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I'm frequently having deadlock when 2 transactions are doing:

  • entitymanager.find by id, no lock mode in particular
  • entitymanager.merge, no lock mode in particular

They are all under @Transactional and the default isolation is repeatable read, under mysql 5.7. The entity as id PK autoincrement as commonly used. No @Version if that matters...

What happens is this:

  1. txn A finds the row
  2. txn B finds the row
  3. txn A tries to update and thus escalate to an exclusive X lock but waits because there seems to be a shared (S) (read) lock on the row from txn B
  4. txn B tries to update and thus escalate to an exclusive X lock but it is after txn A, which is held back by B itself. Now this is detected as a deadlock so one of these txn will rollback.

The SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS (SEIS) reveals the last detected deadlock. It clearly says there were shared (S) locks.

This is my SEIS from prod (with some relabelling for privacy).

*** (1) TRANSACTION:
TRANSACTION 175274419, ACTIVE 0 sec starting index read
mysql tables in use 1, locked 1
LOCK WAIT 8 lock struct(s), heap size 1136, 3 row lock(s), undo log entries 2
MySQL thread id 627088, OS thread handle 22952098592512, query id 365172765 192.168.1.100 mydatabase updating

update thing set needs_checkup=0 where id=1129

*** (1) WAITING FOR THIS LOCK TO BE GRANTED:
RECORD LOCKS space id 361 page no 25 n bits 144 index PRIMARY of table `mydatabase`.`thing` trx id 175274419 lock_mode X locks rec but not gap waiting


*** (2) TRANSACTION:
TRANSACTION 175274420, ACTIVE 0 sec starting index read
mysql tables in use 1, locked 1
8 lock struct(s), heap size 1136, 3 row lock(s), undo log entries 2
MySQL thread id 627077, OS thread handle 22952240928512, query id 365172766 192.168.1.100 mydatabase updating

update thing set needs_checkup=0 where id=1129

*** (2) HOLDS THE LOCK(S):
RECORD LOCKS space id 361 page no 25 n bits 144 index PRIMARY of table `mydatabase`.`thing` trx id 175274420 lock mode S locks rec but not gap
 
*** (2) WAITING FOR THIS LOCK TO BE GRANTED:
RECORD LOCKS space id 361 page no 25 n bits 144 index PRIMARY of table `mydatabase`.`thing` trx id 175274420 lock_mode X locks rec but not gap waiting

*** WE ROLL BACK TRANSACTION (2)

What is surprising: I enabled the hibernate DEBUG level on org.hibernate.SQL to see the statements, and NONE of them show any "select ... lock in share mode" (nor select ... for update).

(I've gone the extra mile and packet-sniffed the mysql protocol over port 3306 with wireshark, and not a single hint of special locking mode, nor any session variable other than the usual "set session transaction read write" vs "... read only" from time to time, which has no effect on locking).

There is enough time between steps 1 and 3 obviously for txn B to sneak in. So I presume this shared lock is not a momentary effect of the update statement. We wouldn't get deadlocks that easily if that was the case. So I presume the shared lock comes from the "find".

The question is where is this configured? For all the docs I read, the default lock mode is LockMode.NONE.

If I write raw sql in 2 sessions, like below, (and using transaction read write mode, the default) I don't get the deadlock:

  1. txnA: select * from foo where id = 1;
  2. txnB: select * from foo where id = 1;
  3. txnA: update foo set x=x+1 where id = 1;
  4. txnB: update foo set x=x+1000 where id = 1;

but if I write this, then I get the same deadlock:

  1. txnA: select * from foo where id = 1 lock in share mode ;
  2. txnB: select * from foo where id = 1 lock in share mode ;
  3. txnA: update foo set x=x+1 where id = 1;
  4. txnB: update foo set x=x+1000 where id = 1;

Now, I don't want to use a X (or U) lock in the find, as mentioned in How do UPDATE locks prevent a common form of deadlock?.

I want to just lock less, as the raw SQL seems to allow. So again, the question is where is this configured? why is this shared lock requested? How does hibernate even get to that point if none of the sql statement I see in the sniffed packets even hint at those shared locks?

Thanks.

UPDATE:

In the last days, I've examined the possibility for an unseen statement in the same transactions prior to the updates above.

a) I do have a foreign key of some child table row inserted and pointing to the 'thing' row. The mysql doc does say something about shared locks on parent of FK. I tried and it didn't lock the parent for share. I still couldn't make the deadlock with those child inserts with "raw" instructions again. The child insert doesn't prevent a parent update (the parent "thing" table is the one having deadlocked statement, remember).

b) I also read on unique keys. They mention something about the statement (failing the unique constraint) taking a shared lock. I'm not clear on the steps to achieve that. While I'm still investigating that, I though I should mention it in case that lights up someone's mind...

