I know in Java we can create an instance of a Class by new, clone(), Reflection and by serializing and de-serializing.

I have create a simple class implementing a Singleton.

And I need stop all the way one can create instance of my Class.

public class Singleton implements Serializable{
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 3119105548371608200L;
    private static final Singleton singleton = new Singleton();
    private Singleton() { }
    public static Singleton getInstance(){
        return singleton;
    }
    @Override
    protected Object clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException {
        throw new CloneNotSupportedException("Cloning of this class is not allowed"); 
    }
    protected Object readResolve() {
        return singleton;
    }
    //-----> This is my implementation to stop it but Its not working. :(
    public Object newInstance() throws InstantiationException {
        throw new InstantiationError( "Creating of this object is not allowed." );
    }
}

In this Class I have managed to stop the class instance by new, clone() and serialization, But am unable to stop it by Reflection.

My Code for creating the object is

try {
    Class<Singleton> singletonClass = (Class<Singleton>) Class.forName("test.singleton.Singleton");
    Singleton singletonReflection = singletonClass.newInstance();
} catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (InstantiationException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

11 Answers 11

up vote 46 down vote accepted

Try creating your public constructor

private Singleton() {
    if( Singleton.singleton != null ) {
        throw new InstantiationError( "Creating of this object is not allowed." );
    }
}
  • 2
    Wow ... great minds think alike ... 3 answers almost identical ... hysterical. – Dave G Aug 9 '11 at 10:02
  • 1
    Now problem for me, Which Answer to Accept :) – Talha Ahmed Khan Aug 9 '11 at 10:04
  • 1
    I'd say this one because the excepception thrown is the most appropriate (InstanciationError). – Robert Bossy Aug 9 '11 at 10:10
  • I have exactly the same thing in my mind :) – Talha Ahmed Khan Aug 9 '11 at 10:13
  • 4
    There is a flaw in this approach, by which what if we create the instance using reflection before any getInstance invocation(with lazy init)? Reflection is still allowed to proceed as the static variable is still null at that time. – ring bearer Jun 16 '15 at 19:22

Define the singleton like this:

public enum Singleton {
    INSTANCE
}
  • Enum is a sure shot gaurantee against Reflection,clone and serialization-deserialization – Kumar Abhinav Aug 13 '14 at 10:50
  • But ENUM has it's restriction. I am actually looking for a solution which is apart from ENUM – Diganta Jun 27 '17 at 9:01
  • 1
    @Diganta what restrictions? – JerryGoyal Sep 2 '17 at 13:10
  • Enum is the cleanest way of providing singleton behavior in Java, bar none. As Kumar Abhinav stated, it provides these guarantees in the simplest, least error prone way. – Tom Drake Jan 21 at 2:04

How about checking in the constructor:

private Singleton() {
    if (singleton != null) {
        throw new IllegalStateException("Singleton already constructed");
    }
}

Of course, this may not really stop it - if someone is messing around with reflection to access private members, they may be able to set the field to null themselves. You have to ask yourself just what you're trying to prevent though, and how worthwhile it is.

(EDIT: As Bozho mentioned, final fields may not be settable even via reflection. I wouldn't be surprised if there were some way of doing it via JNI etc though... if you give folks enough access, they'll be able to do almost anything...)

  • I think final fields can't be modified with reflection – Bozho Aug 9 '11 at 10:06
  • @Bozho: Ooh yes, you could be right. Will edit. – Jon Skeet Aug 9 '11 at 10:06
  • hey - the right way is the enum one - see : stackoverflow.com/a/71399/281545. Actually item 77 of effective java 2nd edition demonstrates a (too technical for me) attack via deserialization that would probably beat this constructor (?) – Mr_and_Mrs_D Sep 28 '13 at 18:14
  • This approach will not work if we create object first reflection, like this String className = "Singleton"; Class<Singleton> aClass = (Class<Singleton>) Class.forName(className); Constructor<?> declaredConstructor = aClass.getDeclaredConstructor(); declaredConstructor.setAccessible(true); Singleton instance1 = (Singleton) declaredConstructor.newInstance(); print("instance1", instance1.hashCode()); Singleton instance2 = Singleton.getInstance(); print("instance2", instance2.hashCode()); both have different hashcode – Hrishikesh Mishra Apr 7 '17 at 8:37
private Singleton() { 
    if (Singleton.singleton != null) {
        throw new RuntimeException("Can't instantiate singleton twice");
    }
}

Another thing you should watch is the readResolve(..) method, because your class implements Serialiable. There you should return the existing instance.

