2

I need to copy date from one source (in parallel) to another with batches.

I did this:

 Flux.generate((SynchronousSink<String> sink) -> {
                    try {
                        String val = dataSource.getNextItem();
                        if (val == null) {
                            sink.complete();
                            return;
                        }
                        sink.next(val);

                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                        sink.error(e);
                    }
                })
                .parallel(4)
                .runOn(Schedulers.parallel())
                .doOnNext(dataTarget::write)
                .sequential()
                .blockLast();
class dataSource{
  public Item getNextItem(){ 
    //...
  }
}
class dataTarget{
  public void write(List<Item> items){ 
    //...
  }
}

It receives data in parallel, but writes one at a time.

I need to collect them in batches (like by 10 items) and then write the batch.

How can I do that?

UPDATE:

The main idea that the source is the messaging system (i.e. rabbitmq or nats) that's suitable to efficiently send messages one by one, but the target is the database which is more efficient on inserting a batch.

So the final result should be like — I receive messages in parallel until buffer is not filled up, then I write all the buffer into database by one shot.

It's easy to do in regular java, but in case of streams — I don't get how to do it. How to buffer the data and how to pause the reader till the writer is not ready to get next part.

2
  • What do you mean "source". What kind of source? It would help if you show the write method.
    – lkatiforis
    Dec 4, 2021 at 19:27
  • @lkatiforis i read messages from messaging system (nats.io) in parallel one by one and I need it to put into database by 1000 records per one insert. Updated the question
    – Roman
    Dec 6, 2021 at 14:27

3 Answers 3

1

All you need is Flux#buffer(int maxSize) operator:

Flux.generate((SynchronousSink<String> sink) -> {
        try {
            String val = dataSource.getNextItem();
            if (val == null) {
                sink.complete();
                return;
            }
            sink.next(val);

        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            sink.error(e);
        }
    })
    .buffer(10) //Flux<List<String>>
    .flatMap(dataTarget::write)
    .blockLast();

class DataTarget{
    public Mono<Void> write(List<String> items){
         return reactiveDbClient.insert(items);
    }
}

Here, buffer collects items into multiple List's of 10 items(batches). You do not need to use parallel scheduler. The flatmap will run these operations asynchronously. See Understanding Reactive’s .flatMap() Operator.

1
  • this is exactly what I need! so simple and short ) thank you
    – Roman
    Dec 7, 2021 at 12:19
0

You need to do your heavy work in individual Publisher-s which will be materialized in flatMap() in parallel. Like this

Flux.generate((SynchronousSink<String> sink) -> {
    try {
        String val = dataSource.getNextItem();
        if (val == null) {
            sink.complete();
            return;
        }
        sink.next(val);

    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        sink.error(e);
    }
})
.parallel(4)
.runOn(Schedulers.parallel())
.flatMap(item -> Mono.fromCallable(() -> dataTarget.write(item)))
.sequential()
.blockLast();
3
  • That doesn't solve my issue. For example I read from message broker that efficient in read-one strategy, but then I write data into database that works efficient on batch inserts, neither on inserting one row in a time. That's why I need to collect lets say 1000 items, and then write them once.
    – Roman
    Dec 6, 2021 at 14:23
  • I see. Ok, I thought you wanted to write in parallel (which you could do for batches as well). In the accepted answer you'll be bottlenecked if destination is much slower than source but has unlimited horizontal scalability (e.g. AWS S3).
    – expert
    Dec 7, 2021 at 15:06
  • that's a good point
    – Roman
    Dec 10, 2021 at 8:13
0

Best approach (from algorithmic view) is to have ringbuffer and use microbatching technique. Writes to ringbuffer is done from rabbitmq, one-by-one (or multiple in parallel). Reading thread (single only) would get all messages at once (presented at a time of batch start), insert them into database and do it again... All at once means single message (if there is only one), or bunch of them (if they have been accumulated while duration of last insert was long enough to).

This technique is used also in jdbc (if I remember correctly) and can be implemented easily using lmax disruptor library in java.

Sample project (using ractor /Flux/ and System.out.println) can be found on https://github.com/luvarqpp/reactorBatch

Core code:

    final Flux<String> stringFlux = Flux.interval(Duration.ofMillis(1)).map(x -> "Msg number " + x);

    final Flux<List<String>> stringFluxMicrobatched = stringFlux
            .bufferTimeout(100, Duration.ofNanos(1));

    stringFluxMicrobatched.subscribe(strings -> {
        // Batch insert into DB
        System.out.print("Inserting in batch " + strings.size() + " strings.");
        try {
            // Inserting into db is simulated by 10 to 40 ms sleep here...
            Thread.sleep(rnd.nextInt(30) + 10);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println(" ... Done");
    });

Please feel welcome to edit and improve this post with name of technique and references. This is community wiki...

1
  • could you provide an example?
    – Roman
    Dec 10, 2021 at 8:11

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