25

I'm new to C++ programming, but have been working in C and Java for a long time. I'm trying to do an interface-like hierarchy in some serial protocol I'm working on, and keep getting the error:

Undefined reference to 'operator delete(void*)'

The (simplified) code follows below:

PacketWriter.h:

class PacketWriter {
public:
    virtual ~PacketWriter() {}
    virtual uint8_t nextByte() = 0;
}

StringWriter.h:

class StringWriter : public PacketWriter {
public:
    StringWriter(const char* message);
    virtual uint8_t nextByte();
}

The constructor and nextByte functions are implemented in StringWriter.cpp, but nothing else. I need to be able to delete a StringWriter from a pointer to a PacketWriter, and i've been getting various other similar errors if I define a destructor for StringWriter, virtual or not. I'm sure it's a simple issue that I'm overlooking as a newbie.

Also, I'm writing this for an AVR chip, using avr-g++ on Windows.

Thanks

10
  • 11
    How do you run the compiler ? If you use avr-gcc or something like that, then you should rather use avr-g++ or equivalent. Aug 10, 2011 at 17:43
  • 1
    Are you linking this in a peculiar way? If you link against the usual runtime, implementations of operator new and operator delete are provided, but if you do something bareback you may need to define those yourself.
    – Kerrek SB
    Aug 10, 2011 at 17:45
  • 2
    This error would occur if you didn't link the C++ standard libraries into the final executable. Are you linking this in? Aug 10, 2011 at 17:45
  • 4
    I am pretty sure new/delete are not being implemented, and for a good reason, it is an embedded system. Read the documentation properly. Aug 10, 2011 at 17:53
  • 1
    @hexa: good catch: nongnu.org/avr-libc/user-manual/FAQ.html#faq_cplusplus . You can probably post this as an answer Aug 10, 2011 at 17:55

4 Answers 4

50

Sorry for posting in an old thread, but it's still pretty high in Google's search results and if you have this problem, you really should check out this link, because there it says that you simply need to link -lstdc++ and this is what solved the problem for me.

The following line was added by the Community without highlighting it as such and instead of just adding a comment to my answer for reasons that elude me: "Or use a C++ compiler that will implicitly add the -lstdc++ option, e.g. g++."

4
  • 2
    FYI. Linking in stdc++ doesn't necessarily fix this issue. I am using -lstdc++ and tried g++ as well, but still see this issue. Jul 6, 2016 at 23:27
  • 3
    I have been banging my head against a wall for several weeks now trying to figure out why my CUDA code would not run properly. I tried everything I could possibly find. Your comment fixed everything, saved the day, solved my life, and I love you so much. Thank you thank you thank you thank you!!!!!
    – boof
    Feb 22, 2017 at 6:22
  • 1
    make sure -lstdc++ goes "after" FWIW
    – rogerdpack
    Feb 23, 2018 at 21:38
  • 1
    Solved my problem magically .Thank you! For later readers' reference: I am trying to link a C++ library called libzmq from my embedded Linux C code. If I use a C++ compiler everything is fine, but if I have to use a C compiler for some reason. Then I see all those undefined errors. Adding -lstdc++ solves the problem. Oct 10, 2018 at 19:30
19

If you are not linking against the standard library for some reason (as may well be the case in an embedded scenario), you have to provide your own operators new and delete. In the simplest case, you could simply wrap malloc, or allocate memory from your own favourite source:

void * operator new(std::size_t n)
{
  void * const p = std::malloc(n);
  // handle p == 0
  return p;
}

void operator delete(void * p) // or delete(void *, std::size_t)
{
  std::free(p);
}

You should never have to do this if you are compiling for an ordinary, hosted platform, so if you do need to do this, you better be familiar with the intricacies of memory management on your platform.

6
  • It seems that there is no standard library support for this chip: nongnu.org/avr-libc/user-manual/FAQ.html#faq_cplusplus . The behaviour of new and delete that the OP observes is even documented. Aug 10, 2011 at 17:57
  • I know there are implementations of malloc and free for the AVR in C. If I just wrap those up once somewhere, will they work for all objects? Where would I put that code?
    – Bracket
    Aug 10, 2011 at 18:06
  • You put the code just anywhere in the global namespace and link against it. If you don't want malloc, you could also allocate memory from some pool area and maintain a free list or something like that.
    – Kerrek SB
    Aug 10, 2011 at 18:08
  • Okay, that seems to work (or at least compile without error :P). Thanks!
    – Bracket
    Aug 10, 2011 at 18:14
  • Cool, but do beware, you really have to know what you're doing and where you're getting your memory from. I think malloc is a very dangerous beast in the embedded world, but I'm not an expert by a long shot.
    – Kerrek SB
    Aug 10, 2011 at 18:15
10

I will just quote the documentation, since they put it better.

Writing C++

You can write programs for the AVR platform in C++, if you included c++ in the enabled-languages during configuration of avr-gcc. Just about everything in the Writing C AVR programs section applies, so read that first.

The major drawbacks of using C++ are:

C++ calling convention side-effects
No libstdc++ support.

C++ calling convention side-effects

Certain C++ features will automatically generate implied code if required, which can waste valuable program memory space and processor time. For instance, if at some point in the program a function is passed a C++ object by value:

void myfunction(MyCppClass object);

You will wind up with a default copy constructor being generated and called to create the temporary copy of object used in myfunction(). Be careful if this isn't what you want: equivalent behavior should be attainable by passing a reference to a constant MyCppClass object, while avoiding the code and execution overhead.

Missing libstdc++ and other C++ features

None of the C++ standard templates, classes or functions are available. In addition, operators new and delete have yet to be implemented.

C++ exception support is also lacking. You'll probably need to make sure to use the -fno-exceptions compiler option to turn off the exceptions in the C++ front-end.

What does work? Even though lots of the C++ goodies you are accustomed to working with aren't available, it can be worthwhile to program the AVR in C++. Constructors and destructors are functional and just the organizational advantages of using classes and object oriented programming may make C++ a great choice.

1
  • 1
    i will add that "The operators new and delete are not implemented, attempting to use them will cause the linker to complain about undefined external references. (This could perhaps be fixed.)" Jan 18, 2014 at 16:59
6

If you're just looking to do an interface, you don't need new/delete. Just remove the "virtual" from the base class destructor, and make sure the derived class has an implementation of __cxa_pure_virtual().

Here is a compilable example. (I removed the returns to keep things simple, but it works just fine with them.)

In PacketWriter.h

class PacketWriter {
public:
    virtual void nextByte() = 0;
protected:
    ~PacketWriter() {}
};

In StringWriter.h

#include "PacketWriter.h"

class StringWriter : public PacketWriter {
public:
    StringWriter(const char* message);
    void nextByte();
};  

In StringWriter.cpp

#include "StringWriter.h"

// Definition of the error function to call if the constructor goes bonkers
extern "C" void __cxa_pure_virtual() { while (1); }

StringWriter::StringWriter(const char* message)
{
    // constructor code here
}

void StringWriter::nextByte()
{
}

Compile with avr-g++ StringWriter.cpp

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.