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I wrote a recursive solution for the longest increasing subsequence and it worked perfectly fine. But when I applied dp on the same code it gives different answers. Problem Link: https://practice.geeksforgeeks.org/problems/longest-increasing-subsequence-1587115620/1 Recursive code:

int LISrecursive(int arr[], int n, int currIndex, int maxVal) {
    if (currIndex == n) {
        return 0;
    }
    int included = 0, notIncluded = 0;
    if (arr[currIndex] > maxVal) {
        included = 1 + LISrecursive(arr, n, currIndex + 1, arr[currIndex]);
    }
    notIncluded = LISrecursive(arr, n, currIndex + 1, maxVal);

    return max(notIncluded, included);

}

DP Code:

int LISdp(int arr[], int n, int currIndex, int maxVal, vector<int> &dp) {
    if (currIndex == n) {
        return 0;
    }
    if (dp[currIndex] != -1) return dp[currIndex];
    int included = 0, notIncluded = 0;
    if (arr[currIndex] > maxVal) {
        included = 1 + LISdp(arr, n, currIndex + 1, arr[currIndex], dp);
    }
    notIncluded = LISdp(arr, n, currIndex + 1, maxVal, dp);

    return dp[currIndex] = max(notIncluded, included);

}
int32_t main() {
    int n;
    cin >> n;
    int arr[n];
    vector<int> dp(n, -1);
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        cin >> arr[i];
    }
    cout << LISrecursive(arr,n,0,-1); 
    cout << LISdp(arr, n, 0 , -1, dp);
    return 0;
}

I cannot figure out what I did wrong? For this test case 6 (n) 6 3 7 4 6 9 (arr[]) Recursive code gives 4 answer(correct) But DP code gives 3 answer(incorrect)

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  • What is dp in your code?
    – 273K
    Dec 1, 2021 at 6:34
  • dp is a vector initially filled with -1. Dec 1, 2021 at 6:43
  • This fails to compile. No dp declared in your LIS and you do not pass dp to your LIS.
    – 273K
    Dec 1, 2021 at 6:47
  • @UjjvalUjjval I edited your code lightly to make it compile. Try to make it easier for people to help you in the future by making sure your code is a minimal reproducible example
    – Botje
    Dec 1, 2021 at 9:13
  • Consider the input arr=5 1 2 3 and step through that case with a debugger. Your dp entries are remembering values for the first maxVal that comes through, which does not give lowers numbers a chance.
    – Botje
    Dec 1, 2021 at 9:46

2 Answers 2

1

When I think of dynamic programming, I usually break it down into two steps:

  1. Solve the recursion with "including the current element before recursing again" compared to "not including the current element before recursing again". This is exactly what you did with your recursive solution.

  2. Take the recursive solution from step 1 and add a cache of previous computed results to avoid repetitive recursion. The cache, can be conceptualized as a multidimension matrix that maps all the non-const variable parameters passed to the recursive function to the final result.

In your case, each recursive step has two variables, currIndex, and maxVal. a and n are actually constants throughout the entire recursion. The number of non-const parameters of the recursive step is the number of dimensions in your cache. So you need a two dimensional table. We could use a big 2-d int array, but that would take a lot of memory. We can achieve the same efficiency with a nested pair of hash tables.

Your primary mistake is that your cache is only 1 dimension - caching the result compared to currIndex irrespective of the value of maxVal. The other mistake is using a vector instead of a hash table. The vector technique you have works, but doesn't scale. And when we add a second dimension, the scale in terms of memory use are even worse.

So let's defined a cache type as an unordered_map (hash table) that maps currIndex to another hash table that maps maxVal to the result of the recursion. You could also use tuples, but the geeksforgeeks coding site doesn't seem to like that. No bother, we can just define this:

typedef std::unordered_map<int, std::unordered_map<int, int>> CACHE;

Then your DP solution is effectively just inserting a lookup into the CACHE at the top of the recursive function and an insertion into the CACHE at the bottom of the function.

int LISdp(int arr[], int n, int currIndex, int maxVal, CACHE& cache) {
    if (currIndex == n) {
        return 0;
    }

    // check our cache if we've already solved for currIndex and maxVal together
    auto itor1 = cache.find(currIndex);
    if (itor1 != cache.end())
    {
        // itor1->second is a reference to cache[currIndex]
        auto itor2 = itor1->second.find(maxVal);
        if (itor2 != itor1->second.end())
        {
            // itor2->second is a reference to cache[n][maxVal];
            return itor2->second;
        }
    }

    int included = 0, notIncluded = 0;
    if (arr[currIndex] > maxVal) {
        included = 1 + LISdp(arr, n, currIndex + 1, arr[currIndex], cache);
    }
    notIncluded = LISdp(arr, n, currIndex + 1, maxVal, cache);

