196

Is there a simple function for rounding UP a DateTime to the nearest 15 minutes?

E.g.

2011-08-11 16:59 becomes 2011-08-11 17:00

2011-08-11 17:00 stays as 2011-08-11 17:00

2011-08-11 17:01 becomes 2011-08-11 17:15

15 Answers 15

359
DateTime RoundUp(DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
{
    return new DateTime((dt.Ticks + d.Ticks - 1) / d.Ticks * d.Ticks, dt.Kind);
}

Example:

var dt1 = RoundUp(DateTime.Parse("2011-08-11 16:59"), TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15));
// dt1 == {11/08/2011 17:00:00}

var dt2 = RoundUp(DateTime.Parse("2011-08-11 17:00"), TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15));
// dt2 == {11/08/2011 17:00:00}

var dt3 = RoundUp(DateTime.Parse("2011-08-11 17:01"), TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15));
// dt3 == {11/08/2011 17:15:00}
14
  • 20
    This solution just made it into my utility library as an extension method.
    – JYelton
    Aug 11, 2011 at 16:42
  • 4
    Are you not losing information from the DateTime object with this method? Like the kind and the time zone, if there are set? Jul 14, 2014 at 12:37
  • 12
    @user14.. The ( + d.Ticks - 1) makes sure it will round up if necessary. The / and * are rounding. Example round 12 to the next 5: (12 + 5 - 1) = 16, 16 / 5 = 3 (because it is an integer datatype), 3 * 5 = 15. tada :) Aug 9, 2014 at 10:13
  • 15
    @dtb one small addition, otherwise it is probably a little bugged: you need to keep the datetime kind ;-) DateTime RoundUp(DateTime dt, TimeSpan d) { return new DateTime(((dt.Ticks + d.Ticks - 1) / d.Ticks) * d.Ticks, dt.Kind); } Apr 8, 2016 at 13:17
  • 3
    In case anyone need the round version of this answer: DateTime RoundDown(DateTime dt, TimeSpan d) { return new DateTime(dt.Ticks / d.Ticks * d.Ticks, dt.Kind); } May 31, 2020 at 16:51
133

Came up with a solution that doesn't involve multiplying and dividing long numbers.

public static DateTime RoundUp(this DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
{
    var modTicks = dt.Ticks % d.Ticks;
    var delta = modTicks != 0 ? d.Ticks - modTicks : 0;
    return new DateTime(dt.Ticks + delta, dt.Kind);
}

public static DateTime RoundDown(this DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
{
    var delta = dt.Ticks % d.Ticks;
    return new DateTime(dt.Ticks - delta, dt.Kind);
}

public static DateTime RoundToNearest(this DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
{
    var delta = dt.Ticks % d.Ticks;
    bool roundUp = delta > d.Ticks / 2;
    var offset = roundUp ? d.Ticks : 0;

    return new DateTime(dt.Ticks + offset - delta, dt.Kind);
}

Usage:

var date = new DateTime(2010, 02, 05, 10, 35, 25, 450); // 2010/02/05 10:35:25
var roundedUp = date.RoundUp(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15)); // 2010/02/05 10:45:00
var roundedDown = date.RoundDown(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15)); // 2010/02/05 10:30:00
var roundedToNearest = date.RoundToNearest(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15)); // 2010/02/05 10:30:00
9
  • 10
    I thought for sure that this would be faster than using multiplication and division, but my testing shows that it isn't. This over 10000000 iterations, the modulus method took ~610ms on my machine, while the mult/div method took ~500ms. I guess FPUs make the concerns of old a non-issue. Here is my test code: pastie.org/8610460
    – viggity
    Jan 7, 2014 at 16:45
  • 1
    Great use of extensions. Thanks! Jan 8, 2015 at 23:01
  • 1
    @Alovchin Thanks. I've updated the answer. I created this ideone with your code to show the difference: ideone.com/EVKFp5
    – redent84
    Mar 31, 2015 at 13:00
  • 1
    This is pretty old, but is the last %d.Ticks in RoundUp necessary? d.Ticks - (dt.Ticks % d.Ticks)) will necessarily be less than d.Ticks, so the answer should be the same correct? Mar 3, 2016 at 21:25
  • 3
    Just pointing out, modulus is a requires a division operation on the CPU. But I agree that it is more elegant that using the rouding down property of integer divisions.
    – Alex
    Feb 16, 2017 at 15:17
19

