0

I'm trying to generate pdf pages from chess postions saved as a string, also called FEN notation. The code I'm currently using requires me to save the svg, convert it to png and save it, call it using fpdf to place it on a pdf page. I'm trying to figure out how to do this all from memory and not save the image files in between. I've tried working with the StringIO package and BytesIO but so far have been unable to make it work.

from fpdf import FPDF
import chess
import chess.svg

FEN = "8/8/8/8/4N3/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"

board = chess.Board(FEN)
boardsvg = chess.svg.board(board,size=600)

f = open("BoardVisualisedFromFEN.SVG", "w")
f.write(boardsvg)
f.close()

from svglib.svglib import svg2rlg
from reportlab.graphics import renderPM

image_path = "BoardVisualisedFromFEN.SVG"
drawing = svg2rlg(image_path)
renderPM.drawToFile(drawing,"file.png",fmt='PNG')

Margin = 25
ImageSize = 74

pdf = FPDF()
pdf.add_page()
pdf.image("file.png",Margin,Margin,w=ImageSize,h=ImageSize)
pdf.output('FPDFTestPage.pdf','F')

I initially tried to convert the svg to a StringIO and assign the png to a BytesIO, however I get an error message.

line 150, in wrapper return fn(self, *args, **kwargs) line 963, in image pos=name.rfind('.') AttributeError: '_io.BytesIO' object has no attribute 'rfind' The code I used is as follows: from fpdf import FPDF import chess import chess.svg import io

FEN = "8/8/8/8/4N3/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"

board = chess.Board(FEN)
boardsvg = chess.svg.board(board,size=600)
imgdata = io.StringIO(boardsvg)

from svglib.svglib import svg2rlg

drawing = svg2rlg(imgdata)
str = drawing.asString("png")
imageIO = io.BytesIO(str)

Margin = 25
ImageSize = 74

pdf = FPDF()
pdf.add_page()
pdf.image(imageIO,Margin,Margin,w=ImageSize,h=ImageSize)
pdf.output('FPDFTestPage.pdf','F')
3
  • @KJ: What's your point?
    – martineau
    Nov 23, 2021 at 21:41
  • @KJ: ...and in relation to that you're saying what?
    – martineau
    Nov 23, 2021 at 21:49
  • 1
    @KJ: Ah, yes, totally agree. Unneeded optimization of working code is even worse than premature optimization — the "root of all evil" according to some. ;¬)
    – martineau
    Nov 23, 2021 at 22:01

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.