In Perl the following code will read from file specified on command line args or from stdin:

while (<>) {
   print($_);
}

This is very convenient. I just want to know what's the simplest way to read from file or stdin in bash.

14 Answers 14

up vote 311 down vote accepted

The following solution reads from a file if the script is called with a file name as the first parameter $1 otherwise from standard input.

while read line
do
  echo "$line"
done < "${1:-/dev/stdin}"

The substitution ${1:-...} takes $1 if defined otherwise the file name of the standard input of the own process is used.

  • 1
    Nice, it works. Another question is why you add a quote for it? "${1:-/proc/${$}/fd/0}" – Dagang Aug 13 '11 at 8:02
  • 11
    The filename you supply on the command line could have blanks. – Fritz G. Mehner Aug 13 '11 at 9:12
  • 2
    Is there any difference between using /proc/$$/fd/0 and /dev/stdin? I noticed the latter seems to be more common and looks more straightforward. – knowah Jan 14 '15 at 23:24
  • 6
    Better to add -r to your read command, so that it doesn't accidentally eat \ chars; use while IFS= read -r line to preserve leading and trailing whitespace. – mklement0 Feb 28 '15 at 23:34
  • 1
    @NeDark: That's curious; I just verified that it works on that platform, even when using /bin/sh - are you using a shell other than bash or sh? – mklement0 Aug 19 '15 at 19:47

Perhaps the simplest solution is to redirect stdin with a merging redirect operator:

#!/bin/bash
less <&0

Stdin is file descriptor zero. The above sends the input piped to your bash script into less's stdin.

Read more about file descriptor redirection.

  • 1
    I wish I had more upvotes to give you, I've been looking for this for years. – Marcus Downing Jun 5 '14 at 14:36
  • 8
    There is no benefit to using <&0 in this situation - your example will work the same with or without it - seemingly, tools you invoke from within a bash script by default see the same stdin as the script itself (unless the script consumes it first). – mklement0 Feb 28 '15 at 23:43
  • @mkelement0 So if a tool reads half the input buffer, will the next tool I invoke get the rest? – Asad Saeeduddin May 3 '17 at 16:28
  • "Missing filename ("less --help" for help)" when I do this... Ubuntu 16.04 – OmarOthman Jul 31 '17 at 17:11
  • 2
    where is the "or from file" part in this answer? – Sebastian Aug 2 '17 at 19:13

Here is the simplest way:

#!/bin/sh
cat -

Usage:

$ echo test | sh my_script.sh
test

To assign stdin to the variable, you may use: STDIN=$(cat -) or just simply STDIN=$(cat) as operator is not necessary (as per @mklement0 comment).


To parse each line from the standard input, try the following script:

#!/bin/bash
while IFS= read -r line; do
  printf '%s\n' "$line"
done

To read from the file or stdin (if argument is not present), you can extend it to:

#!/bin/bash
file=${1--} # POSIX-compliant; ${1:--} can be used either.
while IFS= read -r line; do
  printf '%s\n' "$line" # Or: env POSIXLY_CORRECT=1 echo "$line"
done < <(cat -- "$file")

Notes:

- read -r - Do not treat a backslash character in any special way. Consider each backslash to be part of the input line.

- Without setting IFS, by default the sequences of Space and Tab at the beginning and end of the lines are ignored (trimmed).

- Use printf instead of echo to avoid printing empty lines when the line consists of a single -e, -n or -E. However there is a workaround by using env POSIXLY_CORRECT=1 echo "$line" which executes your external GNU echo which supports it. See: How do I echo "-e"?

See: How to read stdin when no arguments are passed? at stackoverflow SE

  • You could simplify [ "$1" ] && FILE=$1 || FILE="-" to FILE=${1:--}. (Quibble: better to avoid all-uppercase shell variables to avoid name collisions with environment variables.) – mklement0 Feb 28 '15 at 23:14
  • My pleasure; actually, ${1:--} is POSIX-compliant, so it should work in all POSIX-like shells. What won't work in all such shells is process substitution (<(...)); it'll work in bash, ksh, zsh, but not in dash, for instance. Also, better to add -r to your read command, so that it doesn't accidentally eat \ chars; prepend IFS= to preserve leading and trailing whitespace. – mklement0 Feb 28 '15 at 23:40
  • 3
    In fact your code still breaks because of echo: if a line consists of -e, -n or -E, it won't be shown. To fix this, you must use printf: printf '%s\n' "$line". I didn't include it in my previous edit… too often my edits are rollbacked when I fix this error :(. – gniourf_gniourf Mar 1 '15 at 0:02
  • 1
    Nope it doesn't fail. And the -- is useless if first argument is '%s\n' – gniourf_gniourf Mar 1 '15 at 0:06
  • 1
    Your answer's fine by me (I mean there are no bugs or unwanted features I'm aware of anymore)—though it doesn't treat multiple arguments as Perl does. In fact, if you want to handle multiple arguments, you'll end up writing Jonathan Leffler's excellent answer—in fact yours would be better since you'd use IFS= with read and printf instead of echo. :). – gniourf_gniourf Mar 1 '15 at 0:17