if you need to round to a nearest time interval (not up) then i suggest to use the following

    static DateTime RoundToNearestInterval(DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
    {
        int f=0;
        double m = (double)(dt.Ticks % d.Ticks) / d.Ticks;
        if (m >= 0.5)
            f=1;            
        return new DateTime(((dt.Ticks/ d.Ticks)+f) * d.Ticks);
    }
1
  • This answer doesn't round correctly. user1978424 has the only post that shows correctly how to round to the nearest interval below: (ironically down-voted because the question was abt rounding UP)
    – stitty
    Dec 11, 2014 at 22:25
11

I've seen a nuber of useful implementations, like the one from @dtb or @redent84. Since the performance difference is negligible, I stayed away from bit shifts and simply created readable code. I often use these extensions in my utility libraries.

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    public static DateTime RoundToTicks(this DateTime target, long ticks) => new DateTime((target.Ticks + ticks / 2) / ticks * ticks, target.Kind);
    public static DateTime RoundUpToTicks(this DateTime target, long ticks) => new DateTime((target.Ticks + ticks - 1) / ticks * ticks, target.Kind);
    public static DateTime RoundDownToTicks(this DateTime target, long ticks) => new DateTime(target.Ticks / ticks * ticks, target.Kind);

    public static DateTime Round(this DateTime target, TimeSpan round) => RoundToTicks(target, round.Ticks);
    public static DateTime RoundUp(this DateTime target, TimeSpan round) => RoundUpToTicks(target, round.Ticks);
    public static DateTime RoundDown(this DateTime target, TimeSpan round) => RoundDownToTicks(target, round.Ticks);

    public static DateTime RoundToMinutes(this DateTime target, int minutes = 1) => RoundToTicks(target, minutes * TimeSpan.TicksPerMinute);
    public static DateTime RoundUpToMinutes(this DateTime target, int minutes = 1) => RoundUpToTicks(target, minutes * TimeSpan.TicksPerMinute);
    public static DateTime RoundDownToMinutes(this DateTime target, int minutes = 1) => RoundDownToTicks(target, minutes * TimeSpan.TicksPerMinute);

    public static DateTime RoundToHours(this DateTime target, int hours = 1) => RoundToTicks(target, hours * TimeSpan.TicksPerHour);
    public static DateTime RoundUpToHours(this DateTime target, int hours = 1) => RoundUpToTicks(target, hours * TimeSpan.TicksPerHour);
    public static DateTime RoundDownToHours(this DateTime target, int hours = 1) => RoundDownToTicks(target, hours * TimeSpan.TicksPerHour);

    public static DateTime RoundToDays(this DateTime target, int days = 1) => RoundToTicks(target, days * TimeSpan.TicksPerDay);
    public static DateTime RoundUpToDays(this DateTime target, int days = 1) => RoundUpToTicks(target, days * TimeSpan.TicksPerDay);
    public static DateTime RoundDownToDays(this DateTime target, int days = 1) => RoundDownToTicks(target, days * TimeSpan.TicksPerDay);
}
8
void Main()
{
    var date1 = new DateTime(2011, 8, 11, 16, 59, 00);
    date1.Round15().Dump();

    var date2 = new DateTime(2011, 8, 11, 17, 00, 02);
    date2.Round15().Dump();

    var date3 = new DateTime(2011, 8, 11, 17, 01, 23);
    date3.Round15().Dump();

    var date4 = new DateTime(2011, 8, 11, 17, 00, 00);
    date4.Round15().Dump();
}

public static class Extentions
{
    public static DateTime Round15(this DateTime value)
    {   
        var ticksIn15Mins = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15).Ticks;

        return (value.Ticks % ticksIn15Mins == 0) ? value : new DateTime((value.Ticks / ticksIn15Mins + 1) * ticksIn15Mins);
    }
}

Results:

8/11/2011 5:00:00 PM
8/11/2011 5:15:00 PM
8/11/2011 5:15:00 PM
8/11/2011 5:00:00 PM
3
  • 3
    2011-08-11 17:00:01 gets truncated to 2011-08-11 17:00:00
    – JYelton
    Aug 11, 2011 at 16:49
  • 1
    @JYelton: Thanks for pointing out +1. I changed my code to accommodate that. Aug 11, 2011 at 17:03
  • Providing your code Linqpad format for easy verification is a great time saver. Very easy to use. Jul 24, 2017 at 13:23
6

Since I hate reinventing the wheel, I'd probably follow this algorithm to round a DateTime value to a specified increment of time (Timespan):

  • Convert the DateTime value to be rounded to a decimal floating-point value representing the whole and fractional number of TimeSpan units.
  • Round that to an integer, using Math.Round().
  • Scale back to ticks by multiplying the rounded integer by the number of ticks in the TimeSpan unit.
  • Instantiate a new DateTime value from the rounded number of ticks and return it to the caller.

