560

A 64-bit double can represent integer +/- 253 exactly.

Given this fact, I choose to use a double type as a single type for all my types, since my largest integer is an unsigned 32-bit number.

But now I have to print these pseudo integers, but the problem is they are also mixed in with actual doubles.

So how do I print these doubles nicely in Java?

I have tried String.format("%f", value), which is close, except I get a lot of trailing zeros for small values.

Here's an example output of of %f

232.00000000
0.18000000000
1237875192.0
4.5800000000
0.00000000
1.23450000

What I want is:

232
0.18
1237875192
4.58
0
1.2345

Sure I can write a function to trim those zeros, but that's lot of performance loss due to string manipulation. Can I do better with other format code?


The answers by Tom E. and Jeremy S. are unacceptable as they both arbitrarily rounds to two decimal places. Please understand the problem before answering.


Please note that String.format(format, args...) is locale-dependent (see answers below).

5
  • If all you want are integers, why not use a long? You get more bang at 2^63-1, no awkward formatting, and better performance.
    – basszero
    Mar 31 '09 at 23:11
  • 16
    Because some values are actually doubles Mar 31 '09 at 23:12
  • 2
    Some cases where this problem occured was a bug fixed in JDK 7: stackoverflow.com/questions/7564525/… Oct 22 '11 at 8:18
  • Is it just me or is JavaScript 100% better at number to string conversion than Java?
    – Andy
    Jan 7 '19 at 9:54
  • System.out.println("YOUR STRING" + YOUR_DOUBLE_VARIABLE); Nov 29 '19 at 17:28

28 Answers 28

441
new DecimalFormat("#.##").format(1.199); //"1.2"

As pointed in the comments, this is not the right answer to the original question.
That said, it is a very useful way to format numbers without unnecessary trailing zeros.

16
  • 16
    An important note here is that 1.1 would properly be formatted as "1.1" without any trailing zeros. Apr 27 '11 at 7:10
  • 56
    And if you happen to want a specific number of trailing zeroes (e.g. if you are printing money amounts) then you can use '0' instead of '#' (i.e. new DecimalFormat("0.00").format(amount);) this isn't what OP wanted, but may be useful for reference.
    – TJ Ellis
    Oct 19 '11 at 19:31
  • 22
    Yes, as the original author of the question this is the WRONG answer. Funny how many up votes there are. The problem with this solution is it arbitrarily rounds to 2 decimal places. Dec 10 '12 at 18:00
  • 11
    @Mazyod because you can always pass in a floating pointing with more decimals than the format. That is writing code that will work most of the time but not cover all the edge cases. Feb 15 '13 at 17:15
  • 16
    @Pyrolistical - IMHO, there are many upvotes because, although this is the wrong solution for you, it is the right solution for 99%+ of those who find this Q&A: usually, the final few digits of a double are "noise", that clutter the output, interfering with readability. Hence the programmer determines how many digits are beneficial to the person reading the output, and specifies that many. A common situation is small math errors have accumulated, so a value might be 12.000000034, but would prefer rounding to 12, and displaying compactly as "12". And "12.340000056" => "12.34". Sep 14 '14 at 19:17
440

If the idea is to print integers stored as doubles as if they are integers, and otherwise print the doubles with the minimum necessary precision:

public static String fmt(double d)
{
    if(d == (long) d)
        return String.format("%d",(long)d);
    else
        return String.format("%s",d);
}

Produces:

232
0.18
1237875192
4.58
0
1.2345

And does not rely on string manipulation.