    // cache the final result into the 2-d map before returning
    int finalresult = std::max(notIncluded, included);
    cache[currIndex][maxVal] = finalresult; // cache the result
    return finalresult;

}

Then the initial invocation with the input set to solve for is effectively passing INT_MIN as the intial maxVal and an empty cache:

int N = 16
int A[N]={0,8,4,12,2,10,6,14,1,9,5,13,3,11,7,15};

CACHE cache;
int result = LISdp(A, N, 0, INT_MIN, cache);

A minor optimization is to make a, n, and cache a member variable of the C++ class encapsulating your solution so that they don't have to be pushed onto the stack for each step of the recursion. The cache is getting passed by reference, so it's not that big of a deal.

5
  • Also, can you please tell me the space and time complexity? Dec 2, 2021 at 8:00
  • What do you think the space and time complexity are? I don't mean to be facetious, but what have you assessed for yourself?
    – selbie
    Dec 2, 2021 at 21:58
  • I think that both the time and space complexity will be O(n^2). Because there are 'n' elements and for each element, we can have 'n' different maxValue. Dec 3, 2021 at 5:25
  • For the recursive only solution, the space requirements are O(N). The LISrecursive function will only recurse until currentIndex == n. Hence, the recursion depth is never more than N. Each recursion stores a fixed number of bytes on the stack and effectively releases those bytes when the function returns and recurses back up. As for runtime, LISrecursive coiuld possibly enumerate over all 2ⁿ possible sequence combinations. Hence, the runtime could easily be O(2ⁿ).
    – selbie
    Dec 5, 2021 at 5:44
  • For the dynamic solution, LISdp could possibly store a cache of N rows with each column holding one of the unique values in the array. Hence, O(N²) for max space complexity. I'm tempted to say that the cache enables the runtime to be O(N²) as well, but I'm not 100% certain.
    – selbie
    Dec 5, 2021 at 5:53
-1

You have 2 problems in your code:

Mistake 1

First in C++, the size of an array must be a compile-time constant.So, take for example the following code snippets:

int n = 10;
int arr[n]; //INCORRECT because n is not a constant expression

The correct way to write the above would be:

const int n = 10;
int arr[n]; //CORRECT

Similarly, the following(which you did in your code example) is incorrect:

 int n;
 cin >> n;
 int arr[n];// INCORRECT because n is not a constant expression

Mistake 2

Second in your function LISdp, it seems to me that there is no need of the statement

if (dp[currIndex] != -1) return dp[currIndex];//no need for this statement

You should just remove this(the above) statement and the program produces expected output 4 as can be seen here. Basically you have not thought this(LISdp's working) through. You can use the debugger to see where you're going wrong.

There might be other problems in your code but so far i am able to spot these 2.

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  • The second "mistake" was actually the entire point of LISdp. If you cut that out you have the same function as LISrecursive, with O(2**n) runtime instead of O(n)
    – Botje
    Dec 1, 2021 at 9:05
  • @Botje I know it was the entire point of LISdp but while writing that statement he made a mistake. A mistake is still a mistake even if it was intentional.
    – Anoop Rana
    Dec 1, 2021 at 9:20
  • Fair enough, but OP is explicitly asking "what is my mistake". Telling them to reduce the DP function to a plain recursive one by removing that line is not very helpful or instructive.
    – Botje
    Dec 1, 2021 at 9:23
  • @Botje Fundamentally, both of OP's functions uses recursion. That is, both are recursive functions. Just because he is passing an extra argument and naming his other function differently doesn't make that a non-recursive function. By pointing out that there is some logic error in his program which he can find if he learns to use the debugger does count as pointing out the mistake because clearly the problem is with that specific line that i mentioned if (dp[currIndex] != -1) return dp[currIndex];
    – Anoop Rana
    Dec 1, 2021 at 9:31
  • This question was tagged as [dynamic-programming]. That is a well-known technique for reducing the running time of exponential algorithms to polynomial time. Do you not see how your answer removes the dynamic programming aspect (and, as mentioned, reverts to O(2**n) instead of O(n))?
    – Botje
    Dec 1, 2021 at 9:35

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