174

Is there anyway to open and work on .net framework 4.5 project in visual studio 2022.

May be problem is not with VS2022 but as .net framework 4.5 developer pack is not available any more .. my project can not be changed target version .. Is there any workaround?

enter image description here enter image description here

2
  • 5
    Upgrade. .NET Framework 4.5 went out of support years ago. The earliest supported version is 4.5.2 but even that goes out of support in a few months. The lowest supported version will be 4.6.2 Nov 18, 2021 at 15:11
  • 2
    See: thomaslevesque.com/2021/11/12/… Nov 20, 2021 at 16:56

10 Answers 10

384
  • Download Microsoft.NETFramework.ReferenceAssemblies.net45 from nuget.org
  • Open the package as zip (or rename the package file and change its extension from .nupkg to .zip then open it)
  • copy the files from build\.NETFramework\v4.5\ to C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework\.NETFramework\v4.5
  • Close Visual Studio and then reopen it

For more details: Building a project that target .NET Framework 4.5 in Visual Studio 2022

13
  • 11
    This also works when targeting .Net 4.0, just download the .net40 nuget package, and copy files to \.NETFramework\v4.0 folder. Restart VS then open the project and it works just fine.
    – pink li
    Dec 30, 2021 at 13:05
  • 44
    Note: After downloading you've to rename the file name from .nupkg to .zip than the rest of the process is as mentioned in this answer. Maybe it is known to the maximum of you but It could save hours for someone like me. That's why putting the comment here.
    – Raju Ahmed
    Feb 20, 2022 at 6:10
  • 18
    Remember to close and re-open Visual Studio after this as the change doesn't automatically take effect. Apr 12, 2022 at 12:59
  • 7
    Even if you have a v4.5 folder already, move those files to a new folder _BK and paste the files into the v4.5 folder. Works perfect. thank you!
    – Dennis
    Apr 26, 2022 at 19:43
  • 3
    Doesn't seem to work. The files exist but the options for other frameworks simply don't show up in the "Target framework" dropdown at all.
    – Nyerguds
    Jan 8, 2023 at 14:12
20

While all of the proposed, and even the accepted, solutions will work, none of them are the preferred approach.

The only thing you need to do is add a reference to the NuGet package as follows:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <OutputType>Exe</OutputType>
    <TargetFramework>net40</TargetFramework>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <ItemGroup>
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.NETFramework.ReferenceAssemblies.net40" Version="1.0.2">
      <PrivateAssets>all</PrivateAssets>
      <IncludeAssets>runtime; build; native; contentfiles; analyzers; buildtransitive</IncludeAssets>
    </PackageReference>
  </ItemGroup>
</Project>

Figure 1: C# project targeting .NET Framework 4.0 via reference assemblies

You can make this change directly in the *.csproj or via the Package Manager UI in Visual Studio. The MSBuild extensions in the package will take care of the rest of the magic. There are no scripts to write, files to copy, or permissions to grant. This will work without elevation, which would be required to write under %PROGRAMFILES%.

Setting PrivateAssets="All" will make the package reference design-time only. It will not be picked up or included as a transitive dependency if your target also builds a NuGet package.

.NET 4.0 console in VS2022

Figure 2: Project targeting .NET Framework 4.0 in the Visual Studio 2022 Solution Explorer

Roslyn Issue 56161: Remove .NET 4.5 Targeting Pack Requirement further confirms that this how you use reference assemblies when a targeting pack is not installed. This approach is useful any time you don't want to install a targeting pack or it's otherwise unavailable - say on a build server without Visual Studio.

The Proof

.NET Targeting Packs

Figure 3: Older .NET targeting packs not installed or available

I ran into the same issue after uninstalling Visual Studio 2019. The build worked as expected from Visual Studio and the CLI after adding this package reference.

