3

We have a resource called messages. We want to have two ways of listing its collection. One would return only messages that are mandatory and have been viewed; the other, all messages. Each one has fields that are not necessary for the other, thus we would like to not return them. E.g.

One response should look like this:

public class MessageListingResponse {
    private Long messageId;
    private String title;
    private String imageUrl;
    private LocalDateTime createdAt;
    private Boolean isViewed;
}

The other one is like this:

public class MandatoryMessageListingResponse {
    private Long messageId;
    private String title;
    private String imageUrl;
    private LocalDateTime createdAt;
    private String description;
}

I could not find a common rule for this scenario. So, which option follows REST?

  • /messages/mandatories
  • /messages?view=mandatories
  • /messages?mandatoryListing=true
  • /mandatory-messages

3 Answers 3

4

I could not find a common rule for this scenario. So, which option follows REST?

REST doesn't care what spelling conventions you use for your resource identifiers.

In particular, the machines don't care whether or not the spelling of the identifier matches the semantics of the resource (reminder: URL shorteners work)

/messages/mandatories
/messages?view=mandatories
/messages?mandatoryListing=true
/mandatory-messages

Those are all fine.

There are some purely mechanical differences; a query with key value pairs is convenient when using HTML forms as URI templates. A path hierarchy is convenient when using dot-segments and relative resolution to describe other identifiers in the same hierarchy.

Identifiers as text show up in a number of places - we paste URI into messages, they are tracked in browser histories, they appear in your access logs. So we have a lot of different humans looking at the identifiers in different contexts. Try to choose a spelling that's tolerable for all of them; but optimize as best you can which ever experience is most important.

1
  • You're right, but the first and the last are not recommanded as best REST practices. Of course, you can you what you want at the end.
    – JFPicard
    Nov 22, 2021 at 18:56
2

This is borderline opinion-based but this is how I would do it. The most RESTful way would be using a query parameter, so something like /messages?view=mandatories. The problem with this (might not be a problem for your use case, you need to think about it) is that the response model will need to be the same as for /messages, which means that you would need to have a model as follows (merging MessageListingResponse and MandatoryMessageListingResponse):

public class MessageListingResponse {
    private Long messageId;
    private String title;
    private String imageUrl;
    private LocalDateTime createdAt;
    private Boolean isViewed;
    private String description;
}

If this is not wanted (I would also avoid it), then I would go with a not-so-RESTful approach, such as /messages/mandatories. It is not so RESTful because messages are your resource and the following path information should be an ID so that you can get only one message. Another possibility would be something like /messages/view:mandatories which I understand might seem weird to most people. Whatever structure you use, with this approach you have the benefit of having a specific model for this and thus you can have very specific model for each endpoint, avoiding properties that would be null in some cases and not null in another.

1
  • If messages and mandatory messages are two separate class, then probably they need / messages and /mandatories
    – JFPicard
    Nov 22, 2021 at 18:57
1

First of all, if it's messages, then /messages should be there because the resource is message.

After that, messages/mandatories means that there a listing of mandatories, that it's a subset of messages. Do you intend to add or update a mandatory message with put, post or patch, messages/mandatories is the right way.

But if it's only a filter for messages that are mandatory, the best way to do it is with a GET like this: /messages?status=mandatories

Where status is the field that indicate if the message is mandatory

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  • 1
    That's what I initially thought, but after a look at the REST documentation, I found that all subset examples use a path variable {id}, indicating that the subset is a variable of a message, but that's not the case because the 'mandatory' is just a different representation of the messages and is therefore not a subset of a single message. Source: restfulapi.net/resource-naming at "1.2. Collection and Sub-collection Resources" paragraph. Nov 22, 2021 at 15:48

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