12

Edit: Thanks to @NateEldredge, I better defined my question in How to 'tag' a location in a C source file for a later breakpoint definition?


I use those labels to setup breakpoints in gdb. So no matter if I add/remove lines of code after/before the label, the breakpoint is still correct.

If I add -Wno-error=unused-label to the compilation options, the compiler does not yell at me, but the label disappears from the assembly.

If instead, I use __attribute__((unused)) in the code, the result is the same: no complain, but the label is gone.

Is there a correct way of getting this done (instead of just a hack)?

Here is my toy example:

int main(void){
    int a = 15;
 label: __attribute__((unused))
    a = a + 23;
    return a;
}

After compilation, it results in:

main:
        push    ebp
        mov     ebp, esp
        sub     esp, 16
        mov     DWORD PTR [ebp-4], 15
        add     DWORD PTR [ebp-4], 23
        mov     eax, DWORD PTR [ebp-4]
        leave
        ret

Here an interactive version of the same example: https://godbolt.org/z/zTqd9bM6q


$ gcc --version
gcc (GCC) 10.3.1 20210422 (Red Hat 10.3.1-1)
Copyright (C) 2020 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
20
  • 3
    You could goto right before the label.
    – dbush
    Nov 23, 2021 at 19:45
  • 6
    How about __asm__("label:");
    – Jester
    Nov 23, 2021 at 19:45
  • 1
    This could be a good question. But: your example code should be presented here , IMHO. Nov 23, 2021 at 19:47
  • 2
    Since this is only for debugging, you could put uses of the labels inside statements that are conditionally compiled (inside something like #if DEBUG … #endif), such as volatile int x; switch(x) { case 0: goto foo; case 1: goto bar; … }. Nov 23, 2021 at 20:00
  • 3
    Be aware that __asm__("label:") can fail. During optimization, the compiler might decide to duplicate code, resulting in the label appear twice in assembly code, which will usually cause compilation to fail. Or it might be removed when the compiler determines execution can never pass through it (although then putting a breakpoint there would be useless anyway, as it would never be hit). Nov 23, 2021 at 20:02

2 Answers 2

7

If you want to have a label that doesn't get removed or renamed, try this:

    asm volatile("mylabel:");

Note that having this label might affect how GCC optimizes your function. However, the volatile keyword will probably help prevent it from doing anything that would cause problems.

Also note that you can use __asm__ instead of asm. Both appear to work in GCC.

3
  • 1
    __asm__ works even with -std=c++11. asm only works with the default -std=gnu11, i.e. allow GNU extensions in parts of the global namespace that aren't reserved for implementation-defined stuff. Nov 24, 2021 at 6:11
  • 2
    As discussed in comments under the question, this will have problems when inlining or loop unrolling, because the label will be in multiple places in one .s file (which is an error). Also, don't use GNU C Basic Asm; recent GCC versions treat non-empty Basic asm template strings as having a "memory" clobber, so will hurt optimization more than necessary. Either use asm("mylabel:" ::: "memory"); explicitly if you want to force the compiler to have memory (except for non-escaped locals) in sync with the C abstract machine, or asm("mylabel:" :::); if not. Nov 24, 2021 at 6:14
  • 1
    And optionally use "mylabel%=:" in those extended statements to have GCC invent unique numbers as part of the label name; it may still tab-complete in GDB. How Do I Use Labels In GCC Inline Assembly? Nov 24, 2021 at 6:17
4

You can silence the unused label warning... by using it:

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    int a = 15;
    goto label; label:
    a = a + 23;
    return a;
}

This keeps the label in the assembly (albeit using an internal name):

main:
.LFB0:
        push    ebp
        mov     ebp, esp
        sub     esp, 16
        mov     DWORD PTR [ebp-4], 15
        nop
.L2:
        add     DWORD PTR [ebp-4], 23
        mov     eax, DWORD PTR [ebp-4]
        leave
        ret

I would suggest using a macro to reduce effort and show intent better:

#define DEBUG_LABEL(x) goto x; x:
6
  • That nop isn't for alignment; when GCC wants alignment, it uses .p2align because it doesn't keep track of instruction sizes. It leaves that up to the assembler. GCC -O0 does sometimes include a nop in tiny functions even without goto shenanigans, like in void bar(){}. godbolt.org/z/9jGrGveYd. Of course, this trick only works at all with -O0, with any optimization the label disappears (godbolt.org/z/hfeeGzcd5), so efficiency is mostly irrelevant. Nov 23, 2021 at 23:14
  • Doesn't this defeat the whole point of the label for my use case: to be used in gdb to set breakpoints. If the name is not the same, then I cannot reference it in my .gdbinit file.
    – onlycparra
    Nov 23, 2021 at 23:35
  • 2
    @onlycparra: Well then C labels were useless for your use case all along, because they do not translate to labels with the same name in assembly. (That couldn't work, if you think about it: different functions can contain labels with the same name, not to mention inlining.) Nov 24, 2021 at 0:10
  • @onlycparra: As such, I think this is kind of an XY problem. The real question, which I think is a good one, would just be "how can I 'tag' a location in a source file so as to be able to set a breakpoint there". Nov 24, 2021 at 0:19
  • 2
    @onlycparra: At this point I would probably post it as a brand new question, maybe with a link to this one. Nov 24, 2021 at 0:58

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