331

Right now I decorate a method like this to allow "members" to access my controller action

[Authorize(Roles="members")]

How do I allow more than one role? For example the following does not work but it shows what I am trying to do (allow "members" and "admin" access):

[Authorize(Roles="members", "admin")] 
1
  • 4
    Please change the accepted answer to this question. The person with the currently accepted answer edited it indicating that he was wrong.
    – Eric J.
    Commented Mar 28, 2014 at 20:14

14 Answers 14

683

Another option is to use a single authorize filter as you posted but remove the inner quotations.

[Authorize(Roles="members,admin")]
11
  • 5
    Works in MVC 5 too. +1
    – gkonuralp
    Commented Jul 24, 2015 at 6:25
  • 5
    Works in ASP.NET Core 1.0 (MVC 6) and Microsoft.AspNet.Identity v3.*
    – Søren
    Commented Jun 21, 2016 at 8:19
  • 4
    This is okay if you only have one controller that you need to authorize. If you have more than one, you're duplicating those string constants (yuck). I much prefer the static class that has the role names. My pet hate is duplicate strings... so so bad.
    – robnick
    Commented Aug 17, 2018 at 0:55
  • 2
    Why? It took me ages to work this out. It may be helpful for someone else experiencing the same problem.
    – Craig
    Commented Jun 21, 2019 at 3:30
  • 4
    extra note: as per learn.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/security/authorization/… - this is OR and not AND
    – gawkface
    Commented Mar 1, 2022 at 1:14
163

If you want use custom roles, you can do this:

CustomRoles class:

public static class CustomRoles
{
    public const string Administrator = "Administrador";
    public const string User = "Usuario";
}

Usage

[Authorize(Roles = CustomRoles.Administrator +","+ CustomRoles.User)]

If you have few roles, maybe you can combine them (for clarity) like this:

public static class CustomRoles
{
     public const string Administrator = "Administrador";
     public const string User = "Usuario";
     public const string AdministratorOrUser = Administrator + "," + User;  
}

Usage

[Authorize(Roles = CustomRoles.AdministratorOrUser)]
5
  • 10
    This would be a good answer, if you explained to people who didn't know what's behind CustomRoles. Commented Jun 15, 2012 at 1:39
  • 1
    @JamesSkemp ok, i've extended my answer. It is very simple. CustumRoles is a class that i created that contains some constants, that corresponds with my application roles. I did that for a few reasons: 1) It allow the use of intellisense to avoid spelling mistakes 2)To simplify maintenance. If a role change, i have to update only one place within my application. Commented Jun 15, 2012 at 11:32
  • @Pabloker Alternatively you can create an enum with an Flags attribute, e.g. Convert.ToString(CustomRoles.Administrator | CustomRoles.User); - annoying part is that this requires an explicit conversion
    – cstruter
    Commented Sep 14, 2012 at 9:41
  • If you have 39 roles ?
    – Kiquenet
    Commented Nov 14, 2018 at 11:12
  • I think your problem goes through the modeling of permits beyond what can be done with .net Commented Nov 14, 2018 at 13:41
107

One possible simplification would be to subclass AuthorizeAttribute:

public class RolesAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public RolesAttribute(params string[] roles)
    {
        Roles = String.Join(",", roles);
    }
}

Usage:

[Roles("members", "admin")]

Semantically it is the same as Jim Schmehil's answer.

4
  • 4
    This does not worked for me, the logged in user was able to bypass the attribute even if the user did not have any of the roles.
    – Urielzen
    Commented Mar 7, 2016 at 7:20
  • 13
    This answer is better for when you are using constants as your values: ie [Roles(Constants.Admin,Constants.Owner)]
    – dalcam
    Commented Jun 23, 2016 at 17:07
  • 5
    this is the best answer
    – IgorShch
    Commented Aug 16, 2018 at 12:22
  • 4
    I know this is an old post, but let me add this. In order for this code snippet to work, you have to use System.Web.Mvc.AuthorizeAttribute for System.Web.Mvc.Controllers and System.Web.Http.AuthorizeAttribute for System.Web.Http.ApiController (RESTful calls).
    – Efthymios
    Commented Oct 8, 2020 at 10:32
19

For MVC4, using a Enum (UserRoles) with my roles, I use a custom AuthorizeAttribute.

