0

On Compiling follow programs using g++.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

cout<<"Before Main"<<endl;

int main()
{
cout<<"Within Main"<<endl;
}

Errors: expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before '<<' token. So may i know how to fixe this. What's the reason for getting erros.

3

You cannot execute statements outside a function.

  • 1
    A declaration is a statement. It is executed (e.g., function calls in initializer are executed). So, literally your statement is incorrect. But I see what you're trying to express. Unfortunately, the C++ standard does not, AFAIK, give us terms to talk about that! :-( – Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 11 '11 at 10:58
  • @Alf: Fair point. Let me make a note of that in my answer... – Oliver Charlesworth Aug 11 '11 at 10:59
2

You cannot put non-declaration statements at namespace scope.

However, an expression statement can be converted to a declaration, e.g.

bool const bah = (cout<<"Before Main"<<endl);

It is generally not a good idea, but perhaps worth knowing about?

Cheers & hth.,

  • Nice trick. Not though of that before. – Martin York Aug 11 '11 at 11:31
1

Such statements cannot be executed without putting it inside a function body. If you want something before main(), then encapsulate it in a global struct and define an object.

struct Print {
  Print() { cout<<"Before Main"<<endl; }
  ~Print() { cout<<"After Main"<<endl; }
} print;                        // <--- declare/define object

int main()
{
  cout<<"Within Main"<<endl;
}
  • +1 : Nice solution – nirmus Aug 11 '11 at 10:27
0

It is illegal, everything what will be execute must be inside main function. Of course you can write second function, and there put cout<<"Before Main"<<endl;, but main will be execute firstly. you can write :

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
void f() {
   cout<<"Before Main"<<endl;
}

int main()
{
   f();
   cout<<"Within Main"<<endl;
}

But main is first function which will be executed.

  • (a) It's void; (b) "everything [to be executed] must be inside [the] main function" is misleading; (c) "method" is not well-defined in C++, and even outside of C++ it usually means "member function", but it is not a member function here. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 11 '11 at 10:28

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