30

Suppose I have a simple Duration class:

class Duration
{
    int seconds;
public:
    Duration(int t_seconds) : seconds(t_seconds) { }
};

int main()
{
    Duration t(30);
    t = 60;
}

And I decide that I don't like being able to implicitly convert from int to Duration. I can make the constructor explicit:

class Duration
{
    int seconds;
public:
    explicit Duration(int t_seconds) : seconds(t_seconds) { }
};

int main()
{
    Duration t(30); // This is fine, conversion is explicit
    t = 60; // Doesn't compile: implicit conversion no longer present for operator=
}

But what if I don't want to immediately break all calling code that's implicitly converting to Duration? What I would like to have is something like:

class Duration
{
    int seconds;
public:
    [[deprecated]]
    Duration(int t_seconds) : seconds(t_seconds) { }

    explicit Duration(int t_seconds) : seconds(t_seconds) { }
};

int main()
{
    Duration t(30); // Compiles, no warnings, uses explicit constructor
    t = 60; // Compiles but emits a deprecation warning because it uses implicit conversion
}

This would allow existing code to compile while identifying any places that currently rely on implicit conversion, so they can either be rewritten to use explicit conversion if it's intended or rewritten to have correct behavior if not.

However this is impossible because I can't overload Duration::Duration(int) with Duration::Duration(int).

Is there a way to achieve something like this effect short of "Make the conversion explicit, accept that calling code won't compile until you've written the appropriate changes"?

3
  • Would it be acceptable to turn on a compiler warning for implicit conversions? -Wconversion in gcc for example. Dec 2 '21 at 16:09
  • That doesn't actually appear to emit a warning for this situation. Something along those lines would probably suffice, though. Dec 2 '21 at 16:17
  • 1
    You might do it with conditional compilation, #ifdef REFACTOR explicit Duration(int) #else Duration(int). Then compile project by project and define REFACTOR (commandline) test the code. Once you've done all the projects remove the ifdef and all the defines (or the other way around start with a define on all projects and remove it one by one) Dec 2 '21 at 16:36
34

You can turn Duration(int t_seconds) into a template function that can accept an int and set it to deprecated.

#include<concepts>

class Duration {
  int seconds;
public:
  template<std::same_as<int> T>
  [[deprecated("uses implicit conversion")]]
  Duration(T t_seconds) : Duration(t_seconds) { }
  
  explicit Duration(int t_seconds) : seconds(t_seconds) { }
};

If you allow t = 0.6, just change the same_as to convertible_to.

Demo.

10
  • 3
    The SFINAE version doesn't seem that bad once this gave me the idea to try it. Great suggestion! Dec 2 '21 at 16:32
  • 2
    Downgrade to C++17 and C++11.
    – Marek R
    Dec 2 '21 at 16:42
  • 4
    @TheScore It's using it as a constraint. It's saying that std::same_as<T, int> must be satisfied for T to be a valid argument. Dec 2 '21 at 16:47
  • 2
    Note that this solution will break code like this: Duration minute() { return {60}; } The reason is that in copy-list-initialization, the overload resolution is done without considering explicitness, and then the program is ill-formed if an explicit constructor actually gets selected.
    – Brian Bi
    Dec 2 '21 at 17:12
  • 2
    Even just template<typename = void> [[deprecated]] Duration(int t_seconds) : Duraction(t_seconds) {} works, since an explicit initialization would always pick the non-template one
    – Artyer
    Dec 2 '21 at 17:47

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