144

I'm using React Router v6 and am creating private routes for my application.

In file PrivateRoute.js, I've the code

import React from 'react';
import {Route,Navigate} from "react-router-dom";
import {isauth}  from 'auth'

function PrivateRoute({ element, path }) {
  const authed = isauth() // isauth() returns true or false based on localStorage
  const ele = authed === true ? element : <Navigate to="/Home"  />;
  return <Route path={path} element={ele} />;
}

export default PrivateRoute

And in file route.js I've written as:

 ...
<PrivateRoute exact path="/" element={<Dashboard/>}/>
<Route exact path="/home" element={<Home/>}/>

I've gone through the same example React-router Auth Example - StackBlitz, file App.tsx

Is there something I'm missing?

0

17 Answers 17

152

I ran into the same issue today and came up with the following solution based on this very helpful article by Andrew Luca

In PrivateRoute.js:

import React from 'react';
import { Navigate, Outlet } from 'react-router-dom';

const PrivateRoute = () => {
    const auth = null; // determine if authorized, from context or however you're doing it

    // If authorized, return an outlet that will render child elements
    // If not, return element that will navigate to login page
    return auth ? <Outlet /> : <Navigate to="/login" />;
}

In App.js (I've left in some other pages as examples):

import './App.css';
import React, {Fragment} from 'react';
import {BrowserRouter as Router, Route, Routes} from 'react-router-dom';
import Navbar from './components/layout/Navbar';
import Home from './components/pages/Home';
import Register from './components/auth/Register'
import Login from './components/auth/Login';
import PrivateRoute from './components/routing/PrivateRoute';

const App = () => {
  return (
    <Router>
      <Fragment>
        <Navbar/>
        <Routes>
          <Route exact path='/' element={<PrivateRoute/>}>
            <Route exact path='/' element={<Home/>}/>
          </Route>
          <Route exact path='/register' element={<Register/>}/>
          <Route exact path='/login' element={<Login/>}/>
        </Routes>
      </Fragment>
    </Router>
    
  );
}

In the above routing, this is the private route:

<Route exact path='/' element={<PrivateRoute/>}>
      <Route exact path='/' element={<Home/>}/>
</Route>

If authorization is successful, the element will show. Otherwise, it will navigate to the login page.

6
  • 2
    Ah, I read that blog and it makes much more sense now to simply render <Route element={<Home/>} /> as the child of the private outlet. This is a bit more appealing now. I can see the benefits in certain use cases.
    – Drew Reese
    Nov 7, 2021 at 6:56
  • 15
    If using latest version, exact attribute not required. Nov 11, 2021 at 18:09
  • 1
    @DrewReese is there some sort of built in Auth component? I'm no expert in React so I'm curious to see other solutions. In my understanding the PrivateRoute component in this example acts as an Auth component Nov 12, 2021 at 21:11
  • 1
    @DrewReese just realized you're talking about the additional route inside the route. If Home was the only page requiring authorization, then you're correct, the child route isn't necessary. If several routes require the same authentication, then putting them all within the same PrivateRoute is convenient. Nov 12, 2021 at 21:16
  • 2
    @DallinRomney In React, no, React alone is rather unopinionated when it comes to auth implementations, but any libraries used can certainly provide their own auth containers/wrapper. And that is the appealing part. :) It's effectively the same pattern I used in v5 and what I called a "Golden Gate" route that was a singular point of auth access into a "Walled Garden" of routes that each individually didn't need the auth check now.
    – Drew Reese
    Nov 12, 2021 at 21:20
52

Only Route components can be a child of Routes. If you follow the v6 docs then you'll see the authentication pattern is to use a wrapper component to handle the authentication check and redirect.

function RequireAuth({ children }: { children: JSX.Element }) {
  let auth = useAuth();
  let location = useLocation();

  if (!auth.user) {
    // Redirect them to the /login page, but save the current location they were
    // trying to go to when they were redirected. This allows us to send them
    // along to that page after they login, which is a nicer user experience
    // than dropping them off on the home page.
    return <Navigate to="/login" state={{ from: location }} />;
  }

  return children;
}

...

<Route
  path="/protected"
  element={
    <RequireAuth>
      <ProtectedPage />
    </RequireAuth>
  }
/>

The old v5 pattern of create custom Route components no longer works. An updated v6 pattern using your code/logic could look as follows:

const PrivateRoute = ({ children }) => {
  const authed = isauth() // isauth() returns true or false based on localStorage
  
  return authed ? children : <Navigate to="/Home" />;
}

And to use

<Route
  path="/dashboard"
  element={
    <PrivateRoute>
      <Dashboard />
    </PrivateRoute>
  }
/>
4
  • 3
    Dallin's answer is nice, but to be honest doesn't save you much of anything over just wrapping the target component with an auth component. If anything it's a more complex solution since it now involves rendering two Route components and an Outlet just to render a single path.
    – Drew Reese
    Nov 7, 2021 at 6:49
  • 2
    Thank you this was my solution and it worked. Nov 7, 2021 at 13:44
  • @DrewReese, I think the advantage of Dallin's answer comes into play when you have many routes that need to be protected. So with only one protected route, yeah it doesn't really make any sense, but what about 5 or 20? It starts to save on not requiring a bunch of redundant wrapper components.
    – MikeyT
    Jan 6 at 7:38
  • @MikeyT Totally agree, see comments under his answer. Mine was initially essentially taken straight from the official docs, for protecting a single component. When addressing these sorts of questions I typically cover both use cases now.
    – Drew Reese
    Jan 6 at 16:17
22

Complement to reduce lines of code, make it more readable and beautiful.

