5

Why does the below code print error msg instead of ABC\nerror msg?

class CustomException(Exception):
    """ABC"""
    def __init__(self, *args):
        super().__init__(*args)
        self.__str__ = self._wrapper(self.__str__)
    def _wrapper(self, f):
        def _inner(*args, **kwargs):
            return self.__doc__ + '\n' + f(*args, **kwargs)
        return _inner

print(CustomException('error msg'))
9
  • 1
    __str__ is called on the class CustomException, not on the individual object. You're only changing __str__ on the individual object self.
    – khelwood
    Nov 25, 2021 at 11:54
  • Is there a reason why you attempt the wrap-and-replace of __str__ instead of just re-implementing the __str__ method and calling super().__str__()? Nov 25, 2021 at 11:59
  • @khelwood true, I totally missed that, thanks for a hint. MisterMiyagi, no, no reason other than overcomplicating things :) I'll do it your way, thanks as well!
    – alex
    Nov 25, 2021 at 12:00
  • @khelwood __str__ is called on the class CustomException, not on the individual object. I'm a bit confused. Isn't __str__ an instance method?
    – TheScore
    Nov 25, 2021 at 12:13
  • @TheScore It is an instance method in the sense that an instance is its first argument; but it is looked up on the class, and called passing the instance as the first argument. Generally that's the way magic methods are called.
    – khelwood
    Nov 25, 2021 at 12:15

3 Answers 3

4

Forget the Exception class for now. Consider this:

class A:
    def __str__(self):
        return 'A'

obj = A()
print(obj)
obj.__str__ = lambda x: 'B'
print(obj)
A.__str__ = lambda x: 'B'
print(obj)

output:

A
A   # Not B !
B

Dunder methods' lookup is different in Python. From docs:

For custom classes, implicit invocations of special methods are only guaranteed to work correctly if defined on an object’s type, not in the object’s instance dictionary.

What you want to achieve is:

class CustomException(Exception):
    """ABC"""

    def __init__(self, *args):
        super().__init__(*args)

    def __str__(self):
        return self.__doc__ + '\n' + super().__str__()


print(CustomException('error msg'))

output:

ABC
error msg
1

Operations backed by special methods usually explicitly look up the special method as a proper method not just as a callable attribute. Concretely, instead of self.__str__ the interpreter roughly looks at type(self).__str__.__get__(self, type(self)) – i.e. a descriptor __str__ on the class to be bound with the instance. To override a special method, it is thus necessary to override the class' descriptor instead of the instance' attribute.

This can be done by a) declaring the special method as a slot, which handles the type(self).__str__ part, and b) assigning a function, which handles the __get__(self, type(self)) part.

class CustomException(Exception):
    """ABC"""
    __slots__ = ("__str__",)  # <<< magic

    def __init__(self, *args):
        super().__init__(*args)
        # vvv self.__str__ is the class' slot
        self.__str__ = self._wrapper(super().__str__)
        #                            AAA real __str__ lives on the super class
    def _wrapper(self, f):
        def _inner(*args, **kwargs):
            return self.__doc__ + '\n' + f(*args, **kwargs)
        return _inner

print(CustomException('error msg'))

Note that since every instance behaves the same in this case, it is advisable to just define a new __str__ method in practice.

1

As per @khelwood's reply in the comments this code works as intended:

class CustomException(Exception):
    """ABC"""
    def __init__(self, *args):
        super().__init__(*args)
        self.__class__.__str__ = self._wrapper(self.__str__)
    def _wrapper(self, f):
        def _inner(*args, **kwargs):
            return self.__doc__ + '\n' + f()
        return _inner

but I ended up with this equivalent (@MisterMiyagi):

class CustomException(Exception):
    """ABC"""
    def __str__(self):
        return self.__doc__ + '\n' + super().__str__()
4
  • 1
    The first example doesn't really work as intended, as each instance of CustomException you create will change how __str__ works for all instances.
    – chepner
    Nov 25, 2021 at 13:08
  • @chepner how can this issue be addressed?
    – alex
    Nov 25, 2021 at 13:11
  • 1
    By properly defining an instance method named __str__, rather than creating an instance attribute named __str__.
    – chepner
    Nov 25, 2021 at 13:15
  • If you also want the first example to work(which I don't recommend), you should change self._wrapper(self.__str__) to self._wrapper(super().__str__) , otherwise the more you create CustomException('error msg') object the more you get ABC in the output. test it
    – S.B
    Nov 26, 2021 at 0:10

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