Example

  1. Download the files from the .NET 4.0 Console using VS2022 Gist to any folder
  2. Open a developer prompt and navigate to the target folder
  3. Execute dotnet restore
  4. Open the project in Visual Studio 2022
  5. Build and run the project

Additional Information

  • Building from the command-line with dotnet or msbuild should be error and warning free
  • You do not have to have the target .NET Framework version installed to build it, but you do to run it; including unit tests
  • You may need to run Clean and/or manually delete bin, obj, and possibly .vs to clear out initial Visual Studio warnings
  • You may need to perform an explicit NuGet restore (ex: dotnet restore) to clear initial Visual Studio warnings
  • Visual Studio appears to require the target .NET Framework be installed
  • The example shown targets .NET Framework 4.0 with .NET Framework 4.8 installed
  • Targeting .NET Framework 2.0 or 3.5 compiled via command-line, but not Visual Studio, likely because I don't have them installed
  • If Visual Studio is still giving you grief:
    • Add at least one supported target framework moniker (ex: net48)
    • Use Visual Studio Code (I prefer full VS, but it's an option)
12
  • 1
    Question. What if the web app in question doesn't actually contain a csproj file? Surely then, if you can't open the project to use the package manager UI; you're screwed? Mar 9, 2022 at 14:58
  • 1
    The original question indicated C# and, hence, *.csproj. This approach, however, will work for any MSBuild project be it *.vbproj or a vanilla *.proj. Ultimately, you just need NuGet support. If you're using an older project system or have no project file at all, then you can use the NuGet CLI (e.g. nuget.exe) with packages.config to install the package locally. If you're compiling .NET code with a Web App, MSBuild must be involved somewhere because that's how the compiler is integrated. Connecting package *.targets to your app will enable the magic. Mar 10, 2022 at 15:19
  • 2
    Didn't work for me, so not as easy as you say it seems. Still gives the error on load and won't open the project after adding those lines to the csproj. Jun 2, 2022 at 20:17
  • @BrentKilboy, you don't need to modify the project by hand unless you want to. I don't have enough context. If you have a Gist, repo, or some more context, I'm happy to elaborate. This is the official way to for it to be performed. It's also possible your build state is dirty. It might be worth clearing out bin and obj, then doing a project rebuild. Jun 2, 2022 at 22:47
  • 1
    @HusamEbish yes - absolutely. You could easily add this to Build.Directory.props or Build.Directory.targets` once and all 1000+ projects would be updated. This is how I manage legacy .NET Frameworks in big OSS projects. This is also how the .NET team manages it themselves. Nov 2, 2022 at 17:30
12

From the comments on the article linked from the answer about copying the files: "Install "Windows 8 SDK". And it can just install ".Net Framework 4.5 Software Development Kit". No other baggage."

This option was the quickest for me, as I can run an elevated installer easier than switching to elevated to write to the program files folders.

enter image description here

5
5

Another way to install multiple older targeting packs is to install Visual Studio 2019.

Note: it will delete them again if you uninstall VS2019, so take a copy of the ones you want and paste them back afterwards.

enter image description here

2
  • Not very good, as copying such files instead of installing from the original sources (SDK or Developer Packs) makes it hard to clean up.
    – Lex Li
    Jan 2, 2023 at 6:43
  • @Lex Li I'm not sure what you mean. A Visual Studio 2019 install is an original source. And uninstalling it will clean the files up.
    – Appetere
    Jan 4, 2023 at 15:10
4

Here is an automated solution. It follows the steps in this answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/70109092/569302 When it copies the files a dialog may appear that you have to click to replace files that already exist

(Note: You may need to update the "version" "1.0.2" to whatever is latest if there's a newer NuGet package)