10
  • 10
    Agreed, this is a bad answer, do not use it. It fails to work with a double larger than the maximum int value. Even with long it would still fail for huge numbers. Further it will return a String in exponential form, e.g. "1.0E10", for large values, which is probably not what the asker wants. Use %f instead of %s in the second format string to fix that.
    – jlh
    Feb 3 '14 at 12:48
  • 29
    The OP stated explicitly that they did not want the output formatted using %f. The answer is specific to the situation described, and the desired output. The OP suggested their maximum value was a 32-bit unsigned int, which I took to mean that int was acceptable (unsigned not actually existing in Java, and no exemplar was problematic), but changing int to long is a trivial fix if the situation is different.
    – JasonD
    Feb 3 '14 at 14:26
  • 1
    Where in the question does it say it shouldn't do that?
    – JasonD
    Feb 18 '14 at 17:28
  • 11
    String.format("%s",d)??? Talk about unnecessary overhead. Use Double.toString(d). Same for the other: Long.toString((long)d).
    – Andreas
    Oct 14 '15 at 23:00
  • 19
    The problem is that %s doesn't work with Locales. In German, we use a "," instead of a "." in decimal numbers. While String.format(Locale.GERMAN, "%f", 1.5) returns "1,500000", String.format(Locale.GERMAN, "%s", 1.5) returns "1.5" – with a ".", which is false in German language. Is there a locale-dependent version of "%s" as well? Apr 19 '16 at 17:42
247
String.format("%.2f", value);
6
  • 15
    That's correct but always prints trailing zeros even if there is no fractional part. String.format("%.2f, 1.0005) prints 1.00 and not 1. Is there any format specifier for not to print fractional part if it does not exist? Feb 5 '10 at 20:45
  • 107
    Down voted since the question is asking to strip all trailing zeros and this answer will always leave two floating points regardless of being zero.
    – Zulaxia
    Apr 30 '11 at 9:48
  • The DecimalFormat was a nice trick -- although I ended up using this one for my situation (game level timer) as the trailing zeros looked better. Oct 8 '11 at 3:59
  • 2
    I think you can handle the trailing zeroes correctly by using g instead of f. Jan 4 '12 at 0:36
  • 4
    I used this solution in a production system with "%.5f", and it is really really bad, do not use it... because it printed this: 5.12E-4 instead of 0.000512
    – hamish
    Jul 8 '14 at 11:21
110

In short:

If you want to get rid of trailing zeros and locale problems, then you should use:

double myValue = 0.00000021d;

DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("0", DecimalFormatSymbols.getInstance(Locale.ENGLISH));
df.setMaximumFractionDigits(340); //340 = DecimalFormat.DOUBLE_FRACTION_DIGITS

System.out.println(df.format(myValue)); //output: 0.00000021

Explanation:

Why other answers did not suit me:

  • Double.toString() or System.out.println or FloatingDecimal.toJavaFormatString uses scientific notations if double is less than 10^-3 or greater than or equal to 10^7

     double myValue = 0.00000021d;
     String.format("%s", myvalue); //output: 2.1E-7
    
  • by using %f, the default decimal precision is 6, otherwise you can hardcode it, but it results in extra zeros added if you have fewer decimals. Example:

     double myValue = 0.00000021d;
     String.format("%.12f", myvalue); // Output: 0.000000210000
    
  • by using setMaximumFractionDigits(0); or %.0f you remove any decimal precision, which is fine for integers/longs but not for double

     double myValue = 0.00000021d;
     System.out.println(String.format("%.0f", myvalue)); // Output: 0
     DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("0");
     System.out.println(df.format(myValue)); // Output: 0
    
  • by using DecimalFormat, you are local dependent. In the French locale, the decimal separator is a comma, not a point:

     double myValue = 0.00000021d;
     DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("0");
     df.setMaximumFractionDigits(340);
     System.out.println(df.format(myvalue)); // Output: 0,00000021
    

    Using the ENGLISH locale makes sure you get a point for decimal separator, wherever your program will run.

Why using 340 then for setMaximumFractionDigits?

Two reasons:

  • setMaximumFractionDigits accepts an integer, but its implementation has a maximum digits allowed of DecimalFormat.DOUBLE_FRACTION_DIGITS which equals 340
  • Double.MIN_VALUE = 4.9E-324 so with 340 digits you are sure not to round your double and lose precision
10
  • This does not work for integers, e.g. "2" becomes "2."
    – kap
    Feb 3 '15 at 16:45
  • Thanks, I've fixed the answer by using the pattern 0 instead of #.
    – JBE
    Feb 9 '15 at 22:49
  • You are not using the constant DecimalFormat.DOUBLE_FRACTION_DIGITS but you are using the value 340, which you then provide a comment for to show that it equals DecimalFormat.DOUBLE_FRACTION_DIGITS. Why not just use the constant??? Oct 23 '15 at 14:47
  • 3
    Because this attribute is not public ... it is "package friendly"
    – JBE
    Oct 23 '15 at 17:27
  • 5
    Thanks! In fact, this answer is the only one that really matches all requirements mentioned in the question – it doesn't show unnecessary zeros, doesn't round the numbers and is locale-dependant. Great! Apr 20 '16 at 15:57
34

