30

DOMNodeInserted is known to make dynamic pages slow, MDN even recommends not using it altogether, but doesn't provide any alternatives.

I'm not interested in the element inserted, I just need to know when some script modifies the DOM. Is there a better alternative to mutation event listeners (maybe getElementsByTagName inside an nsiTimer)?

8
  • You need that feature for the entire DOM? And at all times? Aug 9 '11 at 14:33
  • If you have a particular script and you know how it works - you can "booby-trap" the DOM methods/properties it uses. Otherwise you are out of luck, monitoring all DOM modifications is exactly what makes mutation events slow. Aug 9 '11 at 14:36
  • Šime Vidas, yes I do, some scripts insert <object> tags when the user interacts with the page.
    – Fábio
    Aug 9 '11 at 16:51
  • @Fabio Are those scripts third-party or your scripts? Aug 9 '11 at 18:27
  • Third-party. I have an extension that keeps track of content in webpages.
    – Fábio
    Aug 9 '11 at 18:55
44

If you are creating a web app that targets recent mobile phones and newer versions of browsers (Firefox 5+, Chrome 4+, Safari 4+, iOS Safari 3+, Android 2.1+), you can use the following code to create an awesome event for the insertion of dom nodes, and it even runs on the nodes initially part of the page's static mark-up!

Here's the link to the full post with and example: http://www.backalleycoder.com/2012/04/25/i-want-a-damnodeinserted/

Note on Mutation Observers: while the newer Mutation Observers features in recent browsers are great for monitoring simple insertions and changes to the DOM, do understand that this method can be used to do far more as it allows you to monitor for any CSS rule match you can thing of. This is super powerful for many use-cases, so I wrapped this up in a library here: https://github.com/csuwildcat/SelectorListener

You'll need to add the appropriate prefixes to the CSS and animationstart event name if you want to target various browsers. You can read more about that in the post linked to above.

The basic node insertion case

CSS:

@keyframes nodeInserted {  
    from {  
        outline-color: #fff; 
    }
    to {  
        outline-color: #000;
    }  
}

div.some-control {
    animation-duration: 0.01s;
    animation-name: nodeInserted;
}

JavaScript:

document.addEventListener('animationstart', function(event){
    if (event.animationName == 'nodeInserted'){
        // Do something here
    }
}, true);

Listening for more complex selector matches:

This enables things that are almost impossible to do with Mutation Observers

CSS:

@keyframes adjacentFocusSequence {  
    from {  
        outline-color: #fff; 
    }
    to {  
        outline-color: #000;
    }  
}

.one + .two + .three:focus {
    animation-duration: 0.01s;
    animation-name: adjacentFocusSequence;
}

JavaScript:

document.addEventListener('animationstart', function(event){
    if (event.animationName == 'adjacentFocusSequence'){
        // Do something here when '.one + .two + .three' are 
        // adjacent siblings AND node '.three' is focused
    }
}, true);
16
  • 5
    This is by far the most excellent alternative to DOMNodeInserted I've ever seen. In fact I have been using it for months and it works well.
    – Rufus
    Aug 16 '12 at 13:55
  • The technique can be applied to IE10+ but clip: rect doesn't work in IE10 (not sure about 11). I used outline in my insertionQuery lib github.com/naugtur/insertionQuery
    – naugtur
    Feb 3 '14 at 10:07
  • @naugtur outline is a good idea, especially if you can do the dummy animation on just the color. I'll probably update this thread and my blog post with that.
    – csuwldcat
    Mar 4 '14 at 18:06
  • @naugtur it's now updated on Github, and I've tweaked this answer to match - thanks for the heads-up!
    – csuwldcat
    Mar 4 '14 at 18:23
  • 2
    Sorry to say that, but now you're just confusing people. The code in your post is far from being cross-browser (animation events have prefixes, animation itself needs other prefixes) and I never said you can animate just the color. It's not what I tested.
    – naugtur
    Mar 5 '14 at 19:23
11

One new alternative that @naugtur briefly mentioned is MutationObserver. It's designed as a replacement for the deprecated mutation events, if the browser(s) you're developing for supports it (like if you're developing a browser extension).

4
  • 1
    However, Mutation Observers do not provide notification of CSS selector-based mutations though, which is a super helpful feature. I have a small module that wraps the keyframe solution above to make CSS selector listeniong even easier: github.com/csuwildcat/SelectorListener
    – csuwldcat
    Oct 10 '14 at 20:42
  • Think @csuwldcat's advice is outdated – Mutation Observers can detect any change you might infer from a CSS selector (using attributes), and more (node removal, text node changes).
    – Barney
    Dec 15 '14 at 12:21
  • @Barney a couple of things: 1) you can listen for selector matches with this method, which is impossible with Mutation Observers - for more on what this provides see: github.com/csuwildcat/SelectorListener, and 2) Mutation Observers aren't supported in older browsers like IE9, Safari 5, 6, etc.
    – csuwldcat
    Dec 16 '14 at 16:44
  • @Barney I've updated my answer with another use-case that makes it clear what this method can do easily that Mutation Observers cannot.
    – csuwldcat
    Dec 16 '14 at 16:59
0

The same technique as csuwldcat described has been made into an easy to use jQuery plugin (if that's your thing): https://github.com/liamdanger/jQuery.DOMNodeAppear

-1

This is posted here because this question is where I landed looking for help with DOMNodeInserted failing with IE9, but please note this solution is specifically for a situation where jQuery is being used within an ASP.NET context that uses an End Request function. Your mileage may vary, etc....

Basically, we are going to throw away the DOMNodeInserted altogether and use End Request to load our event handler:

OLD:

$(document).ready(function() {

$(document).bind('DOMNodeInserted', function(event){
My jQuery event handler...

 }); 
});

===================================

NEW:

function Ajax_EndRequest {
  function2();
}

function2 (a,b){
  My jQuery event handler...
}

$(document).ready(function(){
  add_endRequest(Ajax_EndRequest); //this is what actually invokes the function upon request end.

 My jQuery event handler...//REMOVED -- don't need this now
});
-22

If all you want to do is trigger an event when the DOM changes, do something like this:

var nodes=document.getElementsByTagName('*')||document.all;

function domchange(){
    alert('Hello');
}

window.setInterval(function(){
    var newnodes=document.getElementsByTagName('*')||document.all;
    if(newnodes!=nodes){
        nodes=newnodes;
        domchange();
    }
},1);
5
  • 26
    This is terrible code that will massacre any page it is inserted into.
    – user1385191
    Aug 17 '11 at 0:41
  • 1
    Not true, but great comment. You can change that last little "1" to 500 if you want. That would update every half second instead of (up to) 1000 times per second.
    – Anonymous
    Aug 17 '11 at 0:42
  • 13
    Go to a big site like msnbc.com and note how many big the getElementsByTagName("*") collection is. I got "2605" elements. You can't seriously think this is a good idea.
    – user1385191
    Aug 17 '11 at 0:57
  • Hahaha, I just had to log in to applaud you guys ... these comments are pure gold, indeed.
    – aefxx
    Sep 23 '16 at 15:04
  • Yeah the * operator in CSS alone is expensive. Please don't add alert(...) too. And the 1ms poll omg!
    – M_Willett
    Sep 17 '20 at 8:20

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