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  • I don't know how to turn off the lock completely, but could you try out if when using optimistic locking it comes to a deadlock? entityManager.find(A.class, aid, LockModeType.OPTIMISTIC);
    – D-FENS
    Dec 10, 2021 at 0:38
  • 1
    We didn't design with version or timestamp columns in our entities/tables to be usable with optimistic locking. But that not involving server-side locks anymore than the default LockMode.NONE. So, I would like to rely on the jpa default which seems reasonable. I'm not quite ready to change all the thousands of transactions annotations.. that could be a huge mistake. The main reason for my S.O. questions is about the origin of the deadlock by jpa/hibernate but not raw statements that are similar, i.e. where is the shared lock coming from if nothing requested it. Dec 13, 2021 at 2:06

3 Answers 3

1

What is surprising: I enabled the hibernate DEBUG level on org.hibernate.SQL to see the statements, and NONE of them show any "select ... lock in share mode" (nor select ... for update). (...) The question is where is this configured? For all the docs I read, the default lock mode is LockMode.NONE.

The default locking behaviour is configured in your RDBMS, of course. It is also known as isolation level. You said yours was set to REPEATABLE READ, so both read locks and write locks are maintained till the end of transaction.

You seem to be confused about expecting no locks to be in use unless explicitly requested. This is not at all how it works. A SELECT statement always acquires a read lock, and an UPDATE statement always acquires a write lock. The million dollar question is when those locks get released, and that's what isolation levels control.

I want to just lock less

Well then, switch to a more lenient isolation level - READ COMMITED, if your use case doesn't care about non-repeatable reads.

Or, if there's little contention over DB rows and your update operations are relatively inexpensive, use optimistic locking, like @roccobaroccoSC suggested.

Or, if contention changes dynamically, try a hybrid approach: first, try optimistic locking n times, and if that fails, use pessimistic locking, with upfront calls to em.find(..., LockMode.PESSIMISTIC).

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  • Thanks for joining. The deadlock is witnessed by mysql, as the "show engine innodb status" shows. But it has to be initiated by hibernate since running the "raw" statements by hand (I called them raw per opposition to letting hibernate issue them) doesn't have the problem. Dec 13, 2021 at 1:37
  • I read on optimistic locking and it's about having a versioning/revision control mechanism and column in the table. It isn't something we planned for and it's not involving serverside lock any more than LockMode.NONE. I don't disagree that mysql has intrinsinc locking and it's influenced by the isolation level, but again, running the statements by hand with the same repeatable read isolation doesnt' cause the deadlock. I wanted to be sure and that why I sniffed the packets to make sure of it. I must have missed something though I looked pretty hard. Dec 13, 2021 at 1:44
  • Before filing the question, I was told about MVCC in innodb and the fact that without a "lock in share mode", there would not be any shared lock taken. I was skeptical because of the deadlocks in prod coming exclusively from hibernate. Then I tried the statement by hand and there was no shared lock, to my surprise. This is why I'm asking here now. I don't understand the origina of the shared lock from hibernate, knowing it's not in the statements I saw in the sniffed packets. Dec 13, 2021 at 2:10
  • Could you please clarify what you mean by 'running the "raw" statements by hand'? How are you verifying the fact that the same problem doesn't occur?
    – crizzis
    Dec 13, 2021 at 8:41
  • The exact interlaced steps (1,2,3,4) are in the original description. I open 2 distinct session (not just tabs mind you) with mysql workbench and type 1,3 in one and 2,4 in the other. Simple as it gets. I use the same table as the hibernate statements, just in case there is something hidden about indexes or triggers. But these steps (with lock in share mode) can lead to the deadlock with the primary key even on the simplest table without FK or triggers. Dec 13, 2021 at 11:24
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Your expectations about nonlocking reads are correct and documentation clearly states the same: https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/innodb-consistent-read.html, however I do believe that your analysis of the situation is incomplete - when you are performing tracing you might overlook some statements which look irrelevant for you, but from InnoDB perspective such statements might make sense, e.g. consider the following DB structure:

mysql> create table t(id int(11), v int(11));
Query OK, 0 rows affected, 2 warnings (0.02 sec)

mysql> insert into t(id,v) primary key, values(1,1),(2,2);
Query OK, 2 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from t;
+------+------+
| id   | v    |
+------+------+
|    1 |    1 |
|    2 |    2 |
+------+------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

and the next statement actually locks the whole table due to "missing" index on v column:

mysql> update t set v=4 where id<2;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)
Rows matched: 1  Changed: 1  Warnings: 0

mysql> show engine innodb status;
...
---TRANSACTION 3672, ACTIVE 2 sec
3 lock struct(s), heap size 1128, 2 row lock(s), undo log entries 1


which is counterintuitive for us, but described in documentation: https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/innodb-locks-set.html:

UPDATE ... WHERE ... sets an exclusive next-key lock on every record the search encounters. However, only an index record lock is required for statements that lock rows using a unique index to search for a unique row.

1
  • Thanks for joining. The statements invilved in the deadlock are select and updates, with the primary key, according to the SEIS (show engine innodb status). It's not a range or gap lock nor something like that. Dec 13, 2021 at 11:14
0

That's exactly the trouble I get : A select and an update causing deadlock.

I use SQL server 2019, which default isolation level is Read commited. What would be the less locking isolaltion level ? Read Uncommitted ?

https://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/isolation-levels-in-sql-server

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