Use:

if (d % 1.0 != 0)
    return String.format("%s", d);
else
    return String.format("%.0f", d);

This should work with the extreme values supported by Double. It yields:

0.12
12
12.144252
0
2
  • 3
    I prefer this answer by which we don't need to do type conversion.
    – Jeff T.
    Oct 14 '15 at 8:44
  • Short explanation: "%s" basically calls d.toString() but it doesn't work with int or if d==null!
    – Neph
    Oct 24 '19 at 14:15
30

On my machine, the following function is roughly 7 times faster than the function provided by JasonD's answer, since it avoids String.format:

public static String prettyPrint(double d) {
  int i = (int) d;
  return d == i ? String.valueOf(i) : String.valueOf(d);
}
1
  • 2
    Hmm, this doesn't take locales into account, but neither does JasonD's.
    – TWiStErRob
    Jul 24 '16 at 10:00
24

My two cents:

if(n % 1 == 0) {
    return String.format(Locale.US, "%.0f", n));
} else {
    return String.format(Locale.US, "%.1f", n));
}
5
  • 3
    Or just return String.format(Locale.US, (n % 1 == 0 ? "%.0f" : "%.1f"), n);.
    – MC Emperor
    May 17 '17 at 11:27
  • 1
    fail when 23.00123 ==> 23.00
    – aswzen
    Dec 14 '18 at 3:17
  • 1
    what are you doing? it always rounds to 1 digit after the dot, it's not answer to the question. why some people cannot read?
    – user924
    Dec 3 '20 at 10:12
  • 1
    you wrong answer doesn't return 232 0.18 1237875192 4.58 0 1.2345
    – user924
    Dec 3 '20 at 10:13
  • Does it actually work? What is 'n'? A floating point number of some kind? An integer? Dec 8 '20 at 10:52
15

Naw, never mind. The performance loss due to string manipulation is zero.

And here's the code to trim the end after %f:

private static String trimTrailingZeros(String number) {
    if(!number.contains(".")) {
        return number;
    }

    return number.replaceAll("\\.?0*$", "");
}
11
  • 7
    I downvoted because your solution is not the best way to go. Have a look at String.format. You need to use the correct format type, float in this instance. Look at my above answer.
    – jjnguy
    Apr 1 '09 at 2:28
  • 9
    I voted up because I am having the same problem, and nobody here seems to understand the problem.
    – Obay
    Jan 19 '11 at 10:38
  • 1
    Downvoted as the DecimalFormat mentioned in Tom's post is exactly what you were looking for. It strips zeros quite effectively. Apr 27 '11 at 7:15
  • 5
    To the above, maybe he wants to trim the zeros WITHOUT rounding? P.S. @Pyrolistical, surely you can just use number.replaceAll(".?0*$", ""); (after contains(".") of course) Oct 6 '11 at 10:49
  • 1
    Ok, then how would you be able to achieve my objective with the DecimalFormat? Jan 18 '12 at 6:59
11

Use a DecimalFormat and setMinimumFractionDigits(0).

1
  • I would add setMaximumFractionDigits(2) and setGroupingUsed(false) (OP's doesn't mention it but from example it seems that its required). Also, a small test case doesn't hurt since its trivial in this case. Still, since I think it its the simplest solution, an upvote is an upvote :)
    – acrespo
    Jul 2 '19 at 13:57
9

This one will gets the job done nicely:

    public static String removeZero(double number) {
        DecimalFormat format = new DecimalFormat("#.###########");
        return format.format(number);
    }
0
9
float price = 4.30;
DecimalFormat format = new DecimalFormat("0.##"); // Choose the number of decimal places to work with in case they are different than zero and zero value will be removed
format.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.DOWN); // Choose your Rounding Mode
System.out.println(format.format(price));

This is the result of some tests:

4.30     => 4.3
4.39     => 4.39  // Choose format.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.UP) to get 4.4
4.000000 => 4
4        => 4
4
  • What about 1.23450000?
    – Alex78191
    Feb 20 '20 at 18:24
  • 1.23450000 => 1.23 Mar 2 '20 at 15:04
  • 1
    the only solution that satisfied me
    – BekaBot
    Sep 18 '20 at 10:11
  • DecimalFormat is not thread-safe. You have to be careful when using it.
    – yaboong
    Mar 15 at 16:38
9
if (d == Math.floor(d)) {
    return String.format("%.0f", d); //Format is: 0 places after decimal point
} else {
    return Double.toString(d);
}

More info: https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/data/numberformat.html

3
  • An explanation would be in order. Dec 8 '20 at 10:51
  • Nice answer, it doesn't need an explanation as it do it by itself. Jun 10 at 4:54
  • Explanation added. I hope this will deserve at least 2 more up-votes ;-)
    – fop6316
    Jun 16 at 19:24
7
new DecimalFormat("00.#").format(20.236)
//out =20.2

new DecimalFormat("00.#").format(2.236)
//out =02.2
  1. 0 for minimum number of digits
  2. Renders # digits
3
  • while this may provide a solution to the question, it is good practice to add a brief explanation for the community to benefit (and learn) from the answer
    – blurfus
    Jul 14 '17 at 17:14
  • this is not answer to that question. it always rounds to one number after a dot. Such a bad answer and offtopic
    – user924
    Dec 3 '20 at 10:01
  • you wrong answer doesn't return 232 0.18 1237875192 4.58 0 1.2345
    – user924
    Dec 3 '20 at 10:13
6

Please note that String.format(format, args...) is locale-dependent because it formats using the user's default locale, that is, probably with commas and even spaces inside like 123 456,789 or 123,456.789, which may be not exactly what you expect.

You may prefer to use String.format((Locale)null, format, args...).

For example,

    double f = 123456.789d;
    System.out.println(String.format(Locale.FRANCE,"%f",f));
    System.out.println(String.format(Locale.GERMANY,"%f",f));
    System.out.println(String.format(Locale.US,"%f",f));

prints

123456,789000
123456,789000
123456.789000

and this is what will String.format(format, args...) do in different countries.

EDIT Ok, since there has been a discussion about formalities:

    res += stripFpZeroes(String.format((Locale) null, (nDigits!=0 ? "%."+nDigits+"f" : "%f"), value));
    ...

protected static String stripFpZeroes(String fpnumber) {
    int n = fpnumber.indexOf('.');
    if (n == -1) {
        return fpnumber;
    }
    if (n < 2) {
        n = 2;
    }
    String s = fpnumber;
    while (s.length() > n && s.endsWith("0")) {
        s = s.substring(0, s.length()-1);
    }
    return s;
}
2
  • 1
    you should add this as a comment to the accepted answer Mar 13 '15 at 17:40
  • Comments do not allow the length or format of this addendum. Since it adds possibly useful information, I think it should be allowed as is rather than deleted. Mar 14 '15 at 3:01
5

I made a DoubleFormatter to efficiently convert a great numbers of double values to a nice/presentable string:

double horribleNumber = 3598945.141658554548844;
DoubleFormatter df = new DoubleFormatter(4, 6); // 4 = MaxInteger, 6 = MaxDecimal
String beautyDisplay = df.format(horribleNumber);
  • If the integer part of V has more than MaxInteger => display V in scientific format (1.2345E+30). Otherwise, display in normal format (124.45678).
  • the MaxDecimal decide numbers of decimal digits (trim with bankers' rounding)

Here the code:

import java.math.RoundingMode;
import java.text.DecimalFormat;
import java.text.DecimalFormatSymbols;
import java.text.NumberFormat;
import java.util.Locale;

import com.google.common.base.Preconditions;
import com.google.common.base.Strings;