But the easiest way to use singletons is through enums - you don't worry about these things.

  • Luckily I have already implemented the readResolve() method. – Talha Ahmed Khan Aug 9 '11 at 10:07
  • 1
    This approach will not work if we create object first reflection, like this String className = "Singleton"; Class<Singleton> aClass = (Class<Singleton>) Class.forName(className); Constructor<?> declaredConstructor = aClass.getDeclaredConstructor(); declaredConstructor.setAccessible(true); Singleton instance1 = (Singleton) declaredConstructor.newInstance(); print("instance1", instance1.hashCode()); Singleton instance2 = Singleton.getInstance(); print("instance2", instance2.hashCode()); both have different hashcode – Hrishikesh Mishra Apr 7 '17 at 8:37
  • @HrishikeshMishra: Nope, when you call the constructor via reflection it throws an exception. I've just tried your code, and it threw an exception as expected... – Jon Skeet Apr 7 '17 at 8:41
  • 1
    @JonSkeet, it will work of egger initialization but will not lazy. try out. – Hrishikesh Mishra Apr 7 '17 at 17:54
  • @HrishikeshMishra: Don't know what you mean by that, but I tried the exact code you showed. Note that the class will be initialized before you get to call the constructor, in any reasonable VM... – Jon Skeet Apr 7 '17 at 18:55

As an alternative to the singleton, you could take a look at the monostate pattern. Then, instantiation of your class is not a problem anymore, and you don't have to worry about any of the scenarios you listed.

In the monostate pattern, all the fields in your class are static. That means that all instances of the class share the same state, just like with a singleton. Moreover, this fact is transparent to the callers; they don't need to know about special methods like getInstance, they simply create instances and work with them.

But, just like with singleton, it's a form of hidden global state; which is very bad.

I Thing Below code will work ..

class Test {

    static private Test t = null;
    static {
        t = new Test();
    }

    private Test(){}

    public static Test getT() {
        return t;
    }

    public String helloMethod() {
        return "Singleton Design Pattern";
    }
}


public class MethodMain {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test t = Test.getT();
        System.out.println(t.helloMethod());
    }
}

output : Singleton Design Pattern

We can break it using static nested class

Please follow below code its 100% correct, i tested

package com.singleton.breakable;

import java.io.Serializable;

class SingletonImpl implements Cloneable, Serializable {

    public static SingletonImpl singleInstance = null;

    private SingletonImpl() {

    }

    @Override
    protected Object clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException {
        return singleInstance;
    };

    public Object readResolve() {
        return SingletonImpl.getInstance(); // 
    }

    public static SingletonImpl getInstance() {

        if (null == singleInstance) {
            singleInstance = new SingletonImpl();
        }
        return singleInstance;
    }

}


package com.singleton.breakable;

import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.ObjectInputStream;
import java.io.ObjectOutputStream;
import java.lang.reflect.Constructor;

class FullySingletonClass {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        SingletonImpl object1 = SingletonImpl.getInstance();
        System.out.println("Object1:" + object1);

        try {
            FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream("abc.txt");
            ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(fos);
            oos.writeObject(object1);

            FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream("abc.txt");
            ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(fis);
            SingletonImpl object2 = (SingletonImpl) ois.readObject();
            System.out.println("Object2" + object2);

        } catch (Exception e) {
            // TODO: handle exception
        }
        try {
            Constructor[] constructors = SingletonImpl.class.getDeclaredConstructors();
            for (Constructor constructor : constructors) {
                // Below code will not destroy the singleton pattern
                constructor.setAccessible(true);
                SingletonImpl Object3 = (SingletonImpl) constructor.newInstance();
                System.out.println("Object3: Break through Reflection:" + Object3);
                break;
            }
        } catch (Exception ew) {

        }

    }
}

**OUTPUT**
Object1:com.singleton.breakable.SingletonImpl@15db9742
Object2com.singleton.breakable.SingletonImpl@15db9742
Object3: Break through Reflection:com.singleton.breakable.SingletonImpl@33909752
  • Here its breaking with Reflection API by making constructor as visible, So please follow the below code provided by me , (Ashish Agrawal), Code is fully singleton – Ashish Agrawal Yodlee Jul 30 '17 at 5:25

Just to note, that as of Java 8 and according to my check- you cannot instantiate a Singleton via Reflections as long as it has a private constructor.