The echo solution adds new lines whenever IFS breaks the input stream. @fgm's answer can be modified a bit:

cat "${1:-/dev/stdin}" > "${2:-/dev/stdout}"
  • Could you please explain what you mean by "echo solution adds new lines whenever IFS breaks the input stream"? In case you were referring to read's behavior: while read does potentially split into multiple tokens by the chars. contained in $IFS, it only returns a single token if you only specify a single variable name (but trims and leading and trailing whitespace by default). – mklement0 Feb 28 '15 at 23:19
  • @mklement0 I agree 100% with you on the behavior of read and $IFS - echo itself adds new lines without the -n flag. "The echo utility writes any specified operands, separated by single blank (` ') characters and followed by a newline (`\n') character, to the standard output." – David Souther Mar 1 '15 at 16:36
  • Got it. However, to emulate the Perl loop you need the trailing \n added by echo: Perl's $_ includes the line ending \n from the line read, while bash's read does not. (However, as @gniourf_gniourf points out elsewhere, the more robust approach is to use printf '%s\n' in lieu of echo). – mklement0 Mar 1 '15 at 17:01

I think this is the straight-forward way:

$ cat reader.sh
#!/bin/bash
while read line; do
  echo "reading: ${line}"
done < /dev/stdin

--

$ cat writer.sh
#!/bin/bash
for i in {0..5}; do
  echo "line ${i}"
done

--

$ ./writer.sh | ./reader.sh
reading: line 0
reading: line 1
reading: line 2
reading: line 3
reading: line 4
reading: line 5
  • 3
    This doesn't fit the requirement by the poster for reading from either stdin or a file argument, this just reads from stdin. – nash Aug 7 '14 at 20:53
  • 1
    Leaving @nash's valid objection aside: read reads from stdin by default, so there's no need for < /dev/stdin. – mklement0 Feb 28 '15 at 21:44

The Perl loop in the question reads from all the file name arguments on the command line, or from standard input if no files are specified. The answers I see all seem to process a single file or standard input if there is no file specified.

Although often derided accurately as UUOC (Useless Use of cat), there are times when cat is the best tool for the job, and it is arguable that this is one of them:

cat "$@" |
while read -r line
do
    echo "$line"
done

The only downside to this is that it creates a pipeline running in a sub-shell, so things like variable assignments in the while loop are not accessible outside the pipeline. The bash way around that is Process Substitution:

while read -r line
do
    echo "$line"
done < <(cat "$@")

This leaves the while loop running in the main shell, so variables set in the loop are accessible outside the loop.

  • Excellent point about multiple files. I don't know what the resource and performance implications would be, but if you're not on bash, ksh, or zsh and therefore can't use process substitution, you could try a here-doc with command substitution (spread across 3 lines) >>EOF\n$(cat "$@")\nEOF. Finally, a quibble: while IFS= read -r line is a better approximation of what while (<>) does in Perl (preserves leading and trailing whitespace - though Perl also keeps the trailing \n). – mklement0 Feb 28 '15 at 23:21

Perl's behavior, with the code given in the OP can take none or several arguments, and if an argument is a single hyphen - this is understood as stdin. Moreover, it's always possible to have the filename with $ARGV. None of the answers given so far really mimic Perl's behavior in these respects. Here's a pure Bash possibility. The trick is to use exec appropriately.

#!/bin/bash

(($#)) || set -- -
while (($#)); do
   { [[ $1 = - ]] || exec < "$1"; } &&
   while read -r; do
      printf '%s\n' "$REPLY"
   done
   shift
done

Filename's available in $1.

