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Actually I started with Blazor and EF Core. At registering the DbContext i get stucked. The DbContext can be registerd with AddDbContext or with AddDbContextFactory. But what´s the difference?

builder.Services.AddDbContext<DataContext>(opt => opt.UseSqlServer("..."));
builder.Services.AddDbContextFactory<DataContext>(opt => opt.UseSqlServer("..."));

From docs i got following information:

AddDbContext:

Use this method when using dependency injection ...

Entity Framework Core does not support multiple parallel operations being run on the same Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.DbContext instance. This includes both parallel execution of async queries and any explicit concurrent use from multiple threads.

AddDbContextFactory:

Registering a factory is recommended for Blazor applications and other situations where the dependency injection scope is not aligned with the context lifetime...

For convenience, this method also registers the context type itself as a scoped service. This allows a context instance to be resolved from a dependency injection scope directly or created by the factory, as appropriate.

So can we globally say that if the program needs access to DbContext from different threads or at the same time it is necessary to register the context with AddDbContextFactory because when it gets created (e.g. in the controller) the liftime is set to scoped and so we every time get a new DbContext?

private readonly DataContext _dbContext;

public BlogController(IDbContextFactory<DataContext> dbFactory)
{
  // Will be created as SCOPED DbContext?
  _dbContext = dbFactory.CreateDbContext();
}

Also i found a similar Question here. And there the lifetime within AddDbContextand AddDbContextFactory is set during registration. Or I´m missing something.

So my question generally is:

  • When use AddDbContextFactory instead of AddDbContext?
  • What´s the lifetime difference from DbContext between DbContextFactory and AddDbContext?
  • Should I generally use DbContextFactory for Blazor projects?
  • Is there a memory overhead when DbContext is created within a scoped lifetime?
2
  • 2
    "Should I generally use DbContextFactory for Blazor projects?" -> "Registering a factory is recommended for Blazor applications..." -> why are you asking us when it is something that Microsoft already recommends? Dec 6, 2021 at 14:51
  • 1
    @CamiloTerevinto: because there still is a lot of confusion about the why as well as the how and when. Blazor is still new and comes in 2 very different flavours. Dec 6, 2021 at 15:41

2 Answers 2

6

Premise: We like the lifetime of a DbContext to be as short as possible.

For an HTTP server app we have the Scope of a Request/Response cycle. That is ideal, problem solved: inject a Scoped DbContext.

For a Blazor Server app, just as with WinForms and WPF, we don't have such convenient Scopes. So we must manage the DbContext more directly.

You can use the lifetime of a Form (Page), with IDisposable and/or OwningComponentBase but that lifetime is usually too long.

So the burden shifts to the Repositories (and/or Services): they must manage the DbContext on a per-method basis. That is where the DbContextFactory comes in: You can simply inject the Factory but each method looks like:

public async Task<T> GetSomething()
{
   using (var ctx = _factory.CreateContext())
   {
     ...
   }
}

A Blazor WebAssembly app will not use a DbContext directly, so the above mainly applies to Blazor Server.

3
  • so did I get right? without factory I do using var scope = _serviceProvider.CreateScope(); using var db = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<MyContext>(); with Factory I just using var db = _myContextFactory.CreateDbContextAsync();
    – LWS
    Feb 20, 2023 at 15:17
  • 1
    Yes, that is what it comjes down to. But the GetRequiredService path is not usually taken, this was a question about injecting a DbContext or a Factory. Feb 20, 2023 at 19:01
  • @HenkHolterman Thanks for pointing out a webassembly Blazor app won't be using DbContext (accessing a db) directly. It is generally safe to assume Server blazor only. Apr 2 at 17:49
2

When use AddDbContextFactory instead of AddDbContext?

In Blazor always use the DbContextFactory. But having said that, I'm sure someone will come up with an exception!

What´s the lifetime difference from DbContext between DbContextFactory and AddDbContext?

The DbContextFactory manages the lifecyle of it's DBContexts. Applying the "unit of work" principle and the lifecycle is that of the unit of work. If you add the context directly to the DI Container, such as with AddDbContext, then it lives for the lifetime of the DI Container.

Should I generally use DbContextFactory for Blazor projects?

Already answered above

Is there a memory overhead when DbContext is created within a scoped lifetime?

Of course. Memory is used by undisposed objects. A scoped DbContext lives for the lifetime of the DI Container. Dispose isn't called on objects within the container until the container itself is destroyed. It's why you never use Transient DbContexts. They aren't disposed until the session DI Container is destroyed.

2
  • 1
    Does a scoped DbContext lives for the lifetime of the DI Container or lifetime of a request (in case of ASP.NET Core)? My understanding is that a scoped dependency is created at the start of every request and disposed at the end of the request. Jan 11 at 12:52
  • It lives for the lifetime of the container, which in the context you are asked Ng about is the lifetime of the http request. In Blazor, which is the context this question refers to, the scoped container lives for the life of the SPA session. Jan 11 at 13:36

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