Run await DevHelpers.Download();

using Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO.Compression;
using System.Linq;
using System.Net;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace j.Dev
{
    public class DevHelpers
    {
        public static async Task Download()
        {
            var version = "1.0.2";
            var name = "Framework45-" + DateTimeToFileString(DateTime.Now);
            var fileName = $"{name}.zip";
            var url = $"https://www.nuget.org/api/v2/package/Microsoft.NETFramework.ReferenceAssemblies.net45/{version}";
            await DownloadFile(fileName, url);
            ZipFile.ExtractToDirectory(fileName, name);
            var from = Path.Join(name, @"build\.NETFramework\v4.5\");
            var to = @"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework\.NETFramework\v4.5";
            FileSystem.CopyDirectory(from, to, UIOption.AllDialogs);
        }

        private static string DateTimeToFileString(DateTime d)
        {
            return d.ToString("yyyy-dd-M--HH-mm-ss");
        }

        private static async Task DownloadFile(string fileName, string url)
        {
            var uri = new Uri(url);
            HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
            var response = await client.GetAsync(uri);
            using (var fs = new FileStream(
                fileName,
                FileMode.CreateNew))
            {
                await response.Content.CopyToAsync(fs);
            }
        }
    }
}

In my case I needed to download 4.0 AND 4.5, so here is the code that downloads both 4.0 and 4.5:

using Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO;
using System.IO.Compression;

namespace j.Dev
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Example Usage: await DevHelpers.DownloadAndCopyFramework4_0And4_5();
    /// </summary>
    public class DevHelpers
    {
        public static async Task DownloadAndCopyFramework4_0And4_5()
        {
            await DownloadAndCopyFramework4_0();
            await DownloadAndCopyFramework4_5();
        }

        public static async Task DownloadAndCopyFramework4_5()
        {
            await DownloadAndCopyFrameworkGeneric("net45", "v4.5", "1.0.2");
        }

        public static async Task DownloadAndCopyFramework4_0()
        {
            await DownloadAndCopyFrameworkGeneric("net40", "v4.0", "1.0.2");
        }

        public static async Task DownloadAndCopyFrameworkGeneric(string netVersion, string folder, string nugetVersion)
        {
            var name = netVersion + "-" + DateTimeToFileString(DateTime.Now);
            var fileName = $"{name}.zip";
            var url = $"https://www.nuget.org/api/v2/package/Microsoft.NETFramework.ReferenceAssemblies.{netVersion}/{nugetVersion}";
            await DownloadFile(fileName, url);
            ZipFile.ExtractToDirectory(fileName, name);
            var from = Path.Join(name, @"build\.NETFramework\" + folder);
            var to = @"C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework\.NETFramework\" + folder;
            FileSystem.CopyDirectory(from, to, UIOption.AllDialogs);
        }

        private static string DateTimeToFileString(DateTime d)
        {
            return d.ToString("yyyy-dd-M--HH-mm-ss");
        }

        private static async Task DownloadFile(string fileName, string url)
        {
            var uri = new Uri(url);
            HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
            var response = await client.GetAsync(uri);
            using (var fs = new FileStream(
                fileName,
                FileMode.CreateNew))
            {
                await response.Content.CopyToAsync(fs);
            }
        }
    }
}
3
  • 1
    Thanks for the script. I wanted both 4.0 and 4.5 as I have old projects for the class library and Winform app. One question : Does the "var version = "1.0.2" or ("netx0", "vx.0", "1.0.2") matter and is it latest as of today (even though the framework version in old)? Dec 19, 2021 at 19:07
  • "Does the "var version = "1.0.2" or ("netx0", "vx.0", "1.0.2") matter" If I understand correctly: I provided two code solutions. It doesn't matter if you use the first (var version = "1.0.2") or the second (("net45", "v4.5", "1.0.2")). I provided both because the first answers the question on this site precisely and the second may be helpful to others who are Googling. Dec 20, 2021 at 3:27
  • "is it latest as of today (even though the framework version in old)" As of today it is the most recent NuGet package on this website: nuget.org/packages/… If you click "Versions" you can see the latest (Screenshot of NuGet website: ibb.co/Pc43zG5). An enhancement to the code I've written is to check that NuGet website (or do something) to see if there's a newer NuGet package version Dec 20, 2021 at 3:31
4

