3

I have a pretty good understanding of R but am new to JSON file types and best practices for parsing. I'm having difficulties building a data frame from a raw JSON file. The JSON file (data below) is made up of repeated measure data that has multiple observations per user.

When the raw file is read into r

 jdata<-read_json("./raw.json")

It comes in as a "List of 1" with that list being user_ids. Within each user_id are further lists, like so -

jdata$user_id$`sjohnson`$date$`2020-09-25`$city

The very last position actually splits into two options - $city or $zip. At the highest level, there are about 89 users in the complete file.

My goal would be to end up with a rectangular data frame or multiple data frames that I can merge together like this - where I don't actually need the zip code.

example table

I've tried jsonlite along with tidyverse and the farthest I seem to get is a data frame with one variable at the smallest level - cities and zip codes alternating rows using this

df  <-  as.data.frame(matrix(unlist(jdata), nrow=length(unlist(jdata["users"]))))

Any help/suggestions to get closer to the table above would be much appreciated. I have a feeling I'm failing at looping it back through the different levels.

Here is an example of the raw json file structure:

 {
  "user_id": {
    "sjohnson": {
      "date": {
        "2020-09-25": {
              "city": "Denver",
              "zip": "80014"
            },
            "2020-10-01": {
              "city": "Atlanta",
              "zip": "30301"
            },
            "2020-11-04": {
              "city": "Jacksonville",
              "zip": "14001"
            }
         },
    "asmith: {
      "date": {
        "2020-10-16": {
              "city": "Cleavland",
              "zip": "34321"
        },
        "2020-11-10": {
              "City": "Elmhurst",
              "zip": "00013
            },
            "2020-11-10 08:49:36": {
              "location": null,
              "timestamp": 1605016176013
            }
          }
 
6
  • Hi, and welcome! Are you sure your JSON is correct? There seem to be a few missing braces } to demarcate the ends the user objects. Also, can I ask how this JSON is generated? It seems a rather convoluted structure.
    – Greg
    Oct 27, 2021 at 17:32
  • 1
    Can you please check the code example? There are missing several closing brackets.
    – deschen
    Oct 27, 2021 at 17:37
  • There‘s also a missing quotation after asmith….and the last zip code.
    – deschen
    Oct 27, 2021 at 17:40
  • maybe rjson package can help cran.r-project.org/web/packages/rjson/rjson.pdf Oct 27, 2021 at 18:41
  • 1
    Thank you so much for the initial comments! Yes, the JSON is very convoluted. Unfortunately, I have very little control/say in its structure or upkeep. Its comes from a firestore web app, that is converted from a leveldb file. Missing brackets or errors in the code are likely from me - removing and copying from an "example" of the multi nested JSON.
    – Sescro
    Oct 27, 2021 at 21:28

3 Answers 3

3

Another (straightforward) solution doing the heavy-lifting with rrapply() in the rrapply-package:

library(rrapply)
library(dplyr)

rrapply(jdata, how = "melt") %>%
  filter(L5 == "city") %>%
  select(user_id = L2, date = L4, city = value)

#>    user_id       date         city
#> 1 sjohnson 2020-09-25       Denver
#> 2 sjohnson 2020-10-01      Atlanta
#> 3 sjohnson 2020-11-04 Jacksonville
#> 4   asmith 2020-10-16    Cleavland
#> 5   asmith 2020-11-10     Elmhurst

Data

jdata <- jsonlite::fromJSON('{
   "user_id": {
    "sjohnson": {
       "date": {
        "2020-09-25": {
           "city": "Denver",
          "zip": "80014"
        },
        "2020-10-01": {
          "city": "Atlanta",
          "zip": "30301"
         },
        "2020-11-04": {
          "city": "Jacksonville",
          "zip": "14001"
        }
       }
    },
    "asmith": {
       "date": {
         "2020-10-16": {
           "city": "Cleavland",
           "zip": "34321"
         },
        "2020-11-10": {
           "city": "Elmhurst",
           "zip": "00013"
         },
         "2020-11-10 08:49:36": {
          "location": null,
          "timestamp": 1605016176013
        }
       }
     }
   }
}')
2
  • 1
    Oh nice. What an awesome package. This will simplify tons of scripts I have for accessing APIs and reshping their content into some useful data structures.
    – deschen
    Oct 28, 2021 at 19:33
  • Very concise! I (and others) wondering if there's a way to pivot_longer(), such that the value (ex. "user_id") in each odd-numbered column (1:5) becomes a column name (user_id), containing the corresponding values from the subsequent even-numbered column ("sjohnson" and "asmith"). I know it can be done iteratively, but I'd love to do it in one fell swoop: a single pivot field_1_names | field_1_values | field_2_names | field_2_values | ... | field_n_names | field_n_values would become field_1 | field_2 | ... | field_n.
    – Greg
    Oct 28, 2021 at 19:55
2

