1

I have been tasked with finding a solution to a problem involving forecasting percentages. The main issue I have is a lack of data. I only have 2.5 years' worth of data (weekly) and need to predict the rest of the year's percentages.

The data I have looked similar to the below:

    week  year    date          percentage
1   1     2019    2019-03-31    0.1068
2   2     2019    2019-04-07    0.0954
3   3     2019    2019-04-14    0.0845
4   4     2019    2019-04-21    0.0713
5   5     2019    2019-04-28    0.0762
6   6     2019    2019-05-05    0.0671

The percentages do express some seasonality, due to their nature but with some EDA it is not enough to class as a completely seasonal dataset.

I have initially attempted to use a lstm / keras sequential model, but this has proved unsuccessful.

I'm not familiar with any method that could work with this type of data so if anyone has any thoughts on how best to approach this task would be well received.

2
  • take a look at the prophet-package
    – Wimpel
    Commented Nov 3, 2021 at 9:07
  • 1
    It depends on the domain. If this is economic data then it's going to be difficult to predict with any accuracy from the last two years. If it is something that hasn't been affected by the pandemic, you're unlikely to get much better than taking the average of the two percentages from the same time point in the previous two years. (Or even an average of the rolling means at the same time point in the last two years). Commented Nov 3, 2021 at 9:19

1 Answer 1

3

You can start with the fable package and its environment. Note that's an example and keep in mind results could be not interesting with the sample data you give.

library(fable)
library(tsibble)  

# convert as date
df$date <- as.Date(df$date, "%Y-%m-%d")

# as tsibble, a type of data.frame very useful for tsibble environment, it
# helps a lot also if you have many ts to forecast
df <- tsibble(df, index = date)

# divide data in train and test: this is going to help you which model is 
# good to forecast, forecasting something you already know.
train <- df[df$date <  as.Date('2019-04-21',"%Y-%m-%d"),]
test  <- df[df$date >= as.Date('2019-04-21',"%Y-%m-%d"),]

# here you forecast, replace |> with %>% in case your R does not support it
# (maybe you'll library(magrittr) in case)
training <- train |> 
              # define models, you can put many
              model(arima   = ARIMA(percentage),
                    croston = CROSTON(percentage))
training
    # A mable: 1 x 2
           arima   croston
         <model>   <model>
1 <ARIMA(0,2,0)> <croston>


forecasting <- training |> 
              # forecast ahead of 3
              forecast(h = 3)

# here you see your result (does not put because with those data it's quite
# useless
autoplot(forecasting) + autolayer(train)

# and some accuracy metrics
accuracy(forecasting, test) 
# A tibble: 2 x 10
  .model  .type       ME   RMSE    MAE   MPE  MAPE  MASE RMSSE   ACF1
  <chr>   <chr>    <dbl>  <dbl>  <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>  <dbl>
1 arima   Test   0.00883 0.0119 0.0104  12.4  14.6   NaN   NaN -0.116
2 croston Test  -0.0184  0.0188 0.0184 -26.1  26.1   NaN   NaN -0.525

Obviously you'll choose for each ts the best model (in this case, one ts), and forward it to predict what you need.

In this simple case, it seems the best an ARIMA(0,2,0), so you can do something like this, but you can find in the guides very better ways to forward:

df |> model(arima_0_2_0 = ARIMA(percentage ~ 0  + pdq(0,2,0))) |> forecast(h = 10)

Some of the models allow you to put regressors, so you can try to model also "weird" periods like covid lockdowns, holidays, and whatever, if needed.


With data:

df <- read.table(text = '
week  year    date          percentage
1   1     2019    2019-03-31    0.1068
2   2     2019    2019-04-07    0.0954
3   3     2019    2019-04-14    0.0845
4   4     2019    2019-04-21    0.0713
5   5     2019    2019-04-28    0.0762
6   6     2019    2019-05-05    0.0671', header = T)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.