4

I am new to Coq and was wondering what is the difference between the following things:

Class test (f g: nat -> nat) := {
  init:   f 0 = 0 /\ g 0 = 0;
  output: ...another proposition about f and g...;
}.

and

Class test := {
  f: nat -> nat;
  g: nat -> nat;
  init:   f 0 = 0 /\ g 0 = 0;
  output: ...another proposition about f and g...;
}.

Could anyone provide an explanation ?

1
  • For those interested in Proof Assistants, there is a new proposed SE site ProofAssistants
    – Guy Coder
    Commented Nov 27, 2021 at 15:53

2 Answers 2

6

The difference between them is referred to as bundling.

Class test (f g: nat -> nat) := {
  init:   f 0 = 0 /\ g 0 = 0;
  output: ...another proposition about f and g...;
}.

is unbundled, and

Class test := {
  f: nat -> nat;
  g: nat -> nat;
  init:   f 0 = 0 /\ g 0 = 0;
  output: ...another proposition about f and g...;
}.

is bundled.

The advantage of bundling is that you don't need to always provide f and g. The advantage of unbundling is that you can have different instances of the same class sharing the same f and g. If you bundle them, Coq will not be easily convinced that different instances share parameters.

You can read more about this in Type Classes for Mathematics in Type Theory.

5

To complement Ana’s excellent answer, here is a practical difference:

  • the unbundled version (call it utest) allows you to write the logical statement utest f g about a specific pair of functions f and g,
  • whereas the bundled version (call it btest) allows you to state that there exists a pair of functions which satisfies the properties; you can later refer to these functions by the projection names f and g.

So, roughly speaking:

  • btest is “equivalent” to ∃ f g, utest f g;
  • utest f' g' is “equivalent” to btest ∧ “the f (resp. g) in the aforementioned proof of btest is equal to f' (resp. g')”.

More formally, here are the equivalences for a minimal example (in this code, the notation { x : A | B } is a dependent pair type, i.e. the type of (x, y) where x : A and y : B and the type B depends on the value x):

(* unbundled: *)
Class utest (x : nat) : Prop := {
  uprop : x = 0;
}.

(* bundled: *)
Class btest : Type := {
  bx : nat;
  bprop : bx = 0;
}.

(* [btest] is equivalent to: *)

Goal { x : nat | utest x } -> btest.
Proof.
  intros [x u]. econstructor. exact (@uprop x u).
Qed.

Goal btest -> { x : nat | utest x }.
Proof.
  intros b. exists (@bx b). constructor. exact (@bprop b).
Qed.

(* [utest x] is equivalent to: *)

Goal forall x, { b : btest | @bx b = x } -> utest x.
Proof.
  intros x [b <-]. constructor. exact (@bprop b).
Qed.

Goal forall x, utest x -> { b : btest | @bx b = x }.
Proof.
  intros x u. exists {| bx := x ; bprop := @uprop x u |}. reflexivity.
Qed.

(* NOTE: Here I’ve explicited all implicit arguments; in fact, you
   can let Coq infer them, and write just [bx], [bprop], [uprop]
   instead of [@bx b], [@bprop b], [@uprop x u]. *)

In this example, we can also observe a difference with respect to computational relevance: utest can live in Prop, because its only member, uprop, is a proposition. On the other hand, I cannot really put btest in Prop, because that would mean that both bx and bprop would live in Prop but bf is computationally relevant. In other words, Coq gives you this warning:

Class btest : Prop := {
  bx : nat;
  bprop : bx = 0;
}.
(* WARNING:
     bx cannot be defined because it is informative and btest is not.
     bprop cannot be defined because the projection bx was not defined.
*)

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