14

I'm attempting to set up our Blazor Server application to use a custom delegating handler that will attach a bearer token to all outgoing requests to our APIs. The delegating handler uses a token service that handles the retrieval of the token as well as the process for refreshing it if it's expired. The code looks like this:

public class HttpAuthorizationHandler : DelegatingHandler
{
    private ITokenService _tokenService { get; set; }

    public HttpAuthorizationHandler(ITokenService tokenService)
    {
        _tokenService = tokenService;
    }

    protected async override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        var token = await _tokenService.TryGetToken();

        request.Headers.Authorization = new System.Net.Http.Headers.AuthenticationHeaderValue("bearer", token);

        return await base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken);
    }
}

I've registered the token service as a scoped service in Startup.cs, with the understanding that the same instance of the service will stay alive in the DI container for the lifetime of the request. If I'm understanding that correctly, this means that I can assign the token values to the service in my App.razor page thusly and pick them up with any subsequent call to the token service:

@code {
  [Parameter]
  public string AccessToken { get; set; }
  [Parameter]
  public string RefreshToken { get; set; }

  [Inject] private ITokenService _tokenService { get; set; }

  protected override void OnInitialized()
  {
    _tokenService.AccessToken = AccessToken.NullIfEmpty() ?? _tokenService.AccessToken;
    _tokenService.RefreshToken = RefreshToken.NullIfEmpty() ?? _tokenService.RefreshToken;
  }

This seems to work just fine for everything except the delegating handler - the values turn up just fine in a scoped configuration for any other request made to the token service, but when injecting the token service into the delegating handler the token value always comes up null.

Access token in authorization handler comes up null

Unsurprisingly, if I register the service as a singleton, the values propagate to the delegating handler just fine, but that's obviously not a solution. For some reason the DI scope for the handler appears to be different from that of the rest of the application, and I have no idea why. Any ideas? Appreciate the help in advance.

EDIT

With some help from Simply Ged and Andrew Lock, I was able to get quite a bit closer using the IHttpContextAccessor to grab the instance of the ITokenService associated with the request. I was ecstatic when I first logged in and saw it working, but once my excitement wore down I noticed it would stop working correctly a short time later. It turns out that this method only synchronizes the instances on the initial request - after that time, the DI's awkward pipeline management kicks in and maintains the same service instance for every subsequent request, and they all fall out of alignment again. Here's an example of the debug logs from my testing:

App.razor:         e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 ┐
AuthStateProvider: e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 ├ Initial request - all IDs match
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 ┘
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 ┐
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 │
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 │
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 ├ Clicking around a bunch
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 │
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 │
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 ┘
App.razor:         cab70e54-1907-462d-8918-dbd771fabe76 ┐
AuthStateProvider: cab70e54-1907-462d-8918-dbd771fabe76 ├ Load a new page - ah, crap...
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 ┘
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 ┐
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 │
App.razor:         3c55ff9c-5511-40a1-9fb8-cd00f9fc11c6 │
AuthStateProvider: 3c55ff9c-5511-40a1-9fb8-cd00f9fc11c6 ├ Dang it all to heck
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 │
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 │
AuthHandler:       e12f6c80-5cee-44a0-a8a0-d6b783057339 ┘

Andrew Lock's excellent blog post on this topic goes into some very useful detail on why this kind of thing happens - apparently the dependency injection manages the lifetime of the http request pipelines separately from the lifetimes of the http clients themselves, so you can't rely on the pipeline being a part of the same context as the request. He proposes the use of the IHttpContextAccessor as a solution to this problem, but it does not appear to solve the problem in this particular case. I suspect his blog post refers to an earlier version of ASP.NET Core, the behavior of which is not applicable to Blazor apps. In fact, as Alex pointed out, Microsoft specifically advises against using the IHttpContextAccessor for shared state.

