8

Consider the following examples:

string_now = 'apple and avocado'
stringthen = string_now.swap('apple', 'avocado') # stringthen = 'avocado and apple'

and:

string_now = 'fffffeeeeeddffee'
stringthen = string_now.swap('fffff', 'eeeee') # stringthen = 'eeeeefffffddffee'

Approaches discussed in Swap character of string in Python do not work, as the mapping technique used there only takes one character into consideration. Python's builtin str.maketrans() also only supports one-character translations, as when I try to do multiple characters, it throws the following error:

enter image description here

A chain of replace() methods is not only far from ideal (since I have many replacements to do, chaining replaces would be a big chunk of code) but because of its sequential nature, it will not translate things perfectly as:

string_now = 'apple and avocado'
stringthen = string_now.replace('apple','avocado').replace('avocado','apple')

gives 'apple and apple' instead of 'avocado and apple'.

What's the best way to achieve this?

5
  • Is there a character that's guaranteed to not be in the string? For example \n? Dec 3, 2021 at 3:24
  • 4
    What should 'applemon'.swap('apple', 'lemon') produce? Dec 3, 2021 at 3:27
  • @KellyBundy this is an interesting case but for my cases there wont be any such case. where they overlap. It can either be 'applemon'.swap('apple', 'mon') or 'applemon'.swap('app', 'lemon'). But it sure is a very interesting case to look at.
    – Hamza
    Dec 3, 2021 at 3:54
  • There is no character tho which can never occur. Especially new line almost always occurs in multi-sentence lines
    – Hamza
    Dec 3, 2021 at 3:59
  • Old message on python-ideas :-) Dec 3, 2021 at 5:41

5 Answers 5

15

Given that we want to swap words x and y, and that we don't care about the situation where they overlap, we can:

  • split the string on occurrences of x
  • within each piece, replace y with x
  • join the pieces with y

Essentially, we use split points within the string as a temporary marker to avoid the problem with sequential replacements.

Thus:

def swap_words(s, x, y):
    return y.join(part.replace(y, x) for part in s.split(x))

Test it:

>>> swap_words('apples and avocados and avocados and apples', 'apples', 'avocados')
'avocados and apples and apples and avocados'
>>>
1
  • I think this is the best way to go about it as it doesn't assume any characters not appearing and avoid sequential replacement issues very elegantly
    – Hamza
    Dec 4, 2021 at 19:16
7

Two regex solutions and one for other people who do have a character that can't appear (there are over a million different possible characters, after all) and who don't dislike replace chains :-)

def swap_words_regex1(s, x, y):
    return re.sub(re.escape(x) + '|' + re.escape(y),
                  lambda m: (x if m[0] == y else y),
                  s)

def swap_words_regex2(s, x, y):
    return re.sub(f'({re.escape(x)})|{re.escape(y)}',
                  lambda m: x if m[1] is None else y,
                  s)

def swap_words_replaces(s, x, y):
    return s.replace(x, chr(0)).replace(y, x).replace(chr(0), y)

Some benchmark results:

 3.7 ms  1966 kB  swap_words_split
10.7 ms  2121 kB  swap_words_regex1
17.8 ms  2121 kB  swap_words_regex2
 1.3 ms   890 kB  swap_words_replaces

Full code (Try it online!):

from timeit import repeat
import re
import tracemalloc as tm

def swap_words_split(s, x, y):
    return y.join(part.replace(y, x) for part in s.split(x))

def swap_words_regex1(s, x, y):
    return re.sub(re.escape(x) + '|' + re.escape(y),
                  lambda m: (x if m[0] == y else y),
                  s)

def swap_words_regex2(s, x, y):
    return re.sub(f'({re.escape(x)})|{re.escape(y)}',
                  lambda m: x if m[1] is None else y,
                  s)

def swap_words_replaces(s, x, y):
    return s.replace(x, chr(0)).replace(y, x).replace(chr(0), y)

funcs = swap_words_split, swap_words_regex1, swap_words_regex2, swap_words_replaces

args = 'apples and avocados and bananas and oranges and ' * 10000, 'apples', 'avocados'

for _ in range(3):
    for func in funcs:
        t = min(repeat(lambda: func(*args), number=1))
        tm.start()
        func(*args)
        memory = tm.get_traced_memory()[1]
        tm.stop()
        print(f'{t * 1e3:4.1f} ms  {memory // 1000:4} kB  {func.__name__}')
    print()
4
  • Why would anyone not like replace chain? swap_words_replaces is the most elegant solution in my opinion. Dec 8, 2021 at 0:40
  • @FanchenBao You'll have to ask the OP, they wrote it's "far from ideal" but I don't know why. I think most elegant is the split+join solution, though. Dec 8, 2021 at 0:42
  • Yes it is elegant when I have one or two replacements to do. Since I have originally a large number of replacements to do, split-join approach works better as I can loop through them applying function for each operation however while chaining replaces it would be a big chunk of code
    – Hamza
    Dec 10, 2021 at 16:07
  • 1
    @Hamza Huh? Why couldn't you do the exact same looping as for the split-join approach? Dec 10, 2021 at 18:18
3

This solution uses str.format():

string_now = "apple and avocado"
stringthen = (  # "avocado and apple"
    string_now.replace("apple", "{apple}")
    .replace("avocado", "{avocado}")
    .format(apple="avocado", avocado="apple")
)

# Edit: as a function
def swap_words(s, x, y):
    return s.replace(x, "{" + x + "}")
            .replace(y, "{" + y + "}")
            .format(**{x: y, y: x})

It first adds curly brackets before and after keywords to turn them into placeholders. Then str.format() is used to replace the placeholders.

1
  • Kudos to @nikeros for making me think about this solution.
    – Stefan_EOX
    Dec 9, 2021 at 8:21
2

Why not just use a temp string which will never be in the origin string?

for example:

>>> a = 'apples and avocados and avocados and apples'
>>> b = a.replace('apples', '#IamYourFather#').replace('avocados', 'apples').replace('#IamYourFather#', 'avocados')
>>> print(b)
avocados and apples and apples and avocados

where #IamYourFather# is a string which will never be in the origin string.

2
  • Since I am not sure about what strings can NEVER occur, but still this is useful for such cases
    – Hamza
    Dec 9, 2021 at 16:16
  • @Hamaza md5(your name or birthday) is enough.
    – Kingname
    Dec 16, 2021 at 9:41
-2

I managed to make this function that does exactly what you want.

def swapwords(mystr, firstword, secondword):
    splitstr = mystr.split(" ")

    for i in range(len(splitstr)):
        if splitstr[i] == firstword:
            splitstr[i] = secondword
            i+=1
        if splitstr[i] == secondword:
            splitstr[i] = firstword
            i+=1

    newstr = " ".join(splitstr)

   return newstr

Basically, what this does is it takes in your string "Apples and Avacados", and splits it by spaces. Thus, each word gets indexed in an array splitstr[]. Using this, we can use a for loop to swap the words. The i+=1 is in order to ensure the words don't get swapped twice. Lastly, I join the string back using newstr= " ".join(splitstr) which joins the words separated by a space.

Running the following code gives us: Avacados and Apples.

2
  • You should use if..elif instead of two separate ifs. Then, you don't need i += 1. The for loop automatically takes the next element of the iterable in the next iteration. In fact, you could do i += 100 and it wouldn't make any difference. Dec 3, 2021 at 7:38
  • Also, your code breaks with swapwords("apples avocados and avocados", "apples", "avocados"). Dec 3, 2021 at 7:42

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