On my controlled action, I do:

[CustomAuthorize(UserRoles.Admin, UserRoles.User)]
public ActionResult ChangePassword()
{
    return View();
}

And I use a custom AuthorizeAttribute like that:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method | AttributeTargets.Class, Inherited = true, AllowMultiple = true)]
public class CustomAuthorize : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    private string[] UserProfilesRequired { get; set; }

    public CustomAuthorize(params object[] userProfilesRequired)
    {
        if (userProfilesRequired.Any(p => p.GetType().BaseType != typeof(Enum)))
            throw new ArgumentException("userProfilesRequired");

        this.UserProfilesRequired = userProfilesRequired.Select(p => Enum.GetName(p.GetType(), p)).ToArray();
    }

    public override void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext context)
    {
        bool authorized = false;

        foreach (var role in this.UserProfilesRequired)
            if (HttpContext.Current.User.IsInRole(role))
            {
                authorized = true;
                break;
            }

        if (!authorized)
        {
            var url = new UrlHelper(context.RequestContext);
            var logonUrl = url.Action("Http", "Error", new { Id = 401, Area = "" });
            context.Result = new RedirectResult(logonUrl);

            return;
        }
    }
}

This is part of modifed FNHMVC by Fabricio Martínez Tamayo https://github.com/fabriciomrtnz/FNHMVC/

6
  • 1
    Your OnAuthorization method will require the user to have all the enumerated roles; was that intentional, or are you missing a break in that loop?
    – Tieson T.
    Commented Jan 5, 2015 at 5:18
  • @Tieson: I inspected that pretty closely, it definitely seems like a break would be required in that loop.
    – OcelotXL
    Commented Jan 21, 2015 at 2:26
  • @TiesonT. and @ madrush, I appreciate your fix, it really could have a break inside the loop. I'll change the code above. Commented Jan 26, 2015 at 13:19
  • The enum UserRoles is nice. Do you declare it manually or is it autogenerated based on the contents of the DB? Commented Jan 3, 2016 at 12:12
  • @KonradViltersten It's manually but I guess with Reflection and Dynamic class autogenerated can be done Commented Jan 3, 2016 at 21:58
13

You can use Authorization Policy in Startup.cs

    services.AddAuthorization(options =>
    {
        options.AddPolicy("admin", policy => policy.RequireRole("SuperAdmin","Admin"));
        options.AddPolicy("teacher", policy => policy.RequireRole("SuperAdmin", "Admin", "Teacher"));
    });

And in Controller Files:

 [Authorize(Policy = "teacher")]
 [HttpGet("stats/{id}")]
 public async Task<IActionResult> getStudentStats(int id)
 { ... }

"teacher" policy accept 3 roles.

2
  • 4
    Is it AND or OR?
    – variable
    Commented Jul 13, 2022 at 8:30
  • This was my preference. Also, in the new versions that do not have startup.cs you do the same thing now in program.cs. If you need different combinations you'll have to create a policy for each one, but then you don't have to put the Domain groups in the controller. you can put them in the AppSettings.json file.
    – Tim Melton
    Commented Mar 13 at 21:36
4

Another clear solution, you can use constants to keep convention and add multiple [Authorize] attributes. Check this out:

public static class RolesConvention
{
    public const string Administrator = "Administrator";
    public const string Guest = "Guest";
}

Then in the controller:

[Authorize(Roles = RolesConvention.Administrator )]
[Authorize(Roles = RolesConvention.Guest)]
[Produces("application/json")]
[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class MyController : Controller
1
  • 26
    Multiple Authorize attributes employ AND semantics and require ALL conditions to be met (i.e. user has to be in both the Administrator and Guest roles).
    – trousyt
    Commented Mar 17, 2017 at 20:44
4

Using AspNetCore 2.x, you have to go a little different way:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method | AttributeTargets.Class, Inherited = true, AllowMultiple = true)]
public class AuthorizeRoleAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public AuthorizeRoleAttribute(params YourEnum[] roles)
    {
        Policy = string.Join(",", roles.Select(r => r.GetDescription()));
    }
}

just use it like this:

[Authorize(YourEnum.Role1, YourEnum.Role2)]
2
  • Policy = or Roles = ?
    – SerjG
    Commented Nov 25, 2020 at 19:43
  • Roles = string.Join(",", roles.Select(r => r.ToString()));
    – Caner
    Commented Dec 20, 2021 at 8:03
4

I mixed answers and proposed this method.