This could just be a comment but I don't have enough points, so I'll put it as an answer.

Dallin's answer works but Drew's answer is better! And just to complete Drew's answer on aesthetics, I recommend creating a private component that takes components as props instead of children.

Very basic example of private routes file/component:

import { Navigate } from 'react-router-dom';

const Private = (Component) => {
    const auth = false; //your logic

    return auth ? <Component /> : <Navigate to="/login" />
}

Route file example:

<Routes>
    <Route path="/home" element={<Home />} />
    <Route path="/user" element={<Private Component={User} />} />
</Routes>
3
  • 8
    It worked for me, I just had to change const Private = (Component) => TO const Private = ({Component}) => Jan 27 at 2:36
  • What happens when you want to pass props to Component? You could make it take JSX like the element prop, i.e. Component={<User myProp />} but you'd basically be back where you started with the element prop and you'd be better to just wrap <User myProp /> with the Private component. The entire point of the element JSX syntax of the Route is the route doesn't need to concern itself is passing anything to the component it is rendering.
    – Drew Reese
    Sep 13 at 23:24
8

I know that this is not exactly the recipe on how to make PirvateRoute work, but I just wanted to mention that the new documentation recommends a slightly different approach to handle this pattern with react-router v6:

<Route path="/protected" element={<RequireAuth><ProtectedPage /></RequireAuth>} />
import { Navigate, useLocation } from "react-router";

export const RequireAuth: React.FC<{ children: JSX.Element }> = ({ children }) => {
  let auth = useAuth();
  let location = useLocation();

  if (!auth.user) {
    return <Navigate to="/login" state={{ from: location }} />;
  }

  return children;
};

And you are supposed to add more routes inside ProtectedPage itself if you need it.

See the documentation and an example for more details. Also, check this note by Michael Jackson that goes into some implementation details.

0
6

Just set your router component to element prop:

<Routes>
  <Route exact path="/" element={<Home />} />
  <Route path="/about" element={<About />} />
  <Route path="/dashboard" element={<Dashboard />} />
</Routes>

You can also check for upgrading from v5.

1
  • 6
    It doesn't anwser the question, what about authenticating? Jan 27 at 21:30
3

React Router v6, some syntactic sugar:

{auth && (
  privateRoutes.map(route =>
    <Route
      path={route.path}
      key={route.path}
      element={auth.isAuthenticated ? <route.component /> : <Navigate to={ROUTE_WELCOME_PAGE} replace />}
    />
  )
)}
1
  • 5
    Syntactic sugar in what way? How does it solve the problem? An explanation would be in order. E.g., what is the idea/gist? From the Help Center: "...always explain why the solution you're presenting is appropriate and how it works". Please respond by editing (changing) your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Jan 5 at 2:53
2

I tried all answers, but it always displayed the error:

Error: [PrivateRoute] is not a component. All component children of must be a or <React.Fragment>

But I found a solution ))) -

In PrivateRoute.js file:

import React from "react"; import { Navigate } from "react-router-dom";
import {isauth}  from 'auth'

const PrivateRoute = ({ children }) => {
  const authed = isauth()

  return authed ? children : <Navigate to={"/Home" /> };

export default ProtectedRoute;

In the route.js file:

<Route
  path="/"
  element={
    <ProtectedRoute >
      <Dashboard/>
    </ProtectedRoute>
  }
/>
<Route exact path="/home" element={<Home/>}/>
1

Remove the PrivateRoute component from your project and use the following code in your App.js files:

import {Navigate} from "react-router-dom";
import {isauth}  from 'auth'

...

<Route exact path="/home" element={<Home/>}/>
<Route exact path="/" element={isauth ? <Dashboard/> : <Navigate to="/Home"  />}/>
1

If you are using a second file to work on your index.js, here is a simpler code snippet that may help others understand better. It is pretty straightforward and you do not require "exact" and "switch" to change between the paths thanks to the new version.