3
  • 2
    There is an excellent blog post that talks about this. TL;DR - You'll need to use IHttpContextAccessor to resolve the scoped service and get the instance you want.
    – Simply Ged
    Commented Nov 1, 2021 at 21:29
  • @SimplyGed - My friend, you are a bonafide hero. I did have to make it a point to use the HttpContextAccessor for each instance of my TokenService, including the App.razor page, but once I did that it worked perfectly.
    – Dumas.DED
    Commented Nov 2, 2021 at 17:25
  • @SimplyGed - I entreat you to make your comment an answer so I can mark it accordingly and give you due credit.
    – Dumas.DED
    Commented Nov 2, 2021 at 17:25

4 Answers 4

7

After several days of troubleshooting, I'm forced to concede that the delegating handler simply isn't a workable solution for this. Because the dependency injection manages the http request pipeline scopes completely separately from the http clients themselves, there's no reliable way to ensure that the pipeline has the same scope as the request, and even breaking protocol and using the IHttpContextAccessor doesn't solve the problem.

As a result I've ditched the delegating handler entirely and instead implemented a base class for all my services to inherit that handles the token acquisition in the constructor. That way I can inject the token service directly into the constructor and ensure that I'm getting the right scope.

public class ServiceBase
{
    public readonly HttpClient _HttpClient;

    public ServiceBase(HttpClient httpClient, ITokenService tokenService)
    {
        _HttpClient = httpClient;

        var token = tokenService.TryGetToken();

        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(token))
        {
            _HttpClient.DefaultRequestHeaders.Authorization = new AuthenticationHeaderValue("Bearer", token);
        }
        else
        {
            _HttpClient.DefaultRequestHeaders.Authorization = null;
        }
    }
}

It's not as spiffy as using the DI pipeline would be, but it's at least as clean and effective and so far it's working very well. As a wise man once (sort of) said, "There are alternatives to fighting [with dependency injection]."

2

As per the comment, there is an excellent blog post by Andrew Lock that talks about this.

TL;DR

You'll need to use IHttpContextAccessor to resolve the scoped service and get the instance you want.

Example

All credit for this example should be given to Andrew Lock and his blog post, but for quick reference readers of this question, you need to inject the IHttpContextAccessor into your DelegatingHandler and use that to access the correct scoped service.

public class ScopedMessageHander: DelegatingHandler
{
    private readonly ILogger<ScopedMessageHander> _logger;
    private readonly IHttpContextAccessor _accessor;

    public ScopedMessageHander(ILogger<ScopedMessageHander> logger, IHttpContextAccessor accessor)
    {
        _logger = logger;
        _accessor = accessor;
    }

    protected override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        // The HttpContext will be null if used outside a request context, so check in practice!
        var httpConext = _accessor.HttpContext;

        // retrieve the service from the Request DI Scope
        var service = _accessor.HttpContext.RequestServices.GetRequiredService<ScopedService>();

        ...
    }
}
5
  • 1
    This does not work for me. I still get a different instance in the DelegatingHandler from the HttpContext.RequestServices. Also Microsoft says "... for security reasons, you must not use IHttpContextAccessor within Blazor apps. Blazor apps run outside of the context of the ASP.NET Core pipeline. The HttpContext isn't guaranteed to be available within the IHttpContextAccessor, nor is it guaranteed to be holding the context that started the Blazor app." (learn.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/fundamentals/…).
    – Alex
    Commented Nov 7, 2021 at 13:00
  • 1
    Dang it all to heck. I spoke too soon. While using the IHttpContextAccessor does work on the very first request, the delegating handler still maintains the same instance with subsequent requests, which means even if the initial request lines up, they all become misaligned as soon as another request is made.
    – Dumas.DED
    Commented Nov 9, 2021 at 15:36
  • 1
    @Alex - I believe you're right. Andrew Lock's blog post appears to be referring to the earlier behavior in ASP.NET Core, and is not altogether applicable to Blazor apps.
    – Dumas.DED
    Commented Nov 9, 2021 at 15:39
  • @Simply Ged - It pains me to take this answer away from you. After this much bashing my head against the problem, though, I'm forced to conclude that the DelegatingHandler simply isn't a viable way to do what I'm trying to do. I've since implemented an alternative that avoids the DI's awkward pipeline management altogether. I'll document it accordingly.
    – Dumas.DED
    Commented Nov 9, 2021 at 15:42
  • How come this is OK? github.com/DuendeSoftware/Duende.AccessTokenManagement/blob/… It seems to be using IHttpContextAccessor. Or that it's not a Blazor Server app?
    – JamesL
    Commented Aug 10, 2022 at 20:08
2

As you have noticed, scoped services kind of magically turn Transient when they're used in DelegatingHandlers.

