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I am looking for an easy way to count the number of the green pixels in the image below, where the original image is the same but the green pixels are black.

I tried it with numpy.diff(), but then I am counting some pixels twice. I thought about numpy.gradient() – but here I am not sure if it is the right tool.

I know there have to be many solutions to this problem, but I don't know how to google for it. I am looking for a solution in python.

Image with a T

To make it clearer, I have only one image (only black and white pixels). The image with the green pixel is just for illustration.

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  • So you have two images? And you want to count the pixels that are green in one but black in the other image?
    – Homer512
    Nov 14, 2021 at 12:10
  • 2
    If I understood correctly, you would like to have a function that takes a binary image as an input and returns a list of all edge pixels. I think the answer on this question is what you're looking for. Please note it is not that efficient but it definitely is simple. stackoverflow.com/questions/60095053/…
    – waykiki
    Nov 14, 2021 at 12:16
  • I only want to count the pixels, this answer is to inefficient for me
    – nuemlouno
    Nov 14, 2021 at 12:28
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    Your image is incoherent : the tops of the T have the diagonals cells counted, while the inner short line of 3 do not have the diagonal cells included. Please refine your definition of neighbor pixels and edit the image accordingly.
    – sybog64
    Nov 14, 2021 at 12:37
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    @KarlKnechtel yes
    – nuemlouno
    Nov 14, 2021 at 13:23

1 Answer 1

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You can use the edge detection kernel for this problem.

import numpy as np
from scipy.ndimage import convolve

a = np.array([[0, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 1, 1, 1],
              [0, 1, 1, 1]])

kernel = np.array([[-1, -1, -1],
                   [-1,  8, -1],
                   [-1, -1, -1]])

Then, we will convolve the original array with the kernel. Notice that the edges are all negatives.

>>> convolve(a, kernel)
[[-1 -2 -3 -3]
 [-2  5  3  3]
 [-3  3  0  0]]

We will count the number of negative values and get the result.

>>> np.where(convolve(a, kernel) < 0, 1, 0)
[[1 1 1 1]
 [1 0 0 0]
 [1 0 0 0]]

>>> np.sum(np.where(convolve(a, kernel) < 0, 1, 0))
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Edges-only kernel

There are a lot of things you can do with the kernel. For example, you can modify the kernel if you don't want to include diagonal neighbors.

kernel = np.array([[ 0, -1,  0],
                   [-1,  4, -1],
                   [ 0, -1,  0]])

This gives the following output.

>>> np.where(convolve(a, kernel) < 0, 1, 0)
[[0 1 1 1]
 [1 0 0 0]
 [1 0 0 0]]

>>> np.sum(np.where(convolve(a, kernel) < 0, 1, 0))
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  • would switching to excluded diagonal neighbors be as simple as setting them to 0 in the kernel ?
    – sybog64
    Nov 14, 2021 at 13:02
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    @sybog64 Yes, you can use the np.array([[ 0, -1, 0], [-1, 4, -1], [0, -1, 0]]) kernel if you don't want to include diagonal neighbors.
    – Troll
    Nov 14, 2021 at 13:04
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    This answer is perfect!
    – nuemlouno
    Nov 14, 2021 at 13:28

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