4

I have a many-to-many relationship similar to the one described here. Notice my Association table includes an extra_data field..

class Association(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'association'
    left_id = Column(ForeignKey('left.id'), primary_key=True)
    right_id = Column(ForeignKey('right.id'), primary_key=True)
    extra_data = Column(String(50))

class Parent(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'left'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    children = relationship("Child", secondary="association", back_populates="parents")

class Child(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'right'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    parents = relationship("Parent", secondary="association", back_populates="children")

If I want to fetch a particular parent object with its children, I can do

db_parent = db.query(Parent).where(Parent.id == 1).first()
print(db_parent.children[0].id)  # works fine

BUT, the extra_data field is not included as an attribute of the children.

print(db_parent.children[0].extra_data)

AttributeError: 'Child' object has no attribute 'extra_data'

How can I write fetch the children of a parent such that extra_data is included as an attribute?


Fully Working Example

from sqlalchemy import create_engine, Column, Integer, String, ForeignKey
from sqlalchemy.orm import declarative_base, relationship, Session

# Make the engine
engine = create_engine("sqlite+pysqlite:///:memory:", future=True, echo=False)

# Make the DeclarativeMeta
Base = declarative_base()


class Association(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'association'
    left_id = Column(ForeignKey('left.id'), primary_key=True)
    right_id = Column(ForeignKey('right.id'), primary_key=True)
    extra_data = Column(String(50))

class Parent(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'left'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    children = relationship("Child", secondary="association", back_populates="parents")

class Child(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'right'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    parents = relationship("Parent", secondary="association", back_populates="children")


# Create the tables in the database
Base.metadata.create_all(engine)

# Test it
with Session(bind=engine) as session:

    # add parents
    p1 = Parent()
    session.add(p1)

    p2 = Parent()
    session.add(p2)

    session.commit()

    # add children
    c1 = Child()
    session.add(c1)

    c2 = Child()
    session.add(c2)

    session.commit()

    # map children to parents
    a1 = Association(left_id=p1.id, right_id=c1.id, extra_data='foo')
    a2 = Association(left_id=p1.id, right_id=c2.id, extra_data='bar')
    a3 = Association(left_id=p2.id, right_id=c2.id, extra_data='baz')

    session.add(a1)
    session.add(a2)
    session.add(a3)

    session.commit()


with Session(bind=engine) as session:
    db_parent = session.query(Parent).where(Parent.id == 1).first()
    print(db_parent.children[0].id)
    print(db_parent.children[0].extra_data)
5
  • Have you read the warning that follows the section of the docs that you linked to? It looks to me as if you need to remove the "secondary" and construct the relationships as shown shown in the docs. Dec 12, 2021 at 5:30
  • Hey, thanks. I read the warning but I though it was only pertaining to changes to the data. My issue with structuring the models as shown in the example is that, I then have to reference a child object with something like parent.children[0].child as opposed to simply parent.children[0]. This breaks a downstream Pydantic model that I initialize with the query result.
    – Ben
    Dec 12, 2021 at 5:44
  • So effectively you want parent.children to consist of Child instances, but you want to be able to access the extra_data attribute of the corresponding junction table row through the Child? Dec 12, 2021 at 7:17
  • @snakecharmerb yes that’s correct.
    – Ben
    Dec 12, 2021 at 7:49
  • 2
    Please read docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/14/orm/extensions/associationproxy.html, which might be the way to achieve your goal.
    – van
    Dec 15, 2021 at 6:32

3 Answers 3

2

What you are asking can't be done exactly how you want using SQLAlchemy. Indeed, items in Parent.children whould be instances of Child class. If your child class has an extra_data property loaded from an association table, to which of its parent would it refer?

What I'm trying to explain is that this implicit reference to "extra_data" that you would like to have in Child, only makes sense if the Child object is referenced from a parent object.

As an example, imagine the following scenario

session.add_all(
   Association(left=parent_a.id, right=child.id, extra_data="hello")
   Association(left=parent_b.id, right=child.id, extra_data="world")
)

Which parent metadata would you expect in child.extra_data ?

Moreover most of the time, if you need an object as association table, it means that this object makes sense by itself. And so that you should not try to hide it. Have a look at the following concrete example

class Account(Base):
    __tablename__ = "accounts"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    username = Column(String(10), nullable=False)
    groups = relationship("Membership", back_populates="account")


class Group(Base):
    __tablename__ = "groups"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String(10), nullable=False)
    members = relationship("Membership", back_populates="group")


class Membership(Base):
    """Membership is our association table here"""
    __tablename__ = "memberships"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

    account_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("accounts.id"))
    account = relationship("Account", back_populates="groups")

    group_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("groups.id"))
    group = relationship("Group", back_populates="members")

    # extra data embed in association table
    role = Column(String(10), nullable=False)

Base.metadata.create_all()

# create user "toto" that belongs to group "Funny people" with role "joker"
toto = Account(username="toto")
funny_people = Group(name="Funny people")
session.add(Membership(account=toto, group=funny_people, role="joker"))
session.commit()

Notice the difference between the two approaches. Here, Account.groups contains memberships and not directly Group objects. Then you can use it this way :

toto = session.query(Account).first()

toto.username
toto.groups[0].group.name
toto.groups[0].role

I know this is not exactly what you asked, but this is probably the closest you can have without introducing weird logic that will interfere with the proper functioning of your application

1

Thanks to @van for introducing me to SQLAlchemy's AssociationProxy. With AssociationProxy, I can almost get what I want, but it's still not ideal.

