(user, "London", "UK");

// Re-creating a call method with the name of "_call"

Function.prototype._call = function (...args) {
  const funcObj = this;
  const params = args.slice(1);
  return (function () {
    const obj = args[0];
       
    // How can I point out the obj to "this" keyword inside a funcObj without using the bind method as I mentioned below.
         return funcObj.bind(obj, ...params)();
         })();
};

fullName._call(user, "London", "UK");
6
  • Why are you trying to "polyfill" language features that are present in the original spec from 1999? Oct 27, 2021 at 3:55
  • @rayhatfield Probably the Code Review SE semantics of “reinventing-the-wheel”? Oct 27, 2021 at 3:58
  • Hey @rayhatfield, Thank you for the reply! I tried this because I have seen questions like a polyfill for the "bind" method where people were used call and apply methods to achieve that. It didn't make any sense to me because if there is no support for the bind method in the older browsers, how come these browsers will support the "call" and the "apply" method?
    – Deva
    Nov 1, 2021 at 23:31
  • 1
    @Deva Function.prototype.call and Function.prototype.apply were introduced in ECMAScript 3, in 1999/2000. Function.prototype.bind was introduced in ECMAScript 5 in 2009/2011. Polyfilling bind in terms of features that have been supported up to 10 years before makes sense. However, ECMAScript 3 is considered the lowest common denominator in terms of browser support, so polyfilling ES3 features isn’t that useful, and unlikely to be possible. Nov 1, 2021 at 23:41
  • Hello @SebastianSimon, Thank you for your detailed explanation. I thought that the bind method was also introduced in ECMAScript 3. Thank you for clarifying that.
    – Deva
    Nov 2, 2021 at 3:31

2 Answers 2

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Yes. Just use

var myObject = this;

I understand the problem you might be having. Sometimes by the time you wish to use the 'this' object the context of 'this' has changed. Some people use

var that = this;

Here's some more reading for you that goes a bit deeper.

https://dbwriteups.wordpress.com/2017/04/08/what-does-that-this-in-javascript-mean/

0

I'm not sure this is a great implementation, but you could take advantage of the fact that for an object method the scope is automatically set to the object upon which it was invoked.

With that in mind you could create an object using the scope as the prototype and add the original function as a method, then invoke the method.

const user = {
  firstName: "Christopher",
  lastName: "Nolan",
};

const fullName = function (place, country) {
  console.log(
    `${this.firstName} ${this.lastName} is from ${place}, ${country}.`
  );
};

Function.prototype._call = function (scope, ...args) {
  // symbol for the method name to avoid name collisions
  const symbol = Symbol();
  
  // create a new object from scope with the original function (this) as a method
  const temp = Object.create(scope, {[symbol]: { value: this }});
  
  // inside the method "this" will point to "temp" which is (effectively) "scope"
  return temp[symbol](...args);
}

fullName._call(user, 'London', 'UK');

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