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I have been trying to figure out when and where to use different patterns in Python. I came across this document: https://python-patterns.guide/gang-of-four/abstract-factory/

Now this made me wonder how can I do what he says in my code. Here is my implementation is an abstract factory. Not sure if its correct.

from abc import abstractmethod, ABC

from sqlalchemy.orm import Session

from managers.database_manager import DatabaseManager
from managers.log_manager import LogManager
from managers.sqlalchemy_manager import get_db
from models.bal.post import Post
from models.dal.models import Post as ORMPost


class PostsManager(ABC):
    def __init__(self):
        pass

    @abstractmethod
    def get_posts(self):
        pass

    @abstractmethod
    def get_post(self, post_id):
        pass

    @abstractmethod
    def create_post(self, post: Post):
        pass

    @abstractmethod
    def delete_post(self, post_id):
        pass

    @abstractmethod
    def update_post(self, post_id, post: Post):
        pass


class PostsManagerFactory:
    @staticmethod
    def get_posts_manager(use_orm=True) -> PostsManager:
        if use_orm:
            return PostsManagerWithORM()
        else:
            return PostsManagerWithoutORM()


class PostsManagerWithORM(PostsManager):

    def get_posts(self):
        db: Session = get_db()
        posts = db.query(ORMPost).all()
        return posts

    def get_post(self, post_id):
        pass

    def create_post(self, post: Post):
        pass

    def delete_post(self, post_id):
        pass

    def update_post(self, post_id, post: Post):
        pass


class PostsManagerWithoutORM(PostsManager):
    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__()
        self.db_manager = DatabaseManager()

    def get_posts(self):
        posts = self.db_manager.execute_query("select * from posts")
        return posts

    def get_post(self, post_id):
        post = self.db_manager.execute_query("SELECT * FROM posts WHERE id='%s'", (post_id,), single_record_flag=True)
        return post

    def create_post(self, post: Post):
        post = self.db_manager.execute_query("INSERT INTO posts (title, content) VALUES (%s, %s) RETURNING *",
                                             (post.title, post.content), single_record_flag=True)

        return post

    def delete_post(self, post_id):
        post = self.db_manager.execute_query("DELETE FROM posts WHERE id = %s RETURNING *", (post_id,),
                                             single_record_flag=True)
        return post

    def update_post(self, post_id, post: Post):
        post = self.db_manager.execute_query(
            "UPDATE posts SET title = %s, content = %s, published = %s WHERE id= %s RETURNING *",
            (post.title, post.content, post.published, post_id),
            single_record_flag=True)
        return post

Here is how I am calling these methods:

posts_manager = PostsManagerFactory.get_posts_manager()
posts = posts_manager.get_posts()

My first question, is it the right way to use abstract factory pattern? If, not please let me know, I will probably ask a new question. Anyway if it is, why does that document say about using callables is better than using abstract factory pattern, how do I do that in this case?

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  • 1
    As far as I understand, you are not using the abstract factory pattern here, it is just an abstract class / interface. A factory builds and returns an object. In your example, the methods of the class do not build anything, they interact with something, posting, retrieving, updating and deleting posts. Nov 14, 2021 at 4:22
  • You're right, sorry. Added the factory class now. Is it using the abstract factory pattern now?
    – defiant
    Nov 14, 2021 at 5:14
  • 1
    Yes, you are now using a factory pattern, but not an abstract factory pattern, as your PostsFactory class does not derive from an abstract class. Anyway, you could use a callable instead of the class by extracting the get_posts_factory() method and making it a function. Nov 14, 2021 at 5:31
  • 1
    This being said, the name of your method get_posts_factory() that may or may not become a function depending on what you choose is not right. This factory does not return a PostFactory but an instance of one of PostManager subclass. It should then be renamed as get_posts_manager() instead. If you decide to keep the class PostsFactory, you should then also rename it to PostsManagerFactory, but in my opinion, the use of a class is not necessary as it contains only a static method. Nov 14, 2021 at 5:33
  • Ok thanks, I have now made those naming changes. I understand now that this is not using abstract factory pattern. If you could re-write this code using abstract factory pattern, how would you do it? Also I dont understand where you said I could use a callable by extracting the method and making it a function. If you could do those both and write an answer, I will accept it as the answer. Thanks a lot.
    – defiant
    Nov 14, 2021 at 6:18

1 Answer 1

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Following you last comment.

I would not use abstract factory pattern for this use case. May I ask why you want to use it ?

When I suggest to remove the PostsManagerFactory class by extracting the get_posts_manager to a function, I mean replacing this code snippet

class PostsManagerFactory:
    @staticmethod
    def get_posts_manager(use_orm=True) -> PostsManager:
        if use_orm:
            return PostsManagerWithORM()
        else:
            return PostsManagerWithoutORM()

with this

def get_posts_manager(use_orm=True) -> PostsManager:
    if use_orm:
        return PostsManagerWithORM()
    else:
        return PostsManagerWithoutORM()

that you may want to shorten this way

def get_posts_manager(use_orm=True) -> PostsManager:
    return PostsManagerWithORM() if use_orm else PostsManagerWithoutORM()

Then, you could use it in your code simply by calling the function

posts_manager = get_posts_manager() # <----
posts = posts_manager.get_posts()
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  • This is not a real use case. I am just trying out different things and wanted to learn to use different patterns as well. I had some api code lying around which I wrote as part of another tutorial and I thought it would be fun to use some patterns and learn about it more.
    – defiant
    Nov 14, 2021 at 9:38

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