339

I'm not sure if this is Flask specific, but when I run an app in dev mode (http://localhost:5000), I cannot access it from other machines on the network (with http://[dev-host-ip]:5000). With Rails in dev mode, for example, it works fine. I couldn't find any docs regarding the Flask dev server configuration. Any idea what should be configured to enable this?

11 Answers 11

576

While this is possible, you should not use the Flask dev server in production. The Flask dev server is not designed to be particularly secure, stable, or efficient. See the docs on deploying for correct solutions.


Add a parameter to your app.run(). By default it runs on localhost, change it to app.run(host= '0.0.0.0') to run on your machines IP address.

Documented on the Flask site under "Externally Visible Server" on the Quickstart page:

Externally Visible Server

If you run the server you will notice that the server is only available from your own computer, not from any other in the network. This is the default because in debugging mode a user of the application can execute arbitrary Python code on your computer. If you have debug disabled or trust the users on your network, you can make the server publicly available.

Just change the call of the run() method to look like this:

app.run(host='0.0.0.0')

This tells your operating system to listen on a public IP.

  • 32
    To set to a specific ip app.run(host="192.168.1.7",port=5010) handy if your pc has a few ip's – lxx Jan 2 '15 at 3:29
  • 1
    how to access the flask script globally, hosting on my own server – pyd Jul 12 '18 at 10:37
  • This solution also works for Docker containers. This post describes the solution for these cases. – user7503126 Jan 4 at 12:32
  • for mac: I could not access my flask app at 0.0.0.0 (even though it was served there), except by targeting the domain specified in System Preferences > Sharing. The domain should be something like mymacname.local. – Nico Cernek Mar 4 at 21:56
  • To keep the app always alive -kind of mimic deployment- I used nohup. Found this the simplest form of deployment. – sjd Apr 11 at 8:06
88

If you use the flask executable to start your server, you can use flask run --host=0.0.0.0 to change the default from 127.0.0.1 and open it up to non local connections. The config and app.run methods that the other answers describe are probably better practice but this can be handy as well.

Externally Visible Server If you run the server you will notice that the server is only accessible from your own computer, not from any other in the network. This is the default because in debugging mode a user of the application can execute arbitrary Python code on your computer.

If you have the debugger disabled or trust the users on your network, you can make the server publicly available simply by adding --host=0.0.0.0 to the command line:

flask run --host=0.0.0.0 This tells your operating system to listen on all public IPs.

Reference: http://flask.pocoo.org/docs/0.11/quickstart/

  • 1
    I don't know if anyone else has experienced it, but I tried this method first as per the QuickStart docs, but for some odd reason the IP kept running at 127.0.0.1 (I setup my Flask executable properly, or so it seemed, wasn't sure what I was doing wrong). However, after adding app.run(host='0.0.0.0') as noted in another answer into my server file, I was able to access the page across networks. Anyone else have an issue like the one I've described or has any info on it? – twknab Apr 26 '17 at 11:56
  • 1
    For me, flask run --host=0.0.0.0 resolve the issue. I was able to access url -http://<ip address>:5000. First I checked what are the ports open on the machine using command - sudo firewall-cmd --zone=public --list-ports, then I came to know that port 5000 is not open. I opened this port using command - sudo firewall-cmd --zone=public --permanent --add-port=5000/tcp followed by sudo firewall-cmd --reload. then, run the flask app as - flask run --host=0.0.0.0 – Pintu Kumar Jul 24 '18 at 6:08
17

If your cool app has it's configuration loaded from an external file, like in the following example, then don't forget to update the corresponding config file with HOST="0.0.0.0"

cool.app.run(
    host=cool.app.config.get("HOST", "localhost"),
    port=cool.app.config.get("PORT", 9000)
)            
  • 1
    This is a nice way to also store the hostname and portnumber in the flask configuration. I was looking for exactly this solution. – compie Nov 1 '15 at 20:16
14

Add below lines to your project

if __name__ == '__main__':
    app.debug = True
    app.run(host = '0.0.0.0',port=5005)
  • I am getting OSError: [WinError 10013] An attempt was made to access a socket in a way forbidden by its access permissions – pyd Feb 2 '18 at 11:40
  • To ways to fix You need to run the python file with run as administrator and check any port is running on windows netstat -na|findstr 5005. – Jeevan Chaitanya Feb 19 '18 at 11:22
6

Check whether the particular port is open on the server to serve the client or not?

in Ubuntu or Linux distro

sudo ufw enable
sudo ufw allow 5000/tcp //allow the server to handle the request on port 5000

Configure the application to handle remote requests

app.run(host='0.0.0.0' , port=5000)


python3 app.py & #run application in background
3

Try this if the 0.0.0.0 method doesn't work

Boring Stuff

I personally battled a lot to get my app accessible to other devices(laptops and mobile phones) through a local-server. I tried the 0.0.0.0 method, but no luck. Then I tried changing the port, but it just didn't work. So, after trying a bunch of different combinations, I arrived to this one, and it solved my problem of deploying my app on a local-server.

