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How do I convert an integer into a binary string in Python?

37   →   '100101'
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  • For the opposite take, for a pure string processing algorithm, see this. Commented Mar 15, 2020 at 17:05

36 Answers 36

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I feel Martijn Pieter's comment deserves to be highlighted as an answer:

binary_string = format(value, '0{}b'.format(width))

To me is is both clear and versatile.

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If you are willing to give up "pure" Python but gain a lot of firepower, there is Sage - example here:

sage: a = 15
sage: a.binary()
'1111'

You'll note that it returns as a string, so to use it as a number you'd want to do something like

sage: eval('0b'+b)
15
0

Here's a simple binary to decimal converter that continuously loops

t = 1
while t > 0:
    binaryNumber = input("Enter a binary No.")
    convertedNumber = int(binaryNumber, 2)

    print(convertedNumber)

print("")
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  • This is the reverse order of what the OP wants. They are looking for int to binary. You provide binary to int.
    – Cecilia
    Commented Mar 10, 2017 at 16:55
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This is my answer it works well..!

def binary(value) :
    binary_value = ''
    while value !=1  :
        binary_value += str(value%2)
        value = value//2
    return '1'+binary_value[::-1]
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  • What if you pass the value 0? E.g. binary(0) will you get what you expect? Commented Jan 9, 2020 at 11:25
-1

Here is a (debugged) program that uses divmod to construct a binary list:

Program

while True:
    indecimal_str = input('Enter positive(decimal) integer: ')
    if indecimal_str == '':
        raise SystemExit
    indecimal_save = int(indecimal_str)
    if indecimal_save < 1:
        print('Rejecting input, try again')
        print()
        continue
    indecimal = int(indecimal_str)
    exbin = []
    print(indecimal, '<->', exbin)
    while True:
        if indecimal == 0:
            print('Conversion:', indecimal_save, '=', "".join(exbin))
            print()
            break
        indecimal, r = divmod(indecimal, 2)
        if r == 0:
            exbin.insert(0, '0')
        else:
            exbin.insert(0, '1')
        print(indecimal, '<->', exbin)

Output

Enter positive(decimal) integer: 8
8 <-> []
4 <-> ['0']
2 <-> ['0', '0']
1 <-> ['0', '0', '0']
0 <-> ['1', '0', '0', '0']
Conversion: 8 = 1000

Enter positive(decimal) integer: 63
63 <-> []
31 <-> ['1']
15 <-> ['1', '1']
7 <-> ['1', '1', '1']
3 <-> ['1', '1', '1', '1']
1 <-> ['1', '1', '1', '1', '1']
0 <-> ['1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '1']
Conversion: 63 = 111111

Enter positive(decimal) integer: 409
409 <-> []
204 <-> ['1']
102 <-> ['0', '1']
51 <-> ['0', '0', '1']
25 <-> ['1', '0', '0', '1']
12 <-> ['1', '1', '0', '0', '1']
6 <-> ['0', '1', '1', '0', '0', '1']
3 <-> ['0', '0', '1', '1', '0', '0', '1']
1 <-> ['1', '0', '0', '1', '1', '0', '0', '1']
0 <-> ['1', '1', '0', '0', '1', '1', '0', '0', '1']
Conversion: 409 = 110011001
-1

Along a similar line to Yusuf Yazici's answer

def intToBin(n):
    if(n < 0):
        print "Sorry, invalid input."
    elif(n == 0):
        print n
    else:
        result = ""
        while(n != 0):
            result += str(n%2)
            n /= 2
        print result[::-1]

I adjusted it so that the only variable being mutated is result (and n of course).

If you need to use this function elsewhere (i.e., have the result used by another module), consider the following adjustment:

def intToBin(n):
    if(n < 0):
        return -1
    elif(n == 0):
        return str(n)
    else:
        result = ""
        while(n != 0):
            result += str(n%2)
            n //= 2            #added integer division
        return result[::-1]

So -1 will be your sentinel value indicating the conversion failed. (This is assuming you are converting ONLY positive numbers, whether they be integers or longs).

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  • 2
    Raising meaningful errors is preferable to printing output or returning sentinel values.
    – Daniel Lee
    Commented May 27, 2014 at 6:27
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