If no arguments are given, we artificially set - as the first positional parameter. We then loop on the parameters. If a parameter is not -, we redirect standard input from filename with exec. If this redirection succeeds we loop with a while loop. I'm using the standard REPLY variable, and in this case you don't need to reset IFS. If you want another name, you must reset IFS like so (unless, of course, you don't want that and know what you're doing):

while IFS= read -r line; do
    printf '%s\n' "$line"
done

More accurately...

while IFS= read -r line ; do
    printf "%s\n" "$line"
done < file
  • 2
    I assume this is essentially a comment on stackoverflow.com/a/6980232/45375, not an answer. To make the comment explicit: adding IFS= and -r to the read command ensures that each line is read unmodified (including leading and trailing whitespace). – mklement0 Feb 28 '15 at 22:54

Please try the following code:

while IFS= read -r line; do
    echo "$line"
done < file
  • 1
    Note that even as amended, this won't read from standard input, or from multiple files, so it isn't a complete answer to the question. (It is also surprising to see two edits in a matter of minutes more than 3 years after the answer was first submitted.) – Jonathan Leffler Mar 1 '15 at 0:07
  • @JonathanLeffler sorry for editing such an old (and not really good) answer… but I couldn't stand seeing this poor read without IFS= and -r, and the poor $line without its healthy quotes. – gniourf_gniourf Mar 1 '15 at 0:12
  • @gniourf_gniourf: I dislike the read -r notation. IMO, POSIX got that wrong; the option should enable the special meaning for trailing backslashes, not disable it — so that existing scripts (from before POSIX existed) would not break because the -r was omitted. I observe, however, that it was part of IEEE 1003.2 1992, which was the earliest version of the POSIX shell and utilities standard, but it was marked as an addition even then, so this is bitching about long-gone opportunities. I've never run into trouble because my code does not use -r; I must be lucky. Ignore me on this. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 1 '15 at 0:27
  • 1
    @JonathanLeffler I really agree that -r should be standard. I agree that it's unlikely to be in cases where not using it leads to trouble. Though, broken code is broken code. My edit was first triggered by that poor $line variable that badly missed its quotes. I fixed the read while I was at it. I didn't fix the echo because that's the kind of edit that gets rolled back. :(. – gniourf_gniourf Mar 1 '15 at 0:34

Code ${1:-/dev/stdin} will just understand first argument, so, how about this.

ARGS='$*'
if [ -z "$*" ]; then
  ARGS='-'
fi
eval "cat -- $ARGS" | while read line
do
   echo "$line"
done

The following works with standard sh (Tested with dash on Debian) and is quite readable, but that's a matter of taste:

if [ -n "$1" ]; then
    cat "$1"
else
    cat
fi | commands_and_transformations

Details: If the first parameter is non-empty then cat that file, else cat standard input. Then the output of the whole if statement is processed by the commands_and_transformations.

  • IMHO the best answer so because it points to the true solution: cat "${1:--}" | any_command. Reading to shell variables and echoing them may work for small files but does not scale so well. – Andreas Spindler Feb 7 '17 at 17:49
  • The [ -n "$1" ] can be simplified to [ "$1" ]. – agc May 1 '17 at 2:06

I don't find any of these answers acceptable. In particular, the accepted answer only handles the first command line parameter and ignores the rest. The Perl program that it is trying to emulate handles all the command line parameters. So the accepted answer doesn't even answer the question. Other answers use bash extensions, add unnecessary 'cat' commands, only work for the simple case of echoing input to output, or are just unnecessarily complicated.

However, I have to give them some credit because they gave me some ideas. Here is the complete answer:

#!/bin/sh

if [ $# = 0 ]
then
        DEFAULT_INPUT_FILE=/dev/stdin
else
        DEFAULT_INPUT_FILE=
fi

# Iterates over all parameters or /dev/stdin
for FILE in "$@" $DEFAULT_INPUT_FILE
do
        while IFS= read -r LINE
        do
                # Do whatever you want with LINE here.
                echo $LINE
        done < "$FILE"
done

I combined all of the above answers and created a shell function that would suit my needs. This is from a cygwin terminal of my 2 Windows10 machines where I had a shared folder between them. I need to be able to handle the following:

  • cat file.cpp | tx
  • tx < file.cpp
  • tx file.cpp

Where a specific filename is specified, I need to used the same filename during copy. Where input data stream has been piped thru, then i need to generate a temporary filename having the hour minute and seconds. The shared mainfolder has subfolders of the days of the week. This is for organizational purposes.

Behold, the ultimate script for my needs:

tx ()
{
  if [ $# -eq 0 ]; then
    local TMP=/tmp/tx.$(date +'%H%M%S')
    while IFS= read -r line; do
        echo "$line"
    done < /dev/stdin > $TMP
    cp $TMP //$OTHER/stargate/$(date +'%a')/
    rm -f $TMP
  else
    [ -r $1 ] && cp $1 //$OTHER/stargate/$(date +'%a')/ || echo "cannot read file"
  fi
}

If there is any way that you can see to further optimize this, I would like to know.

How about

for line in `cat`; do
    something($line);
done
  • 1
    Please add some details about your code. – emmanuel Sep 5 '14 at 21:16
  • The output of cat will be placed into the command line. The command line has a maximum size. Also this will not read line by line, but word by word. – Notinlist May 1 '17 at 11:16

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.