48

I want to create a function that will convert the days into milliseconds. The days format is stored as 0.2444, so how to convert this to milliseonds?

  • 10
    How many hours in a day? How many minutes in an hour? How many seconds in a minute? How many milliseconds in a second? – Rup Aug 8 '11 at 9:54
  • 1
    0.2444 what does it signifies ? – Jigar Joshi Aug 8 '11 at 9:55
  • 1
    tinyurl.com/3rjnoe7 – Bruno Reis Aug 8 '11 at 10:01
  • 6
    Oh and don't forget that some days are 25h, some 23h, and some even 23h59min59sec (leap second). – giraff Aug 8 '11 at 10:23
  • 1
    @giraff - a function that converts a fraction of a specific day to milliseconds has to take two arguments, or an implicit argument (like "today"). I have difficulty believing that it is what the OP's application really needs. (For example, nobody in their right mind would require a user to enter a fraction of a day into a timesheet taking account of the number of hours in the specific day. Now we don't know that's what the OP's application is, but ...) – Stephen C Aug 12 '11 at 7:46
193

The best practice for this, in my opinion is:

TimeUnit.DAYS.toMillis(1);     // 1 day to milliseconds.
TimeUnit.MINUTES.toMillis(23); // 23 minutes to milliseconds.
TimeUnit.HOURS.toMillis(4);    // 4 hours to milliseconds.
TimeUnit.SECONDS.toMillis(96); // 96 seconds to milliseconds.
  • 4
    This should be the accepted answer. – Kristy Welsh Apr 18 '16 at 22:37
  • 5
    No, this should not be accepted answer , because DAYS.toMillis takes only long argument and OP has days in double – Ľubomír Mar 8 '17 at 0:27
98

In addition to the other answers, there is also the TimeUnit class which allows you to convert one time duration to another. For example, to find out how many milliseconds make up one day:

TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.convert(1, TimeUnit.DAYS); //gives 86400000

Note that this method takes a long, so if you have a fraction of a day, you will have to multiply it by the number of milliseconds in one day.

17

Won't days * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000 suffice?

  • 1
    He probably wants it as a long, so you might need to round it from a double at the end too. – Rup Aug 8 '11 at 9:57
10

24 hours = 86400 seconds = 86400000 milliseconds. Just multiply your number with 86400000.

9

Its important to mention that once in 4-5 years this method might give a 1 second error, becase of a leap-second (http://www.nist.gov/pml/div688/leapseconds.cfm), and the correct formula for that day would be

(24*60*60 + 1) * 1000

There is a question Are leap seconds catered for by Calendar? and the answer is no.

So, if You're designing super time-dependant software, be careful about this formula.

  • 1
    Just if someone is interested — there is going to be a leap second in 2016 – Rustem Mustafin Jul 20 '16 at 9:18
4
public static double toMilliSeconds(double day)
{
    return day * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000;
}

or as long:

public static long toMilliSeconds(double day)
{
    return (long) (day * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000);
}

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.