I've recently come across the &method(:method_name) syntax. (This uses the Object#method method - RDoc link) For example,

[5, 7, 8, 1].each(&method(:puts))

is the equivalent of

[5, 7, 8, 1].each{|number| puts number}

Are there performance penalties for the latter compared to the former in the various implementations of Ruby? If so, are the implementors working on improving its performance?

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Yes, it appears to be bad for performance.

def time
  start = Time.now
  yield
  "%.6f" % (Time.now - start)
end

def do_nothing(arg)
end


RUBY_VERSION # => "1.9.2"

# small
ary = *1..10
time { ary.each(&method(:do_nothing)) }     # => "0.000019"
time { ary.each { |arg| do_nothing arg } }  # => "0.000003"


# large
ary = *1..10_000
time { ary.each(&method(:do_nothing)) }     # => "0.002787"
time { ary.each { |arg| do_nothing arg } }  # => "0.001810"


# huge
ary = *1..10_000_000
time { ary.each(&method(:do_nothing)) }     # => "37.901283"
time { ary.each { |arg| do_nothing arg } }  # => "1.754063"

It looks like this is addressed in JRuby:

$ rvm use jruby
Using /Users/joshuajcheek/.rvm/gems/jruby-1.6.3

$ xmpfilter f.rb 
def time
  start = Time.now
  yield
  "%.6f" % (Time.now - start)
end

def do_nothing(arg)
end


RUBY_VERSION # => "1.8.7"

# small
ary = *1..10
time { ary.each(&method(:do_nothing)) }     # => "0.009000"
time { ary.each { |arg| do_nothing arg } }  # => "0.001000"


# large
ary = *1..10_000
time { ary.each(&method(:do_nothing)) }     # => "0.043000"
time { ary.each { |arg| do_nothing arg } }  # => "0.055000"


# huge
ary = *1..10_000_000
time { ary.each(&method(:do_nothing)) }     # => "0.427000"
time { ary.each { |arg| do_nothing arg } }  # => "0.634000"
  • your &:method(:do_nothing) is not analogous to do_nothing arg – Ben West Apr 13 '15 at 22:42
  • Not sure what you mean. – Joshua Cheek Apr 14 '15 at 10:21
  • maybe the do_nothing method receives no parameters in the first one but receives arg as a parameter in the second one – Cruz Nunez Jan 25 '17 at 21:15

Since Rubinius is the most advanced and most aggressively optimizing Ruby implementation, I asked this question on the Rubinius mailinglist, and here's what Evan Phoenix had to say:

Your assumption that it could be the same as a block is, I'm sad to say, dead wrong. There reason you don't see Method#to_proc and such in profiling is 2 fold:

  1. Most (all?) MRI profilers do not show methods that MRI defines in C, so they'd never show up.
  2. The mechanism for activating a method that has been turned into a Proc is all in C, so the overhead is invisible on the invocation side too.

Your point about the arty differences are right on. Additionally, your thinking that a VM could easily optimize it into a block is quite wrong. Object#method is a not something that would be detected and optimized away. Additionally, even with runtime optimizations, something like escape analysis is still required since #method returns a Method object that you'd have to see inside and extract the information from. On the invocation side, the invoked method can only do something special with the block in the case of block inlining, an optimization that only Rubinius has.

So to get to your questions:

  1. Does Rubinius optimize this code? No. Could it? Yes, but it's hardly easy.
  2. In time it could, yes.
  3. In time it should, yes.

Note: the questions he refers to in the last paragraph are:

  1. Does Rubinius currently optimize such point-free code?
  2. If it doesn't, could it?
  3. If it could, should it?
  • I've seen Symbol#to_proc show up in ruby-prof profiling of MRI 1.8 (the implementation without a name?), so I don't see why Method#to_proc wouldn't show up. However, that's the overhead for turning a symbol or method into some sort of proc. I suspect that the execution speed of the said proc may differ from that of a normal block: see the links from stackoverflow.com/questions/6501030/… – Andrew Grimm Aug 24 '11 at 1:40
  • About profiling methods defined in C: I suspect that the non-Ruby version of perftools might be able to do that (ie "Profiling the Ruby VM and C extensions"). – Andrew Grimm Aug 24 '11 at 1:43

It would appear they are both very similar/ the same on the latest ruby 1.9.2

# Using ruby 1.9.2-p290

require 'benchmark'

Benchmark.measure do
  1000.times { [5, 7, 8, 1].each(&method(:puts)) }
end

# =>   0.020000   0.020000   0.040000 (  0.066408)
# =>   0.020000   0.010000   0.030000 (  0.075474)
# =>   0.020000   0.020000   0.040000 (  0.048462)

Benchmark.measure do
  1000.times { [5, 7, 8, 1].each{|number| puts number} }
end

# =>   0.020000   0.020000   0.040000 (  0.071505)
# =>   0.020000   0.020000   0.040000 (  0.062571)
# =>   0.010000   0.020000   0.030000 (  0.040944)

Here is a nice write up on it(just in time):

http://www.potstuck.com/2011/08/06/ruby-symbols-instead-of-blocks/

If you look closely at the profiling numbers in Mario's answer there is a slight penalty for the additional method calls as a result of calling Symbol#to_proc.

Just a guess, but I would say no, they probably won't be speeding it up anytime soon.

  • 2
    The link is describing &:foo (which calls object.foo), not &method(:foo) (which calls foo(object)). – Andrew Grimm Aug 8 '11 at 6:41
  • Sorry about that. Clearly they are not the same call. Still a nice article though! – seph Aug 8 '11 at 14:19

as of ruby 1.9.3-p327

def time &block
  start = Time.now
  yield
  puts "%s : %.6f" % block.to_s, (Time.now - start))
end

RUBY_VERSION # => "1.9.3-p327"

# small
ary = *1..10
time { ary.each(&:to_i) }     # => "0.000010"
time { ary.each { |arg| arg.to_i } }  # => "0.000002"

# large
ary = *1..10_000
time { ary.each(&:to_i) }     # => "0.000494"
time { ary.each { |arg| arg.to_i } }  # => "0.000798"

# huge
ary = *1..10_000_000
time { ary.each(&:to_i) }     # => "0.504329"
time { ary.each { |arg| arg.to_i } }  # => "0.883390"
  • This is a little different, since it's calling a method bound to the object. – Ian Hunter Jun 11 at 20:32

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