The idea here is to create three tables / classes as usual:

  1. left (Parent)
  2. right (Child)
  3. association (Association)

Then I give Parent a children relationship attribute. I also give Association a parent and a child relationship attribute.

Lastly, I set up association proxies inside Association so that it "carries" all the stuff its related child object has that I want. Here's a working example

from sqlalchemy import create_engine, Column, Integer, String, Float, ForeignKey
from sqlalchemy.orm import declarative_base, relationship, Session
from sqlalchemy.ext.associationproxy import association_proxy

# Make the engine
engine = create_engine("sqlite+pysqlite:///:memory:", future=True, echo=True)

# Make the DeclarativeMeta
Base = declarative_base()


class Association(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'association'

    left_id = Column(ForeignKey('left.id'), primary_key=True)
    right_id = Column(ForeignKey('right.id'), primary_key=True)
    parent = relationship("Parent", back_populates="children")
    child = relationship("Child")
    extra_data = Column(String(50))

    # Association proxies
    child_name = association_proxy("child", "name")
    child_weight = association_proxy("child", "weight")

class Parent(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'left'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    children = relationship("Association", back_populates="parent")

class Child(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'right'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String(100), nullable=False)
    weight = Column(Float, nullable=False)


# Create the tables in the database
Base.metadata.create_all(engine)

# Test it
with Session(bind=engine) as session:

    # add parents
    p1 = Parent()
    session.add(p1)

    p2 = Parent()
    session.add(p2)

    session.commit()

    # add children
    c1 = Child(name = "A", weight = 5)
    session.add(c1)

    c2 = Child(name = "B", weight = 3)
    session.add(c2)

    session.commit()

    # map children to parents
    a1 = Association(left_id=p1.id, right_id=c1.id, extra_data='foo')
    a2 = Association(left_id=p1.id, right_id=c2.id, extra_data='bar')
    a3 = Association(left_id=p2.id, right_id=c2.id, extra_data='baz')

    session.add(a1)
    session.add(a2)
    session.add(a3)

    session.commit()

Now if I fetch a parent instance, I can reference parent.children which returns a list of children with all the attributes I need.

with Session(bind=engine) as session:
    db_parent = session.query(Parent).where(Parent.id == 1).first()
    print(db_parent.children[0].extra_data)
    print(db_parent.children[0].child_name)
    print(db_parent.children[0].child_weight)

Technically though, parent.children is returning a list of Associations where each association is acquiring attributes from its related Child instance via my association proxies. A drawback to this is that I have to label these attributes child_name and child_weight as opposed to simply name and weight, otherwise if I decided to set up the reverse relationship, it won't be obvious that name and weight are attributes of the child and not the parent.

0

Another solution I came up with is to define a read-only property of Parent called children which merely executes the SQL query required to fetch the exact data I need.

from sqlalchemy import create_engine, Column, Integer, String, Float, ForeignKey
from sqlalchemy.orm import declarative_base, Session, object_session

# Make the engine
engine = create_engine("sqlite+pysqlite:///:memory:", future=True, echo=True)

# Make the DeclarativeMeta
Base = declarative_base()


class Association(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'association'

    left_id = Column(ForeignKey('left.id'), primary_key=True)
    right_id = Column(ForeignKey('right.id'), primary_key=True)
    extra_data = Column(String(50))

class Parent(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'left'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

    @property
    def children(self):
        s = """
            SELECT foo.* FROM (
                SELECT
                    right.*,
                    association.extra_data,
                    association.left_id
                FROM right INNER JOIN association ON right.id = association.right_id
            ) AS foo
            INNER JOIN left ON foo.left_id = left.id
            WHERE left.id = :leftid
            """
        result = object_session(self).execute(s, params={'leftid': self.id}).fetchall()
        return result


class Child(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'right'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String(100), nullable=False)
    weight = Column(Float, nullable=False)


# Create the tables in the database
Base.metadata.create_all(engine)

# Test it
with Session(bind=engine) as session:

    # add parents
    p1 = Parent()
    session.add(p1)

    p2 = Parent()
    session.add(p2)

    session.commit()

    # add children
    c1 = Child(name = "A", weight = 5)
    session.add(c1)

    c2 = Child(name = "B", weight = 3)
    session.add(c2)

    session.commit()

    # map children to parents
    a1 = Association(left_id=p1.id, right_id=c1.id, extra_data='foo')
    a2 = Association(left_id=p1.id, right_id=c2.id, extra_data='bar')
    a3 = Association(left_id=p2.id, right_id=c2.id, extra_data='baz')

    session.add(a1)
    session.add(a2)
    session.add(a3)

    session.commit()

Usage

with Session(bind=engine) as session:
    db_parent = session.query(Parent).where(Parent.id == 1).first()
    print(db_parent.children[0].extra_data)  # foo
    print(db_parent.children[0].name)        # A
    print(db_parent.children[0].weight)      # 5.0

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