We can build our desired structure step by step:

library(jsonlite)
library(tidyverse)

df <- fromJSON('{
   "user_id": {
    "sjohnson": {
       "date": {
        "2020-09-25": {
           "city": "Denver",
          "zip": "80014"
        },
        "2020-10-01": {
          "city": "Atlanta",
          "zip": "30301"
         },
        "2020-11-04": {
          "city": "Jacksonville",
          "zip": "14001"
        }
       }
    },
    "asmith": {
       "date": {
         "2020-10-16": {
           "city": "Cleavland",
           "zip": "34321"
         },
        "2020-11-10": {
           "city": "Elmhurst",
           "zip": "00013"
         },
         "2020-11-10 08:49:36": {
          "location": null,
          "timestamp": 1605016176013
        }
       }
     }
   }
}')

df %>%
  bind_rows() %>%
  pivot_longer(everything(), names_to = 'user_id') %>%
  unnest_longer(value, indices_to = 'date') %>%
  unnest_longer(value, indices_to = 'var') %>%
  mutate(city = unlist(value)) %>%
  filter(var == 'city') %>%
  select(-var, -value)

which gives:

# A tibble: 5 x 3
  user_id  date       city        
  <chr>    <chr>      <chr>       
1 sjohnson 2020-09-25 Denver      
2 sjohnson 2020-10-01 Atlanta     
3 sjohnson 2020-11-04 Jacksonville
4 asmith   2020-10-16 Cleavland   
5 asmith   2020-11-10 Elmhurst

Alternative solution inspired by @Greg where we change the last two rows:

df %>%
  bind_rows() %>%
  pivot_longer(everything(), names_to = 'user_id') %>%
  unnest_longer(value, indices_to = 'date') %>%
  unnest_longer(value, indices_to = 'var') %>%
  mutate(value = unlist(value)) %>%
  pivot_wider(names_from = "var") %>%
  select(user_id, date, city)

This gives almost the same results with the exception of one additional case where city is NA:

# A tibble: 6 x 3
  user_id  date                city        
  <chr>    <chr>               <chr>       
1 sjohnson 2020-09-25          Denver      
2 sjohnson 2020-10-01          Atlanta     
3 sjohnson 2020-11-04          Jacksonville
4 asmith   2020-10-16          Cleavland   
5 asmith   2020-11-10          Elmhurst    
6 asmith   2020-11-10 08:49:36 NA    
3
  • 1
    Oh wow, that's a very nifty solution! I have some experience with tidyr, but I wasn't fully aware of the unnest_*() functions. I ended up writing my own, which was quite laborious in this case...though it does have the advantage of working for arbitrary nestings, without having to code by hand an extra unnest_longer() for each and every every further level that is unnested. NOTE: You could revise the mutate() step to mutate(value = unlist(value)), and then just %>% pivot_wider(values_from = value, names_from = var) and finally select(user_id, date, city).
    – Greg
    Oct 27, 2021 at 22:51
  • Oh yes, that's not a bad idea, although it will keep this one NA value (which might or might not be preferable for the TO).
    – deschen
    Oct 28, 2021 at 5:49
  • Nice update! I always default to preserving more information (like NA rows), which can be filtered out in the end, at the user's discretion; so I'd incline toward your second solution.
    – Greg
    Oct 28, 2021 at 13:36
1

Here's a solution in the tidyverse: a custom function unnestable() designed to recursively unnest into a table the contents of a list like you describe. See Details for particulars regarding the format of such a list and its table.

Solution

First ensure the necessary libraries are present:

library(jsonlite)
library(tidyverse)

Then define the unnestable() function as follows:

unnestable <- function(v) {
  # If we've reached the bottommost list, simply treat it as a table...
  if(all(sapply(
    X = v,
    # Check that each element is a single value (or NULL).
    FUN = function(x) {
      is.null(x) || purrr::is_scalar_atomic(x)
    },
    simplify = TRUE
  ))) {
    v %>%
      # Replace any NULLs with NAs to preserve blank fields...
      sapply(
        FUN = function(x) {
          if(is.null(x))
            NA
          else
            x
        },
        simplify = FALSE
      ) %>%
      # ...and convert this bottommost list into a table.
      tidyr::as_tibble()
  }
  # ...but if this list contains another nested list, then recursively unnest its
  # contents and combine their tabular results.
  else if(purrr::is_scalar_list(v)) {
    # Take the contents within the nested list...
    v[[1]] %>%
      # ...apply this 'unnestable()' function to them recursively...
      sapply(
        FUN = unnestable,
        simplify = FALSE,
        USE.NAMES = TRUE
      ) %>%
      # ...and stack their results.
      dplyr::bind_rows(.id = names(v)[1])
  }
  # Otherwise, the format is unrecognized and yields no results.
  else {
    NULL
  }
}

