8

I have an data named faces which definition is like this:

struct ivec3 {
    unsigned int v0;
    unsigned int v1;
    unsigned int v2;
};

std::vector<ivec3> faces;

I got the faces with 100 elements(faces.size()=100).
Now I want to get all v0 of faces. If I use the Python, I can do it like this

all_v0 = faces[:, 0]

So, how can I use the slicing operation in C++ like above code of Python?
Thanks very much!

0

3 Answers 3

7

You can do this with the help of std::transform:

std::vector<int> all_v0;
all_v0.reserve(faces.size());
std::transform(faces.begin(), faces.end(), 
               std::back_inserter(all_v0), 
               [] (const ivec3& i) { return i.v0; });
0
7

There is no "slicing operation" for vectors in C++.

But this can be done with a simple loop. Or, without writing the loop yourself by using a standard algorithm such as std::transform.

Consider whether you actually need a new container that has the "slices", or whether you would perhaps be content with having a range that can access those elements. This is analogous to using generator objects instead of creating the list in Python. Example:

auto get_v0 = [](const auto& v) -> auto {
    return v.v0;
};
auto v0_range = std::ranges::transform_view(
    faces,
    get_v0
);
// access the objects:
for (auto v0 : v0_range) {
    // use v0
}
// or if you do need a container:
std::vector v0s(begin(v0_range), end(v0_range));

Instead of the function, you can also use a member pointer as demonstrated in 康桓瑋's answer

4
  • @Jarod42 It's an unsigned int. It's better to copy.
    – eerorika
    Nov 15, 2021 at 9:12
  • My point/question is: should modifying v0_range be replicated into faces, or not? Should we have a copy or a view?
    – Jarod42
    Nov 15, 2021 at 9:18
  • @Jarod42 Do you mean if the elements of the range are modified? They cannot be modified since they're prvalues. You even have to go out of your way to write code that looks like you're modifying them, since lvalue references to non-const cannot be bound to prvalues. If you want to modify the elements of faces, then use references.
    – eerorika
    Nov 15, 2021 at 9:21
  • Not sure what OP wants (python won't copy content (but their int are immutable), so example might be too minimal :) ). Both behavior might be correct. So copy or reference depending of expected behavior.
    – Jarod42
    Nov 15, 2021 at 9:47
5

You can pass in the corresponding member object pointer to C++20 views::transform to do this.

#include <ranges>
#include <vector>

struct ivec3 {
    unsigned int v0;
    unsigned int v1;
    unsigned int v2;
};

int main() {
  std::vector<ivec3> faces;
  auto v0s = faces | std::views::transform(&ivec3::v0);
  auto v1s = faces | std::views::transform(&ivec3::v1);
  auto v2s = faces | std::views::transform(&ivec3::v2);
}
4
  • Nice. I didn't know that member pointers would also work with transform view.
    – eerorika
    Nov 15, 2021 at 6:58
  • Great, more elegent way! But it is cannot used with the version older than C++20?
    – jack tsang
    Nov 15, 2021 at 6:59
  • @jacktsang The standard ranges library was introduced in C++20. You can instead use the ranges-v3 library on which the standard ranges are based on. There are other alternatives too, like Boost but with different API.
    – eerorika
    Nov 15, 2021 at 8:21
  • 1
    Notice than v0s, v1s, v2s are not copies, so modifying them would be reflected into faces (and in similar way, changes in faces would be reflected in those views).
    – Jarod42
    Nov 15, 2021 at 9:50

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