Firstly, We create an enum for role accesses.

public enum ERoleAccess
{
     [Description("Admin User")]
     Admin = 1,

     [Description("General User")]
     User = 2,

     [Description("Editor User")]
     Editor = 3,
}

Secondly, we need an attribute filter for customer MVC authorize.

public class RolesAttribute:AuthorizeAttribute
{
   public RolesAttribute(params ERoleAccess[] roles)
   {
      Roles = string.Join(",", roles);
   }
}

Finally, we can use "RolesAttribute" on the controllers or actions.


[Roles(ERoleAccess.Admin, ERoleAccess.Editor, ERoleAccess.User)]

In this approach, we use numbers of alternative string values. (1= Admin, 2=User,...)

It's good for decreasing token size and comparing performance.

1
  • As it’s currently written, your answer is unclear. Please edit to add additional details that will help others understand how this addresses the question asked. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Commented Oct 6, 2022 at 0:31
3

Better code with adding a subclass AuthorizeRole.cs

    [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method | AttributeTargets.Class, Inherited = true, AllowMultiple = true)]
    class AuthorizeRoleAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
    {
        public AuthorizeRoleAttribute(params Rolenames[] roles)
        {
            this.Roles = string.Join(",", roles.Select(r => Enum.GetName(r.GetType(), r)));
        }
        protected override void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(System.Web.Mvc.AuthorizationContext filterContext)
        {
            if (filterContext.HttpContext.Request.IsAuthenticated)
            {
                filterContext.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(
                new RouteValueDictionary {
                  { "action", "Unauthorized" },
                  { "controller", "Home" },
                  { "area", "" }
                  }
              );
                //base.HandleUnauthorizedRequest(filterContext);
            }
            else
            {
                filterContext.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(
                new RouteValueDictionary {
                  { "action", "Login" },
                  { "controller", "Account" },
                  { "area", "" },
                  { "returnUrl", HttpContext.Current.Request.Url }
                  }
              );
            }
        }
    }

How to use this

[AuthorizeRole(Rolenames.Admin,Rolenames.Member)]

public ActionResult Index()
{
return View();
}
3

If you find yourself applying those 2 roles often you can wrap them in their own Authorize. This is really an extension of the accepted answer.

using System.Web.Mvc;

public class AuthorizeAdminOrMember : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public AuthorizeAdminOrMember()
    {
        Roles = "members, admin";
    }
}

And then apply your new authorize to the Action. I think this looks cleaner and reads easily.

public class MyController : Controller
{
    [AuthorizeAdminOrMember]
    public ActionResult MyAction()
    {
        return null;
    }
}
3

For "Or" you need comma between roles

[Authorize(Roles="members,admin")]

both members and admins can access

But for "and" you need

[Authorize(Roles="manager")]
[Authorize(Roles="sales")]

managers who are in sales can access.

0
[Authorize(Roles="admin")]
[Authorize(Roles="members")]

will work when the AND is needed (as asked by question) whereas this answer shows the OR version. See more at https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/security/authorization/roles?view=aspnetcore-6.0#adding-role-checks

0

If you have anything beyond a basic Role based security you will have custom authorization attributes. It’s harder to have multiple “OR”ing authorize filter attributes.

I wanted:

"somethingIDontHave.oops" | "SRE.View" | "SRE.List" | "SRE-BADBADBAD.List" | "SRE.Edit"

Where those are custom filters and I wanted them in their own Attributes.

At our company we have Resources and Actions that you can perform as well as Phylums that you can be. It’s a little more complicated than just Roles.

I wanted something like this:

[AuthorizeByResourceAction("somethingIDontHave", "oops")]
[AuthorizeByResourceAction("SRE", "View")]
[AuthorizeByResourceAction("SRE-BADBADBAD", "List")]
[AuthorizeByResourceAction("SRE", "Edit")]
public class DashboardModel : PageModel
{}

And have each AuthorizeByResourceAction OR each other.

