9

Is this syntax correct in creating a Foreign Key?

create table department
(
  departmentID int not null auto_increment primary key,
  name varchar(30)
) type=InnoDB;

create table employee
(
  employeeID int not null auto_increment primary key,
  name varchar(80),
  job varchar(30),
  departmentID int not null references department(departmentID)
) type=InnoDB;
  • Why don't you just try? mysql is better in checking the syntax than any person here – zerkms Aug 8 '11 at 2:04
  • 3
    @zerkms Im asking this because I have an eBook which shows that this is the right way of creating the foreign key--contrary of what Doug said It looks like MySQL accepts it (doesn't complain about the syntax) but the foreign key is not actually created. This isn't the way my instructor taught me. That's why I've tried to verify whether this way is acceptable. – aer Aug 8 '11 at 3:12
17

It looks like MySQL accepts it (doesn't complain about the syntax) but the foreign key is not actually created.

To create this foreign key, run this command:

ALTER TABLE employee ADD CONSTRAINT fk_department FOREIGN KEY (departmentID) REFERENCES department (departmentID);
  • How about my ebook's explanation of creating foreign key. "There is only one new piece of syntax in this statement. The last column in the employee table is the id of the department for which the employees work. This is a foreign key. We declare this in the table definition by adding the references clause as follows: departmentID int not null references department(departmentID) This tells us that the departmentID in the employee table should be referenced back to the departmentID column in the department table." What can you say about it? – aer Aug 8 '11 at 3:17
  • That's the explanation for the codes that I've provided. – aer Aug 8 '11 at 3:18
  • 2
    I tried the code myself and the table was created with your code, but the referencial integrity was not enforced until I created the foreign key separately, with the code I provided in the answer. – Doug Aug 8 '11 at 11:58
  • What is CONSTRAINT in SQL?... I tried googling the answer but I couldn't find clear definition for this. Thanks in advance – aer Oct 20 '11 at 2:35
  • @aer "no two rows in the table can have the same value for the columns. Primary keys also enforce uniqueness, but primary keys do not allow for NULL as one of the unique values" – Navin Sep 10 '13 at 18:10
5
create table employee
(
  employeeID int not null auto_increment primary key,
  name varchar(80),
  job varchar(30),
  departmentID int not null ADD CONSTRAINT fk_department FOREIGN KEY (departmentID) references department(departmentID)
) 
  • 5
    Welcome! why is this answer better than the accepted one, after 2 years? – STT LCU Aug 28 '13 at 14:03
1
FOREIGN KEY (departmentID) REFERENCES department(departmentID)

Thanks.!

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.