Here's the code:

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{

    public static DateTime Round( this DateTime value , TimeSpan unit )
    {
        return Round( value , unit , default(MidpointRounding) ) ;
    }

    public static DateTime Round( this DateTime value , TimeSpan unit , MidpointRounding style )
    {
        if ( unit <= TimeSpan.Zero ) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("unit" , "value must be positive") ;

        Decimal  units        = (decimal) value.Ticks / (decimal) unit.Ticks ;
        Decimal  roundedUnits = Math.Round( units , style ) ;
        long     roundedTicks = (long) roundedUnits * unit.Ticks ;
        DateTime instance     = new DateTime( roundedTicks ) ;

        return instance ;
    }

}
1
  • This is nice code for rounding to the nearest DateTime, but I also want the ability to round up to a multiple of unit . Passing in MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero to Round does not have the desired effect. Do you have something else in mind by accepting a MidpointRounding argument?
    – HappyNomad
    Nov 26, 2013 at 8:19
4

My version

DateTime newDateTimeObject = oldDateTimeObject.AddMinutes(15 - oldDateTimeObject.Minute % 15);

As a method it would lock like this

public static DateTime GetNextQuarterHour(DateTime oldDateTimeObject)
{
    return oldDateTimeObject.AddMinutes(15 - oldDateTimeObject.Minute % 15);
}

and is called like that

DateTime thisIsNow = DateTime.Now;
DateTime nextQuarterHour = GetNextQuarterHour(thisIsNow);
1
  • 1
    this doesn't account for seconds Dec 23, 2019 at 4:29
1

Caution: the formula above is incorrect, i.e. the following:

DateTime RoundUp(DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
{
    return new DateTime(((dt.Ticks + d.Ticks - 1) / d.Ticks) * d.Ticks);
}

should be rewritten as:

DateTime RoundUp(DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
{
    return new DateTime(((dt.Ticks + d.Ticks/2) / d.Ticks) * d.Ticks);
}
1
  • 1
    I disagree. Since the integer division / d.Ticks rounds down to the nearest 15-min interval (let's calls these "blocks"), adding only a half block doesn't guarantee rounding up. Consider when you have 4.25 blocks. If you add 0.5 blocks, then test how many integer blocks you have, you still only have 4. Adding one tick less than a full block is the correct action. It ensures you always move up to the next block range (before rounding down), but prevents you from moving between exact blocks. (IE, if you added a full block to 4.0 blocks, 5.0 would round to 5, when you want 4. 4.99 will be 4.) Jan 15, 2014 at 8:37
1

A more verbose solution, that uses modulo and avoids unnecessary calculation.

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    public static DateTime RoundUp(this DateTime dt, TimeSpan ts)
    {
        return Round(dt, ts, true);
    }

    public static DateTime RoundDown(this DateTime dt, TimeSpan ts)
    {
        return Round(dt, ts, false);
    }

    private static DateTime Round(DateTime dt, TimeSpan ts, bool up)
    {
        var remainder = dt.Ticks % ts.Ticks;
        if (remainder == 0)
        {
            return dt;
        }

        long delta;
        if (up)
        {
            delta = ts.Ticks - remainder;
        }
        else
        {
            delta = -remainder;
        }

        return dt.AddTicks(delta);
    }
}
1

My DateTimeOffset version, based on Ramon's answer:

public static class DateExtensions
{
    public static DateTimeOffset RoundUp(this DateTimeOffset dt, TimeSpan d)
    {
        return new DateTimeOffset((dt.Ticks + d.Ticks - 1) / d.Ticks * d.Ticks, dt.Offset);
    }
}
0

Elegant?

dt.AddSeconds(900 - (x.Minute * 60 + x.Second) % 900)
1
  • 1
    A more correct version would be: x.AddSeconds(900 - (x.AddSeconds(-1).Minute * 60 + x.AddSeconds(-1).Second) % 900).AddSeconds(-1), that takes care of the "stays" condition.
    – Olaf
    Aug 11, 2011 at 16:35
0

This is a simple solution to round up to the nearest 1 minute. It preserves the TimeZone and Kind information of the DateTime. It can be modified to suit your own needs further (if you need to round to the nearest 5 minutes, etc).

