15

I just came across with this interesting question from my colleague. I'm trying now, but meanwhile I thought I could share it here.

With the password grid shown in the Android home screen, how many valid passwords are possible? min password length: 4 max: 9 (correct me if I'm wrong)

  • Please see android lock screen on youtube or somewhere. Its not just about characters, its about different ways to defining your own password. – rplusg Aug 8 '11 at 8:43
  • Actually, I don't see that this question has anything to do with algorithms. It's just really basic combinatorics. – Eric Mickelsen Aug 8 '11 at 8:56
  • I thought algorithm label is apt than "combinatorics" to reach more audience. Feel free to correct if i'm wrong, sorry. – rplusg Aug 8 '11 at 9:07
  • 1
    math.stackexchange.com/questions/37167/… Math way of solving. – rplusg Aug 8 '11 at 17:49
  • Here is the full list of combination as TXT file: github.com/delight-im/AndroidPatternLock – caw Apr 6 '14 at 22:12
23

Summary

The full combinations of 4 to 9 distinctive numbers, minus the combinations which include invalid "jump"s.

The Long Version

The rule for Android 3x3 password grid:

  • one point for once

  • cannot "jump" over a point

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The author of the original post used Mathematica to generate all 985824 combinations.

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Because there is no "jump", several pairs of consecutive points are invalid.

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Delete all invalid combinations to reach the result.

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The combinations for 4-to-9-point paths are respectively 1624, 7152, 26016, 72912, 140704, 140704.

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The Original Post In Chinese

The reference is from guokr, a site alike Stack Exchange Skeptics in the form of blogs.

  • Looks promising, gave an upvote. I shall wait for translation for more understanding :) – rplusg Aug 8 '11 at 9:24
  • @rplusg, refresh the page, and you'll get the full translation. – Dante is not a Geek Aug 8 '11 at 9:29
  • 1
    This is good, we can write a program to get answer. But it is not standard math way to solve a problem. Lets wait for more answers. – rplusg Aug 8 '11 at 9:30
  • 3
    That's ((5 guesses * 2 seconds) + 30 seconds) * 800 attempts = 32000 seconds, or about 9 hours. If you are security-conscious and have an 8- or 9-point code, again assuming it takes them half of the total number of possible guesses on average, ((5 guesses * 2 seconds) + 30 seconds) * 70000 attempts = over 30 days to crack it. Hopefully by then you would have realized that your phone was lost and changed your passwords. – g33kz0r Sep 11 '11 at 20:26
  • 1
    @Atlos, because when you decide the first 8 digits, the last digit is determined. – Dante is not a Geek Jul 10 '12 at 2:16
2

I know this question is old, but I answered it in another question (before finding this question) with a brute force approach in python, so adding it here for posterity:

pegs = {
    1: {3:2, 7:4, 9:5},
    2: {8:5},
    3: {1:2, 7:5, 9:6},
    4: {6:5},
    5: {},
    6: {4:5},
    7: {1:4, 3:5, 9:8},
    8: {2:5},
    9: {1:5, 3:6, 7:8}
}

def next_steps(path):
    return (n for n in range(1,10) if (not path or n not in path and 
                                       (n not in pegs[path[-1]] 
                                        or pegs[path[-1]][n] in path)))

def patterns(path, steps, verbose=False):
    if steps == 0:
        if verbose: print(path)
        return 1
    return sum(patterns(path+[n], steps-1) for n in next_steps(path))

So you can list all the # of patterns for any number of steps:

>>> [(steps, patterns([], steps)) for steps in range(1,10)]
[(1, 9),
 (2, 56),
 (3, 320),
 (4, 1624),
 (5, 7152),
 (6, 26016),
 (7, 72912),
 (8, 140704),
 (9, 140704)]
>>> sum(patterns([], steps) for steps in range(4,10))
389112

This is not the most efficient way of solving it because you could use reflections and only calculate a 4*corner + 4*mid-edge + 1*middle, e.g.:

>>> patterns([], 6) == 4*patterns([1], 5) + 4*patterns([2], 5) + patterns([5], 5)
True
0

I brute forced the answer with a recursive search and i found a bigger answer, 487272. The algorithm is simple: trying it all. I quoted it down here. I didn't found any error in my code (but I'm not very skilled with c++). Sorry for the grammatical error I'm not English.