For .NET 4.0, this command will install it for you if you have the Visual Studio 2019 files cached:

msiexec.exe /i "%ALLUSERSPROFILE%\Microsoft\VisualStudio\Packages\Microsoft.Net.4.TargetingPack,version=4.0.30319.1\netfx_dtp.msi" EXTUI=1

For .NET 4.5, this might work, though I haven't tried it:

msiexec.exe /i "%ALLUSERSPROFILE%\Microsoft\VisualStudio\Packages\Microsoft.Net.4.5.2.TargetingPack,version=4.5.51651.1\netfx_452mtpack.msi" EXTUI=1
3
  • "if you have the Visual Studio 2019 files cached" - what do you mean by this? How do you ensure these are cached? the folders are there but there's no msi inside.
    – Nyerguds
    Jan 8, 2023 at 14:16
  • @Nyerguds: When you install VS2019 (or 2017, I think), the installer files are normally cached in that directory unless you tell it not to. If you don't have the files then perhaps it didn't need that component during the install? You can also use the installer with the layout argument to have it cache files alongside the installer - then look inside that folder for these files.
    – user541686
    Jan 8, 2023 at 15:59
  • My problem was actually creating a new project on older frameworks, and it turns out that the issue preventing me from selecting older frameworks was simply the new .csproj format they use. Starts with <Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk"> rather than the normal xml one with xmlns definition.
    – Nyerguds
    Jan 10, 2023 at 8:30
1

I had this issue with a project targeting both .NET Framework 4.5.2 and .NET 6 in VS2022, Windows 11, and fixed it by downloading the developer pack directly from Microsoft. The accepted answer did not work for me.

I used the link suggested by the compiler error I got: https://aka.ms/msbuild/developerpacks, and found 4.5.2 in the "out of support versions" section. It's in a collapsed pane so you have to click the "out of support" element.

Direct link: https://dotnet.microsoft.com/en-us/download/dotnet-framework/thank-you/net452-developer-pack-offline-installer

1

A auto script in powershell to install the .NET Framework in VS22 (assuming is installed in the default path)

$isAdmin = ([Security.Principal.WindowsPrincipal][Security.Principal.WindowsIdentity]::GetCurrent()).IsInRole([Security.Principal.WindowsBuiltInRole]::Administrator)

if (-not $isAdmin) {
    Start-Process powershell.exe -Verb RunAs -ArgumentList "-File `"$PSCommandPath`""
    exit
}

$versions = @("net40", "net45", "net451", "net452", "net46", "net461", "net462", "net47", "net471", "net472", "net48")

foreach ($version in $versions) {
    $url = "https://www.nuget.org/api/v2/package/Microsoft.NETFramework.ReferenceAssemblies.$version"
    $outputZip = Join-Path -Path $env:TEMP -ChildPath "Microsoft.NETFramework.ReferenceAssemblies.$version.zip"
    $outputFolder = "C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework\.NETFramework\"

    Invoke-WebRequest -Uri $url -OutFile $outputZip
    Expand-Archive -Path $outputZip -DestinationPath $outputFolder\tmp -force
    xcopy "$outputFolder\tmp\build\.NETFramework\*" $outputFolder /E /H /Y
    Remove-Item $outputZip -Force
    Remove-Item $outputFolder\tmp -Recurse -Force
}
0

Execute VS2022Net4NotCompileFix

Download Url

this exe file download VS2019 Net4Compile and auto install

0

The following is what I did yesterday when several of my projects did not find the target framework 4.5. After I installed Visual Studio 2019 and in Individual components check the .Net Framework 4.5 section (in Visual Studio 2022 there is no this option).

Hope this helps.

Install Visual Studio 2019 > Individual Component > Check On Net Framework Target 4.5

Install Visual Studio 2019 > Individual Component > Check On Net Framework Target 4.5

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