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I get this assertion failure even though I do not think I should. After I run I get an assertion failed message. Any idea on what should I do?

#include <assert.h>

/**
 * Increment integer.
 *
 * @param j The integer to increment.
 *
 * @return The result of j incremented.
 */
int16_t increment(int16_t j) {
    return ++j;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    const int n_increments = 100000; // Increment 100000 times.

    int16_t old_value = 0;
    int16_t new_value = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < n_increments; ++i) {
        new_value = increment(old_value);
        printf("%i",(new_value == (old_value + 1)));
        assert(new_value == (old_value + 1));
        old_value = new_value;
    }

    return 0;
}
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  • 1
    That's to be expected when you use a 16-bit integer and try to loop to 100000. You'll fail as soon as you reach 2^15.
    – Passerby
    Nov 29, 2021 at 0:05
  • wont it just loop around? Nov 29, 2021 at 0:16
  • 1
    When it does, new_value == -32768 and old_value == 32767, so new_value == old_value + 1 is not true.
    – Passerby
    Nov 29, 2021 at 0:18
  • 3
    Thanks but I don't care about votes, happy to help.
    – Passerby
    Nov 29, 2021 at 0:24
  • 1
    Note that integer overflow on a signed value is undefined behavior, so the entire program is considered invalid (according to the C++ spec). If you want well-defined behavior on overflow, use unsigned integer types instead. Nov 29, 2021 at 3:21

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