#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
using namespace std;

int combo;  //counter

void research(int Ipoints /*number of points already took*/, bool Icheck[9]/*points matrix*/,int Ilast/*last took point*/,
                   int Icomboval/*combination representation, only for printing purpose*/, int deep/*number of iteration, only for printing purpose*/)
{

    //  int numcall = 0;  //DEBUG


     for( int i=0; i<9; i++) //Controlling every free point in search of a valid way to contimue
          if( Icheck[i] == false )
          {  
              //Just for security, coping every variable in a new variable. I don't know how c++ works but I will make it works
              int points = Ipoints;
              int last = Ilast;
              int comboval = Icomboval;
              bool check[9];
                   for( int j=0; j<9; j++)
                        check[j] = Icheck[j];  

              int e1,e2;
              int middle = -1;
              e1=i; e2=last;  //Ccontrolling duble jumps
              if( e1 == 0 && e2 == 2 ) middle = 1;
              if( e1 == 3 && e2 == 5 ) middle = 4;
              if( e1 == 6 && e2 == 8 ) middle = 7;
              if( e1 == 0 && e2 == 6 ) middle = 3;
              if( e1 == 1 && e2 == 7 ) middle = 4;
              if( e1 == 2 && e2 == 8 ) middle = 5;
              if( e1 == 0 && e2 == 8 ) middle = 4;
              if( e1 == 6 && e2 == 2 ) middle = 4;

              e2=i; e1=last;  // in both way
              if( e1 == 0 && e2 == 2 ) middle = 1;
              if( e1 == 3 && e2 == 5 ) middle = 4;
              if( e1 == 6 && e2 == 8 ) middle = 7;
              if( e1 == 0 && e2 == 6 ) middle = 3;
              if( e1 == 1 && e2 == 7 ) middle = 4;
              if( e1 == 2 && e2 == 8 ) middle = 5;
              if( e1 == 0 && e2 == 8 ) middle = 4;
              if( e1 == 6 && e2 == 2 ) middle = 4;

              if((middle != -1) && !(check[middle])) {      
                        check[middle] = true;
                        points++;                      //adding middle points
                        comboval *= 10;
                        comboval += middle;
              }       

              check[i] = true;
              points++;           // get the point

              comboval*=10;
              comboval += i+1;

              if(points > 3)
              {
                  combo++; // every iteration over tree points is a valid combo

                // If you want to see they all, beware because printing they all is truly slow:
                    // cout << "Combination n. " << combo << " found: " << comboval  << " , points " << points << " with " << deep << " iterations\n";
              }

              if(points > 9)   //Just for sure, emergency shutdown,
              { exit(1); }


              research(points,check,i,comboval,deep+1); /*Recursive, here is the true program!*/

              // numcall++; //DEBUG
          }

       //   cout << "Ended " << deep << " , with " << numcall << " subs called\n";   // Only for debug purposes,remove with all the //DEBUG thing

}



int main ()
{
    combo = 0; //no initial knows combo
    bool checkerboard[9];
    for( int i=0; i<9; i++) checkerboard[i]=false; //blank initial pattern

    research(0/*no point taken*/,checkerboard,-1/*just a useless value*/,0/*blank combo*/,1/*it's the firs iteration*/); //let's search!

    cout << "\n"  ;            
    cout << "And the answer is ... " << combo << "\n"; //out

    char ans='\0';
    while(ans=='\0')
    {                   //just waiting
    cin >> ans;
    }

    return 0;
}
-4

(No of Points- Valid patterns) (4 - 746) (5 - 3268) (6 - 11132) (7 - 27176) (8 - 42432) (9 - 32256)


Total of 117010 valid Patterns are possible

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