Steps

  1. Get the local IPv4 address of your computer. This can be done by typing ipconfig on Windows and ifconfig on linux and Mac.

IPv4 (Windows)

Please note: The above step is to be performed on the machine you are serving the app on, and on not the machine on which you are accessing it. Also note, that the IPv4 address might change if you disconnect and reconnect to the network.

  1. Now, simply run the flask app with the acquired IPv4 address.

    flask run -h 192.168.X.X

    E.g. In my case (see the image), I ran it as:

    flask run -h 192.168.1.100

running the flask app

On my mobile device

screenshot from my mobile phone

Optional Stuff

If you are performing this procedure on Windows, and using Power Shell as the CLI, and you still aren't able to access the website, try a CTRL + C command in the shell that's running the app. Power Shell get frozen up sometimes and it needs a pinch to revive. Doing this might even terminate the server, but it sometimes does the trick.

That's it. Give a thumbs up if you found this helpful.😉

Some more optional stuff

I have created a short Powershell script that will get you your IP address whenever you need one:

$env:getIp = ipconfig
if ($env:getIp -match '(IPv4[\sa-zA-Z.]+:\s[0-9.]+)') {
    if ($matches[1] -match '([^a-z\s][\d]+[.\d]+)'){
        $ipv4 = $matches[1]
    }
}
echo $ipv4

Save it to a file with .ps1 extenstion (for PowerShell), and run it on before starting your app. You can save it in your project folder and run it as:

.\getIP.ps1; flask run -h $ipv4

Note: I saved the above shell code in getIP.ps1.

Cool.👌

2

I had the same problem, I use PyCharm as an editor and when I created the project, PyCharm created a Flask Server. What I did was create a server with Python in the following way;

Config Python Server PyCharm basically what I did was create a new server but flask if not python

I hope it helps you

  • Please don't just post an image - describe specifically what you do that resolves the problem. – CertainPerformance Jul 4 '18 at 2:22
  • Hey, of course if I'm already editing the post to improve the answer. – Juan E. Londoño T. Jul 4 '18 at 3:18
1

This answer is not solely related with flask, but should be applicable for all cannot connect service from another host issue.

  1. use netstat -ano | grep <port> to see if the address is 0.0.0.0 or ::. If it is 127.0.0.1 then it is only for the local requests.
  2. use tcpdump to see if any packet is missing. If it shows obvious imbalance, check routing rules by iptables.

Today I run my flask app as usual, but I noticed it cannot connect from other server. Then I run netstat -ano | grep <port>, and the local address is :: or 0.0.0.0 (I tried both, and I know 127.0.0.1 only allows connection from the local host). Then I used telnet host port, the result is like connect to .... This is very odd. Then I thought I would better check it with tcpdump -i any port <port> -w w.pcap. And I noticed it is all like this:

tcpdump result shows it there is only SYN packets from remote host

Then by checking iptables --list OUTPUT section, I could see several rules:

iptables list result

these rules forbid output tcp vital packets in handshaking. By deleting them, the problem is gone.

0

go to project path set FLASK_APP=ABC.py SET FLASK_ENV=development

flask run -h [yourIP] -p 8080 you will following o/p on CMD:- * Serving Flask app "expirement.py" (lazy loading) * Environment: development * Debug mode: on * Restarting with stat * Debugger is active! * Debugger PIN: 199-519-700 * Running on http://[yourIP]:8080/ (Press CTRL+C to quit)

0

Go to your project path on CMD(command Prompt) and execute the following command:-

set FLASK_APP=ABC.py

SET FLASK_ENV=development

flask run -h [yourIP] -p 8080

you will get following o/p on CMD:-

  • Serving Flask app "expirement.py" (lazy loading)
    • Environment: development
    • Debug mode: on
    • Restarting with stat
    • Debugger is active!
    • Debugger PIN: 199-519-700
    • Running on http://[yourIP]:8080/ (Press CTRL+C to quit)

Now you can access your flask app on another machine using http://[yourIP]:8080/ url

-1

Adding to @Shawn's answer, there is also a builtin configuration variable SERVER_NAME. we can set that to 0.0.0.0 in the config file which you specify in app.config.from_pyfile("config.py"). Also note that, this will override app.run host name.
Reference: http://flask.pocoo.org/docs/0.10/config/

  • 12
    If you follow this answer, you will put an entry for SERVER_NAME into your config file, conclude that it does not do what is supposed to do, forget about it, try the accepted answer and after an undefined amount of wasting your time you will find out that it works when you remove SERVER_NAME from your config file and then you will come back here and downvote this answer. – gnebehay Sep 14 '16 at 19:28

protected by Community May 13 '16 at 8:25

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