29

I want to run cleanup code after a certain block of code completes, regardless of exceptions. This is not a closeable resource and I cannot use try-with-resources (or Kotlin's use). In Java, I could do the following:

try {
  // ... Run some code
} catch(Exception ex) {
  // ... Handle exception 
} finally {
  // ... Cleanup code
}

Is the following Kotlin code equivalent?

runCatching {
  // ... Run some code
}.also {
  // ... Cleanup code
}.onFailure {
  // ... Handle exception
}

Edit: added boilerplate exception handling - my concern is with ensuring the cleanup code runs, and maintainability.

6
  • The question is phrased as if Kotlin doesn't have a trycatchfinally structure very similar to Java's — but it does. Is there a reason why you don't want to use them?
    – gidds
    Commented Oct 28, 2021 at 16:56
  • Cleaner code. I wasn't sure if there are any special quirks I should bear in mind before assuming that the .also {} code is always executed. Commented Oct 28, 2021 at 18:32
  • I do the catch and rethrow very often and I find that runCatching {..}.getOrElse { throw... } pattern quite handful and very clean.
    – KenIchi
    Commented Jun 28, 2023 at 4:14
  • @KenIchi If you're catching and throwing the same exception it's the same behavior as no runCatching at all, how is it handful?
    – m0skit0
    Commented Sep 12, 2023 at 11:11
  • It should have been handy or helpful. (Sorry for my bad English ;) )
    – KenIchi
    Commented Sep 13, 2023 at 3:26

4 Answers 4

38

There is one important difference, where the code inside runCatching contains an early return. A finally block will be executed even after a return, whereas also has no such magic.

This code, when run, will print nothing:

fun test1()
    runCatching {
        return
    }.also {
        println("test1")
    }
}

This code, when run, will print "test2":

fun test2() {
    try {
        return
    } finally {
        println("test2")
    }
}
12

There is one big difference between both code samples. try...finally propagates exceptions while runCatching().also() catches/consumes them. To make it similar you would have to throw the result at the end:

runCatching {
  // ... Run some code
}.also {
  // ... Cleanup code
}.getOrThrow()

But still, it is not really 1:1 equivalent. It catches all exceptions just to rethrow them. For this reason, it is probably less performant than simple try...finally.

Also, I think this is less clear for the reader. try...finally is a standard way of dealing with exceptions. By using runCatching() just to immediately rethrow, you actually confuse people reading this code later.

Your question sounded a little like you believed Kotlin does not have try...finally and you need to search for alternatives. If this is the case, then of course Kotlin has try...finally and I think you should use it instead of runCatching().

4
  • Thanks. I think I did not phrase my question accurately - I was mostly curious whether there are edge cases/quirks to consider in terms of ensuring the cleanup code is running. Commented Oct 28, 2021 at 15:48
  • Hmm, I personally don't see any such edge cases. I think we can be sure that the code in also() will be executed.
    – broot
    Commented Oct 28, 2021 at 15:58
  • 9
    There is absolutely such an edge case, if the code inside runCatching contains an early return. A finally block will be executed even after a return, whereas also has no such magic. Here's a Kotlin playground link: pl.kotl.in/gbqwRNIcV
    – Sam
    Commented Oct 29, 2021 at 8:14
  • 1
    @Sam Ahh, good point!
    – broot
    Commented Oct 29, 2021 at 8:32
4

As per Kotlin's doc for runCatching:

Calls the specified function block and returns its encapsulated result if invocation was successful, catching any Throwable exception that was thrown from the block function execution and encapsulating it as a failure.

Even if finally always runs after a try block and also always runs after a runCatching, they do not serve the same purpose.

finally doesn't receive any argument and cannot operate on the values of the try block, while also receives the Result of the runCatching block.

TLDR; .runCatching{}.also{} is a more advanced try{}finally{}

3

There is also a difference in what is the result of evaluating the expression.

Consider the following code:

fun main() {
    val foo = try { 
        throw Exception("try")
    } catch(e: Exception) {
        "catch"
    } finally {
        "finally"
    }

    val bar = runCatching{
        throw Exception("runCatching")
    }.also{
        "also"
    }.onFailure {
        "onFailure"
    }

    println(foo)
    println(bar)
}

The output will be:

catch
Failure(java.lang.Exception: runCatching)

https://pl.kotl.in/a0aByS5l1

EDIT:

An interesting article that points out some differences as well:

https://medium.com/@mattia23r/a-take-on-functional-error-handling-in-kotlin-515b67b4212b

Now let’s give a second look at the implementation of runCatching in the gist above. What does it do? It catches everything.

In this case, it goes even further: it catches all Throwables. For those not knowing, Throwable is everything that can go after a throw keyword; it has two descendants: Exceptions and Errors. We haven’t mentioned Errors so far; Errors usually represent something wrong that happened at a lower level than your business logic, something that can’t usually be recovered with a simple catch.

1
  • It's returning Failure because you are returning object returned by onFailure. If you use getOrElse you can make it return onFailure string.
    – Xnkr
    Commented Apr 6, 2023 at 17:56

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