My solution is to have OnAuthorizationAsync get all the attributes on the Target and then run over all of them until I get a ‘Yes’. You will get check amplification with this solution, so you should be caching your results. You also have to pass in the type.

How to specify which attributes can be OR’ed.

public interface IOrAbleAuthorization
{
    Task<bool> IsAuthorizedAsync(HttpContext httpContextAccessor);
}

For the actual class that does the Authorization Filtering

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class, AllowMultiple = true)]
public class AuthorizeByResourceActionAttribute : Attribute, IAsyncAuthorizationFilter, IOrAbleAuthorization
{
    protected readonly string _resource;
    protected readonly string _action;
    protected readonly Type _controller;

    public AuthorizeByResourceActionAttribute(Type Controller, string resource, string action = null) 
    { 
        _resource = resource;
        _action = action;
        _controller = Controller;
    }
}

The code that does the actual custom authorization is part of the Interface's IsAuthorizedAsync instead of OnAuthorizationAsync. OnAuthorizationAsync is responsible for calling all the other IOrAbleAuthorization classes.

public async Task<bool> IsAuthorizedAsync(HttpContext httpContextAccessor)
{
    // Custom Auth Code here
    string ActorJWT = httpContextAccessor.GetJWTFromCookie(false);

    bool hasAuth = await PM.Instance.HasPermission(ActorJWT, _resource, _action);
    if ( !hasAuth)
    {
        L.Warn($"User does not have permission to {_resource}.{_action}");
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

That is a simple true/false for IsAuthorized.

OnAuthorizationAsync will iterate over all of the attached attributes looking for any "True/Yes".

public async Task OnAuthorizationAsync(AuthorizationFilterContext context)
{
    object[] attributes = _controller.GetCustomAttributes(false);

    IOrAbleAuthorization[] filteredAttributes = attributes
        .Where(attribute => attribute.GetType().GetInterfaces().Contains(typeof(IOrAbleAuthorization)))
        .Cast<IOrAbleAuthorization>()
        .ToArray();

    bool isAuthorized = false;
    foreach(IOrAbleAuthorization filteredAttribute in filteredAttributes)
    {
        isAuthorized = await filteredAttribute.IsAuthorizedAsync(context.HttpContext);
        if ( isAuthorized )
            break;
    }

    if ( !isAuthorized) // All of them were false
    {
        context.Result = new ForbidResult();
    }
}

I could not find a way to get the Target type in my attribute without passing it in directly. So the final call will look like this:

[AuthorizeByResourceAction(typeof(DashboardModel), "somethingIDontHave", "oops")]
[AuthorizeByResourceAction(typeof(DashboardModel), "SRE", "View")]
[AuthorizeByResourceAction(typeof(DashboardModel), "SRE", "List")]
[AuthorizeByResourceAction(typeof(DashboardModel), "SRE.History", "List")]
[AuthorizeByResourceAction(typeof(DashboardModel), "SRE", "Edit")]
public class DashboardModel : PageModel
{ }

Problems:

  1. Call amplification
  2. Passing in the Type from the Model/Controller

Call Amplification - You can see 5 calls for somethingIDontHave.oops

You can see the call amplification here with 5 calls for the Auth check for "somethingIDontHave", but zero for "SRE-BADBADBAD". This is because "somethingIDontHave" is first, and the identity doesn't have that Resource. But the identity does have the "SRE.View" ResourceAction so it doesn't need to proceed to the following Authorization filter checks.

I would put in caching here to alleviate the multiple same checks.

I also don't like the passing in of the type. That's error-prone when copy/pasta the AuthorizeByResourceAction attribute onto the next controller/page.

-11
Intent promptInstall = new Intent(android.content.Intent.ACTION_VIEW);
promptInstall.setFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK);
promptInstall.setDataAndType(Uri.parse("http://10.0.2.2:8081/MyAPPStore/apk/Teflouki.apk"), "application/vnd.android.package-archive" );

startActivity(promptInstall);
1
  • 1
    Answers including code should have at least a minumum description explaining how the code works and why it answers to the question. Furthermode the code section formatting needs to be improved. Commented Jan 3, 2020 at 15:15

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