1

How can I run a dynamic LINQ query on a collection of a base type (like the IPerson interface) but access implementation specific properties (like Age).

I can be sure that all items in the collection are the same, i.e. looking at the first type I can assume that the others are the same.

I need this for a UI that can apply filters to different collections, the user sees all available properties.

Here's an example of what I'd like to do, the Expression.Call method throws an exception:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
using System.Linq.Dynamic;
using DynamicExpression = System.Linq.Dynamic.DynamicExpression;

namespace DynamicLinqTest
{
    public interface IPerson
    {
        string Name { get; set; }
    }
    public class Person : IPerson
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int Age { get; set; }
        public double Income { get; set; }
    }

    class Program
    {
        public static IEnumerable<Person> GetPersons()
        {
            yield return new Person { Name = "Sam", Age = 26, Income = 50000 };
            yield return new Person { Name = "Rick", Age = 27, Income = 0 };
            yield return new Person { Name = "Joe", Age = 45, Income = 35000 };
            yield return new Person { Name = "Bill", Age = 31, Income = 40000 };
            yield return new Person { Name = "Fred", Age = 56, Income = 155000 };
        } 

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            IEnumerable<IPerson> persons = GetPersons();
            var personsQueriable = persons.AsQueryable();

            //what I would like to do:
            // personsQueriable.Where("Age > 30");

            var l = DynamicExpression.ParseLambda(persons.First().GetType(), typeof(bool), "Age > 30");
            var filtered = personsQueriable.Provider.CreateQuery(
                Expression.Call(
                    typeof(Queryable), "Where",
                    new Type[] { persons.First().GetType() },
                    personsQueriable.Expression, Expression.Quote(l)));

            ObjectDumper.Write(filtered);
            Console.Read();
        }
    }
}
2

You are generating the following code:

persons.Where((Person p) => p.Age > 30)

persons is of type IEnumerable<IPerson>, which can't be cast to IEnumerable<Person>. What you want is to add a call to Queryable.Cast to cast the IPerson objects to Person:

persons.Cast<Person>().Where(p => p.Age > 30)

Use the following code:

var castedQueryable = personsQueriable.Provider.CreateQuery(
    Expression.Call(
        typeof(Queryable), "Cast",
        new Type[] { persons.First().GetType() },
        personsQueriable.Expression));

var l = DynamicExpression.ParseLambda(persons.First().GetType(), typeof(bool), "Age > 30");
var filtered = personsQueriable.Provider.CreateQuery(
    Expression.Call(
        typeof(Queryable), "Where",
        new Type[] { persons.First().GetType() },
        castedQueryable.Expression, Expression.Quote(l)));

However, note that you're in fact enumerating four times persons here. If it comes from a list, it doesn't have much impact. If the original enumerable comes from a database query, you might want to make sure you're enumerating it only once. Get the results inside a list, then make sure all the First calls and expressions are applied on it.

| improve this answer | |
  • Sweet solution! I was getting on that track too, but I didn't know how to do it. Thanks so much! I was aware of the issue with the multiple enumeration, I just made sure that the example is as simple as possible. – lukebuehler Aug 8 '11 at 19:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.