DateTime dbNowExact = DateTime.Now;
DateTime dbNowRound1 = (dbNowExact.Millisecond == 0 ? dbNowExact : dbNowExact.AddMilliseconds(1000 - dbNowExact.Millisecond));
DateTime dbNowRound2 = (dbNowRound1.Second == 0 ? dbNowRound1 : dbNowRound1.AddSeconds(60 - dbNowRound1.Second));
DateTime dbNow = dbNowRound2;
0

You can use this method, it uses the specified date to ensure it maintains any of the globalization and datetime kind previously specified in the datetime object.

const long LNG_OneMinuteInTicks = 600000000;
/// <summary>
/// Round the datetime to the nearest minute
/// </summary>
/// <param name = "dateTime"></param>
/// <param name = "numberMinutes">The number minute use to round the time to</param>
/// <returns></returns>        
public static DateTime Round(DateTime dateTime, int numberMinutes = 1)
{
    long roundedMinutesInTicks = LNG_OneMinuteInTicks * numberMinutes;
    long remainderTicks = dateTime.Ticks % roundedMinutesInTicks;
    if (remainderTicks < roundedMinutesInTicks / 2)
    {
        // round down
        return dateTime.AddTicks(-remainderTicks);
    }

    // round up
    return dateTime.AddTicks(roundedMinutesInTicks - remainderTicks);
}

.Net Fiddle Test

If you want to use the TimeSpan to round, you can use this.

/// <summary>
/// Round the datetime
/// </summary>
/// <example>Round(dt, TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5)); => round the time to the nearest 5 minutes.</example>
/// <param name = "dateTime"></param>
/// <param name = "roundBy">The time use to round the time to</param>
/// <returns></returns>        
public static DateTime Round(DateTime dateTime, TimeSpan roundBy)
{            
    long remainderTicks = dateTime.Ticks % roundBy.Ticks;
    if (remainderTicks < roundBy.Ticks / 2)
    {
        // round down
        return dateTime.AddTicks(-remainderTicks);
    }

    // round up
    return dateTime.AddTicks(roundBy.Ticks - remainderTicks);
}

TimeSpan Fiddle

2
  • What happens if you want to round to the nearest 7th minute var d = new DateTime(2019, 04, 15, 9, 40, 0, 0); // should be 9:42 but none of these methods work like that? Apr 14, 2019 at 23:46
  • Edit looks like @soulflyman answer would produce the right result Apr 14, 2019 at 23:52
0

Solution from Ramon Smits with DateTime.MaxValue check:

DateTime RoundUp(DateTime dt, TimeSpan d) =>
    dt switch
    {
        var max when max.Equals(DateTime.MaxValue) => max,
        var v => new DateTime((v.Ticks + d.Ticks - 1) / d.Ticks * d.Ticks, v.Kind)
    };
-1

You can try this:

string[] parts = ((DateTime)date_time.ToString("HH:mm:ss").Split(':');
int hr = Convert.ToInt32(parts[0]);
int mn = Convert.ToInt32(parts[1]);
int sec2min = (int)Math.Round(Convert.ToDouble(parts[2]) / 60.0, 0);

string adjTime = string.Format("1900-01-01 {0:00}:{1:00}:00.000",
(mn + sec2min > 59 ? (hr + 1 > 23 ? 0 : hr + 1) : hr),
 mn + sec2min > 59 ? 60 - mn + sec2min : mn + sec2min);

Each part (hr, min) must be incremented and adjusted to proper value for overflow, like 59 min > 00 then add 1 to hr, if it is 23, hr becomes 00. Ex. 07:34:57 is rounded to 07:35, 09:59:45 is rounded to 10:00, 23:59:45 is rounded to 00:00, which is the following day's time.

1
  • Maybe mis-posted here, this is about rounding off the seconds portion of time to the minutes part.
    – Gil S
    Oct 6, 2020 at 16:13

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