With a little bit of effort, you can create your own type of context that you scope to your request using AsyncLocal.

First, make a context with AsyncLocal.

class MyContextHolder : IMyContextHolder
{
  public readonly static AsyncLocal<string> Token = new AsyncLocal<string>();
}

Inject it in your DI as a singleton

services.AddSingleton<IMyContextHolder, MyContextHolder>();

Make a middleware that will use your ITokenService to populate the token in the MyContextHolder object.

public class TokenPopulationMiddleware
{
  public TokenPopulationMiddleware(ITokenService tokenService, IMyContextHolder myContextHolder)
  {
    _tokenService = tokenService;
    _myContextHolder = myContextHolder;
  }

  public async Task Invoke(HttpContext httpContext)
  {
    _myContextHolder.Token.Value = _tokenService.TryGetToken();
    await _next(context);
  }
}

Hook up the middleware

app.UseMiddleware<TokenPopulationMiddleware>();

then inject the IMyContextHolder into your DelegatingHandler instead of the ITokenService

public class HttpAuthorizationHandler : DelegatingHandler
{
    private ITokenService _tokenService { get; set; }

    public HttpAuthorizationHandler(IMyContextHolder myContextHolder)
    {
        _myContextHolder = myContextHolder;
    }

    protected async override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        var token = _myContextHolder.Token.Value;

        request.Headers.Authorization = new System.Net.Http.Headers.AuthenticationHeaderValue("bearer", token);

        return await base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken);
    }
}

With this implementation, you'll have to make the assumption that the token has already been populated in that variable, but with a bit of creativity, you may be able to just add a static AsyncLocal variable directly into your ITokenService.

In short, AsyncLocal gives you a way to scope variables to a request, just as a "Scoped" service would do. Just use a static AsyncLocal variable inside of a service with the Singleton lifetime, then you'll be able to inject Scoped data through to your delegating handlers.

5
  • This answer saved me! Thank you. AsyncLocals look very interesting. I notice they're used in HttpContextAccessor.
    – Grenville
    Commented Mar 24, 2023 at 9:02
  • How come your Token field is static yet you access as if its an instance field ? Commented Oct 30, 2023 at 10:48
  • This is problematic if you have multiple requests and the token is diffrent per request. One request might override the token that another request expect to be diffrent due to the singleton registration? Commented Nov 30, 2023 at 4:45
  • No, that's the magic of the AsyncLocal and the point of my answer. Another request is in a different AsyncContext so it will not interfere.
    – andrew
    Commented Nov 30, 2023 at 9:24
  • Are you sure this does not run into the exact same problems as IHttpContextAccessor, which is also based on AsyncLocal? See comments in stackoverflow.com/a/69818536/134761.
    – angularsen
    Commented May 29 at 8:21
1

I had a similar issue in Blazor Server where I wanted to add some HTTP headers to the request, the headers being relevant to the user making the request; a DelegatingHandler seemed appropriate. However, I obviously ran into the same problem with DI scopes - constructor injection just can't be relied on due to the different scopes, and you can't use the IHttpContextAccessor to get access to the IServiceProvider with Blazor. I solved the problem by passing through the object containing the necessary details in the Properties dictionary of the HttpRequestMessage e.g.

//where you make the request with HttpClient...
HttpRequestMessage request = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Post, url)
{
    Content = stringContent //stringContent contains body to post
};

request.Properties["MyProperty"] = userSpecificData;

HttpResponseMessage response = await httpClient.SendAsync(request);

And then in the DelegatingHandler, just pull out the data from the Properties:

protected override async Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
    UserData userData = request.Properties["MyProperty"] as UserData;

    //do whatever you need etc
    
    return await base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken);
}

This way you can still register your DelegatingHandler in Startup.cs through services.AddHttpClient(etc).AddHttpMessageHandler<MyHandler>() and use the IHttpClientFactory to get your HttpClient, and still pass in request specific data to the DelegatingHandler.

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