You'll get this exception:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalAccessException: Class com.s.Main can not access a member of class com.s.SingletonInstance with modifiers "private"
at sun.reflect.Reflection.ensureMemberAccess(Unknown Source)
at java.lang.Class.newInstance(Unknown Source)
at com.s.Main.main(Main.java:6)

Perfect Singleton Class that can avoid instance creation during serialization, clone and reflection.

import java.io.Serializable;

public class Singleton implements Cloneable, Serializable {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
    private static volatile Singleton instance;

    private Singleton() {
        if (instance != null) {
            throw new InstantiationError("Error creating class");
        }
    }

    public static Singleton getInstance() {
        if (instance == null) {
            synchronized (Singleton.class) {

                if (instance == null) {
                    return new Singleton();
                }
            }
        }
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    protected Object clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException {
        throw new CloneNotSupportedException();
    }

    Object readResolve() {
        return Singleton.getInstance();
    }

}

To overcome issue raised by reflection, enums are used because java ensures internally that enum value is instantiated only once. Since java Enums are globally accessible, they can be used for singletons. Its only drawback is that it is not flexible i.e it does not allow lazy initialization.

public enum Singleton {
 INSTANCE
}

public class ReflectionTest 
{

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Singleton instance1 = Singleton.INSTANCE;
        Singleton instance2 = Singleton.INSTANCE;
    System.out.println("instance1 hashcode- "
                                      + instance1.hashCode());
        System.out.println("instance2 hashcode- "
                                      + instance2.hashCode());
    }
}

JVM handles the creation and invocation of enum constructors internally. As enums don’t give their constructor definition to the program, it is not possible for us to access them by Reflection also.

Refer the post for more details.

Here Reflection not work     

    package com.singleton.nonbreakable;

        import java.io.FileInputStream;
        import java.io.FileOutputStream;
        import java.io.ObjectInputStream;
        import java.io.ObjectOutputStream;
        import java.lang.reflect.Constructor;

        class FullySingletonClass {

            public static void main(String[] args) {

                SingletonImpl object1 = SingletonImpl.getInstance();
                System.out.println("Object1:" + object1);

                try {
                    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream("abc.txt");
                    ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(fos);
                    oos.writeObject(object1);

                    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream("abc.txt");
                    ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(fis);
                    SingletonImpl object2 = (SingletonImpl) ois.readObject();
                    System.out.println("Object2" + object2);

                } catch (Exception e) {
                    // TODO: handle exception
                }
                try {
                    Constructor[] constructors = SingletonImpl.class.getDeclaredConstructors();
                    for (Constructor constructor : constructors) {
                        // Below code will not destroy the singleton pattern
                        constructor.setAccessible(true);
                        SingletonImpl Object3 = (SingletonImpl) constructor.newInstance();
                        System.out.println("Object3:" + Object3);
                        break;
                    }
                } catch (Exception ew) {

                }

            }
        }


    package com.singleton.nonbreakable;

    import java.io.Serializable;

    class SingletonImpl implements Cloneable, Serializable {

        public static SingletonImpl singleInstance = null;

        private static class SingletonHolder {
            public static SingletonImpl getInstance() {
                if (null == singleInstance) {
                    singleInstance = new SingletonImpl();
                }
                return singleInstance;
            }
        }

        private SingletonImpl() {

        }

        @Override
        protected Object clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException {
            return singleInstance;
        };

        public Object readResolve() {
            System.out.println("Executing readResolve again");
            return SingletonImpl.getInstance(); // FIXME
        }

        public static SingletonImpl getInstance() {

            return SingletonHolder.getInstance();
        }

    }

    Output : 
    Object1:com.singleton.nonbreakable.SingletonImpl@15db9742
    Executing readResolve again
    Object2com.singleton.nonbreakable.SingletonImpl@15db9742
  • this is pure Singleton, This code will not break in any case like- Cloning,Serialization, Reflection. – Ashish Agrawal Yodlee Jan 27 '17 at 15:28

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