Finally, process the JSON data as follows:

# Read the JSON file into an R list.
jdata <- jsonlite::read_json("./raw.json")


# Flatten the R list into a table, via 'unnestable()'
flat_data <- unnestable(jdata)


# View the raw table.
flat_data

Naturally, you can reformat this table however you desire:

library(lubridate)

flat_data <- flat_data %>%
  dplyr::transmute(
    user_id = as.character(user_id),
    date = lubridate::as_datetime(date),
    city = as.character(city)
  ) %>%
  dplyr::distinct()


# View the reformatted table.
flat_data

Results

Given a raw.json file like that sampled here

{
  "user_id": {
    "sjohnson": {
      "date": {
        "2020-09-25": {
          "city": "Denver",
          "zip": "80014"
        },
        "2020-10-01": {
          "city": "Atlanta",
          "zip": "30301"
        },
        "2020-11-04": {
          "city": "Jacksonville",
          "zip": "14001"
        }
      }
    },
    "asmith": {
      "date": {
        "2020-10-16": {
          "city": "Cleavland",
          "zip": "34321"
        },
        "2020-11-10": {
          "city": "Elmhurst",
          "zip": "00013"
        },
        "2020-11-10 08:49:36": {
          "location": null,
          "timestamp": 1605016176013
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

then unnestable() will yield a tibble like this

# A tibble: 6 x 6
  user_id  date                city         zip   location     timestamp
  <chr>    <chr>               <chr>        <chr> <lgl>            <dbl>
1 sjohnson 2020-09-25          Denver       80014 NA                  NA
2 sjohnson 2020-10-01          Atlanta      30301 NA                  NA
3 sjohnson 2020-11-04          Jacksonville 14001 NA                  NA
4 asmith   2020-10-16          Cleavland    34321 NA                  NA
5 asmith   2020-11-10          Elmhurst     00013 NA                  NA
6 asmith   2020-11-10 08:49:36 NA           NA    NA       1605016176013

which dplyr will format into the result below:

# A tibble: 6 x 3
  user_id  date                city        
  <chr>    <dttm>              <chr>       
1 sjohnson 2020-09-25 00:00:00 Denver      
2 sjohnson 2020-10-01 00:00:00 Atlanta     
3 sjohnson 2020-11-04 00:00:00 Jacksonville
4 asmith   2020-10-16 00:00:00 Cleavland   
5 asmith   2020-11-10 00:00:00 Elmhurst    
6 asmith   2020-11-10 08:49:36 NA          

Details

List Format

To be precise, the list represents nested groupings by the fields {group_1, group_2, ..., group_n}, and it must be of the form:

list(
  group_1 = list(
    "value_1" = list(
      group_2 = list(
        "value_1.1" = list(
          # .
          #  .
          #   .
               group_n = list(
                 "value_1.1.….n.1" = list(
                   field_a =    1,
                   field_b = TRUE
                 ),
                 "value_1.1.….n.2" = list(
                   field_a =   2,
                   field_c = "2"
                 )
                 # ...
               )
        ),
        "value_1.2" = list(
          # .
          #  .
          #   .
        )
        # ...
      )
    ),
    "value_2" = list(
      group_2 = list(
        "value_2.1" = list(
          # .
          #  .
          #   .
               group_n = list(
                 "value_2.1.….n.1" = list(
                   field_a =   3,
                   field_d = 3.0
                 )
                 # ...
               )
        ),
        "value_2.2" = list(
          # .
          #  .
          #   .
        )
        # ...
      )
    )
    # ...
  )
)

Table Format

Given a list of this form, unnestable() will flatten it into a table of the following form:

# A tibble: … x …
  group_1 group_2   ... group_n         field_a field_b field_c field_d
  <chr>   <chr>     ... <chr>             <dbl> <lgl>   <chr>     <dbl>
1 value_1 value_1.1 ... value_1.1.….n.1       1 TRUE    NA           NA
2 value_1 value_1.1 ... value_1.1.….n.2       2 NA      2            NA
3 value_1 value_1.2 ... value_1.2.….n.1     ... ...     ...         ...
⋮    ⋮         ⋮                 ⋮              ⋮  ⋮       ⋮             ⋮
j value_2 value_2.1 ... value_2.1.….n.1       3 NA      NA            3
⋮    ⋮         ⋮                 ⋮              ⋮  ⋮       ⋮             ⋮
k value_2 value_2.2 ... value_2.2.….n.1     ... ...     ...         ...
⋮    ⋮         ⋮                 ⋮              ⋮  ⋮       ⋮             ⋮
1
  • This is perfect and exactly what I need! Thank you so much!
    – Sescro
    Oct 27, 2021 at 21:43

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