1

I'm trying to make a simple command line interface, but i'm having a probleme for parsing commands :

process_t is a structure contient the path of the command with arguments to be stored in the variable argv.

int parse_cmd(char* tokens[], process_t* commands) {
    assert(tokens!=NULL);
    assert(commands!=NULL);
    
    int position = 0;
    int commandNumber = 0;
        
    for(int i=0; tokens[i] != NULL; i++){
        if(is_reserved(tokens[i]) == 0 && tokens[i+1] != NULL) continue;
        int end = is_reserved(tokens[i]) == 0 ? i+1 : i;
        int argc = position;
        int count = 0;
        
        process_t newProcess;

        char* argv[MAX_CMD_SIZE] = {NULL};
        for(argc; argc < end; argc++) {
            argv[count] = tokens[argc];
            count = count + 1;
        }
        newProcess.path = tokens[position];
        newProcess.argv = argv;
        position = i + 1;
        commands[commandNumber] = newProcess;
        commandNumber = commandNumber + 1;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {

    char path[MAX_LINE_SIZE];
    char line[MAX_LINE_SIZE];
    char* cmdline[MAX_CMD_SIZE];
    process_t cmds[MAX_CMD_SIZE];

    getcwd(path, MAX_LINE_SIZE);
    while (1) {
  
        printf("mini@shell:%s$ ", path);
        scanf("%[^\n]%*c", line);
        
        trim(line);
        clean(line);
        tokenize(line, cmdline);
        
        parse_cmd(cmdline, cmds);
        toString(cmds);
        
        break;.
    }
    return -1;
}

Input: ls -l ; grep ^a


Why the array contain only the value of argv of the last iteration ?


Output :

path : ls => argv = {grep, ^a, (null)} path : grep => argv = {grep, ^a, (null)}


3
  • 1
    My guess: you need to make copies of the tokens, e.g. with strdup. See minimal reproducible example. Nov 4, 2021 at 18:40
  • Yeah, the title almost screams 'copying a pointer instead of the char array pointed at'. Probably 'newProcess.path = tokens[position];' :( Nov 4, 2021 at 19:06
  • 1
    @MartinJames the path is stored in 'newProcess' as you can see in the output, but the argv array just like it takes the last argv array in for loop and give it to all the other process Nov 4, 2021 at 19:17

2 Answers 2

1

You're trying to use the block-local array argv, which is recreated for every command and, what's worse, doesn't even exist any longer after parse_cmd has returned. An array object with sufficient lifetime has to be used; you can do this by changing

        char* argv[MAX_CMD_SIZE] = {NULL};

to

        char **argv = calloc(end-position+1, sizeof *argv);

Note that you'd have to free this object when no longer needed.

Also note that you forgot to return commandNumber; from parse_cmd; without that, you have no way of knowing how many commands were found.

1
1

I found also a way without even need to copy the local array that i declared, just by changing the value of the index that contain the reserved character.

So the tokens will be like this : {« ls », « -l », NULL, « grep », « ^a », NULL}

int parse_cmd(char* tokens[], process_t* commands) {
    assert(tokens!=NULL);
    assert(commands!=NULL);
    
    int position = 0;
    int commandNumber = 0;
    
    for(int i=0; tokens[i] != NULL; i++){
        if(is_reserved(tokens[i]) == 0 && tokens[i+1] != NULL) continue;
        int end = is_reserved(tokens[i]) == 0 ? i+1 : i;
        
        commands[commandNumber].path = tokens[position];
        commands[commandNumber].argv = &tokens[position];
        commands[commandNumber].next = &commands[commandNumber]+1;
        tokens[end] = NULL;
        commandNumber = commandNumber + 1;
        position = i + 1;
    }
    return 0;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.