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I'm going through some code from this article about ECS-systems in game programming and trying to understand it, and something I'm seeing a lot is using heap memory in places where it seems like there is no benefit in doing so. Take this as an example:

class ECS
{
public:
    void someFunction()
    {
        archetypes.push_back(new Archetype);
    }
    ~ECS()
    {
        for(Archetype* a : archetypes_)
        {
            delete a;
        }
    }
private:
    std::vector<Archetype*> archetypes_;
};

This is the only way that the archetypes are manipulated in memory in the code. There is also no polymorphism involved here whatsoever. The archetypes being on the heap here has seemingly no impact on the code other than the fact that the archetypes are referenced by pointers.

Why would you ever choose to use allocated memory for this? I see this often in code and it seems to me like using heap memory just because it feels like the right thing to do, and not actually considering if it's the appropriate place for it. std::vector already uses heap memory behind the scenes so why not just copy a stack variable into the vector when we want to add a new archetype, and let the vector handle the allocation?

class ECS
{
public:
    void someFunction()
    {
        archetypes.push_back(Archetype());
    }
private:
    std::vector<Archetype> archetypes_;
};

Or are there valid reasons for using heap memory in cases like this?

7
  • 1
    Maybe Archetype is a base type and you want to support polymorphism. But in that case you would use std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Archetype>>. Nov 6, 2021 at 21:39
  • 3
    Another possible reason would be if the objects are non-copyable, or if you wanted to move ownership of the object into and out of the vector without copying the object (although in c+11 and later you could use move-assignment to get the same effect in most cases) Nov 6, 2021 at 21:46
  • 1
    Pimpl idiom may be a reason. You decouple the ECS code from the Archetype code.
    – rturrado
    Nov 6, 2021 at 21:46
  • 1
    @rturrado Normally you would put instances of the facade type into a vector, nobody but the facade should even be aware of the pimpl pointer. Nov 6, 2021 at 21:49
  • 2
    The code is handing out Archetype* pointers, e.g. in Archetype* ECS::GetArchetype(const ArchetypeID& id). If you had std::vector<Archetype>, and handed out a pointer to its element, that pointer could become invalid if another archetype is later added to the vector. Maybe pointer stability is what the author was after. Nov 6, 2021 at 21:54

1 Answer 1

4

The obbious reason would be that you don't want the data items to be moved/copied when the vector grows,

There may be several reasons for that, one is that the types are expensive (or even impossible) to move/copy, another is that you don't want pointers to the individual archetypes to be invalidated by changes to the vector,

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