File index.js

import React from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";

import { BrowserRouter } from "react-router-dom";

import "./index.css";
import App from "./App";

ReactDOM.render(
  <BrowserRouter>
    <App />
  </BrowserRouter>,
  document.getElementById("root")
);

File App.js

Note that you need to import { Routes, Route } instead of { Route } (as it was in previous versions). Also, note that in the App.js file, it is not necessary to import BrowserRouter again.

import { Routes, Route } from "react-router-dom";

import AllPages from "./pages/AllPages";
import NewContactsPage from "./pages/ContactsPage";
import FavoritesPage from "./pages/Favorites";

function App() {

  return (
    <div>
      <Routes>
        <Route path="/" element={<AllPages />} />
        <Route path="/new-contacts" element={<NewContactsPage />} />
        <Route path="/favorites" element={<FavoritesPage />} />
      </Routes>
    </div>
  );
}

export default App;
1

This is the simple way to create a private route:

import React from 'react'
import { Navigate } from 'react-router-dom'
import { useAuth } from '../../context/AuthContext'

export default function PrivateRoute({ children }) {
  const { currentUser } = useAuth()

  if (!currentUser) {
    return <Navigate to='/login' />
  }

  return children;
}

Now if we want to add a private route to the Dashboard component we can apply this private route as below:

<Routes>
  <Route exact path="/" element={<PrivateRoute><Dashboard /></PrivateRoute>} />
</Routes>
0

For longer elements

        <Router>
        <div>
            <Navbar totalItems={cart.total_items}/>
            <Routes>
                <Route exact path='/'>
                    <Route exact path='/' element={<Products products={products} onAddToCart={handleAddToCart}/>}/>
                </Route>
                <Route exact path='/cart'>
                    <Route exact path='/cart' element={<Cart cart={cart}/>}/>     
                </Route>
            </Routes>
        </div>
    </Router>
2
  • 2
    An explanation would be in order. E.g., what is the idea/gist? From the Help Center: "...always explain why the solution you're presenting is appropriate and how it works". Please respond by editing (changing) your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Jan 5 at 2:54
  • 2
    See "Explaining entirely code-based answers". While this might be technically correct it doesn't explain why it solves the problem or should be the selected answer. We should educate in addition to help solve the problem. Jan 22 at 8:56
0

Header will stay on all page

import React from 'react';

import {
  BrowserRouter,
  Routes,
  Route
} from "react-router-dom";

const Header = () => <h2>Header</h2>
const Dashboard = () => <h2>Dashboard</h2>
const SurveyNew = () => <h2>SurveyNew</h2>
const Landing = () => <h2>Landing</h2>


const App = () =>{
  return (
    <div>
      <BrowserRouter>
        <Header />
        <Routes >
        <Route exact path="/" element={<Landing />} />
        <Route path="/surveys" element={<Dashboard />}  />
        <Route path="/surveys/new" element={<SurveyNew/>}  />
        </Routes>
      </BrowserRouter>
    </div>
  );
};
export default App;
3
  • An explanation would be in order. E.g., what is the idea/gist? What do you mean by "Header will stay on all page"? Do you mean "Header will stay on all pages"? Or something else? From the Help Center: "...always explain why the solution you're presenting is appropriate and how it works". Please respond by editing (changing) your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Jan 5 at 2:55
  • Text header is fixed on all page you can put navbar or etc..
    – Rafale jam
    Jan 10 at 20:41
  • What did I write about not here in comments? Aug 17 at 14:43
0
<Route path='/' element={<Navigate to="/search" />} />
0

You can use a function for a private route:

<Route exact path="/login" element={NotAuth(Login)} />
<Route exact path="/Register" element={NotAuth(Register)} />

function NotAuth(Component) {
  if (isAuth)
    return <Navigate to="/" />;
  return <Component />;
}
0

I'm using "react-router-dom": "^6.3.0" and this is how I did mine

PrivateRoute Component and Route

   import {Route} from "react-router-dom";

    const PrivateRoute = ({ component: Compontent, authenticated }) => {
      return authenticated ? <Compontent /> : <Navigate to="/" />;
    }
    
    <Route 
          path="/user/profile" 
          element={<PrivateRoute authenticated={true} component={Profile} />} />
-1

For the error "[Navigate] is not a <Route> component. All component children of <Routes> must be a <Route> or <React.Fragment>", use the following method maybe solved:

DefaultPage is when no match router. Jump to the DefaultPage. Here use the <Route index element={} /> to replace the

<Navigate to={window.location.pathname + '/kanban'}/>

See Index Routes

<Routes>

      <Route path={'/default'} element={<DefaultPage/>}/>

      <Route path={'/second'}  element={<SecondPage/>}/>

{/* <Navigate to={window.location.pathname + '/kanban'}/> */}
      <Route index element={<DefaultPage/>} />

</Routes>
1
-4
import { BrowserRouter as Router, Routes, Route, Link } from "react-router-dom";

function App() {
  return (
      <Router>
          <Routes>
            <Route path="/" element={<h1>home page</h1>} />
            <Route path="/seacrch" element={<h1>seacrch page</h1>} />
          </Routes>
      </Router>
  );
}

export default App;
3
  • 1
    As it’s currently written, your answer is unclear. Please edit to add additional details that will help others understand how this addresses the question asked. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Dec 3, 2021 at 8:13
  • An explanation would be in order. E.g., what is the idea/gist? From the Help Center: "...always explain why the solution you're presenting is appropriate and how it works". Please respond by editing (changing) your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Jan 5 at 2:55
  • 2
    It doesn't answer the question. Jan 27 at 21:35

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