/**
 * Convert a double to a beautiful String (US-local):
 *
 * double horribleNumber = 3598945.141658554548844;
 * DoubleFormatter df = new DoubleFormatter(4,6);
 * String beautyDisplay = df.format(horribleNumber);
 * String beautyLabel = df.formatHtml(horribleNumber);
 *
 * Manipulate 3 instances of NumberFormat to efficiently format a great number of double values.
 * (avoid to create an object NumberFormat each call of format()).
 *
 * 3 instances of NumberFormat will be reused to format a value v:
 *
 * if v < EXP_DOWN, uses nfBelow
 * if EXP_DOWN <= v <= EXP_UP, uses nfNormal
 * if EXP_UP < v, uses nfAbove
 *
 * nfBelow, nfNormal and nfAbove will be generated base on the precision_ parameter.
 *
 * @author: DUONG Phu-Hiep
 */
public class DoubleFormatter
{
    private static final double EXP_DOWN = 1.e-3;
    private double EXP_UP; // always = 10^maxInteger
    private int maxInteger_;
    private int maxFraction_;
    private NumberFormat nfBelow_;
    private NumberFormat nfNormal_;
    private NumberFormat nfAbove_;

    private enum NumberFormatKind {Below, Normal, Above}

    public DoubleFormatter(int maxInteger, int maxFraction){
        setPrecision(maxInteger, maxFraction);
    }

    public void setPrecision(int maxInteger, int maxFraction){
        Preconditions.checkArgument(maxFraction>=0);
        Preconditions.checkArgument(maxInteger>0 && maxInteger<17);

        if (maxFraction == maxFraction_ && maxInteger_ == maxInteger) {
            return;
        }

        maxFraction_ = maxFraction;
        maxInteger_ = maxInteger;
        EXP_UP =  Math.pow(10, maxInteger);
        nfBelow_ = createNumberFormat(NumberFormatKind.Below);
        nfNormal_ = createNumberFormat(NumberFormatKind.Normal);
        nfAbove_ = createNumberFormat(NumberFormatKind.Above);
    }

    private NumberFormat createNumberFormat(NumberFormatKind kind) {

        // If you do not use the Guava library, replace it with createSharp(precision);
        final String sharpByPrecision = Strings.repeat("#", maxFraction_);

        NumberFormat f = NumberFormat.getInstance(Locale.US);

        // Apply bankers' rounding:  this is the rounding mode that
        // statistically minimizes cumulative error when applied
        // repeatedly over a sequence of calculations
        f.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.HALF_EVEN);

        if (f instanceof DecimalFormat) {
            DecimalFormat df = (DecimalFormat) f;
            DecimalFormatSymbols dfs = df.getDecimalFormatSymbols();

            // Set group separator to space instead of comma

            //dfs.setGroupingSeparator(' ');

            // Set Exponent symbol to minus 'e' instead of 'E'
            if (kind == NumberFormatKind.Above) {
                dfs.setExponentSeparator("e+"); //force to display the positive sign in the exponent part
            } else {
                dfs.setExponentSeparator("e");
            }

            df.setDecimalFormatSymbols(dfs);

            // Use exponent format if v is outside of [EXP_DOWN,EXP_UP]

            if (kind == NumberFormatKind.Normal) {
                if (maxFraction_ == 0) {
                    df.applyPattern("#,##0");
                } else {
                    df.applyPattern("#,##0."+sharpByPrecision);
                }
            } else {
                if (maxFraction_ == 0) {
                    df.applyPattern("0E0");
                } else {
                    df.applyPattern("0."+sharpByPrecision+"E0");
                }
            }
        }
        return f;
    }

    public String format(double v) {
        if (Double.isNaN(v)) {
            return "-";
        }
        if (v==0) {
            return "0";
        }
        final double absv = Math.abs(v);

        if (absv<EXP_DOWN) {
            return nfBelow_.format(v);
        }

        if (absv>EXP_UP) {
            return nfAbove_.format(v);
        }

        return nfNormal_.format(v);
    }

    /**
     * Format and higlight the important part (integer part & exponent part)
     */
    public String formatHtml(double v) {
        if (Double.isNaN(v)) {
            return "-";
        }
        return htmlize(format(v));
    }

    /**
     * This is the base alogrithm: create a instance of NumberFormat for the value, then format it. It should
     * not be used to format a great numbers of value
     *
     * We will never use this methode, it is here only to understanding the Algo principal:
     *
     * format v to string. precision_ is numbers of digits after decimal.
     * if EXP_DOWN <= abs(v) <= EXP_UP, display the normal format: 124.45678
     * otherwise display scientist format with: 1.2345e+30
     *
     * pre-condition: precision >= 1
     */
    @Deprecated
    public String formatInefficient(double v) {

        // If you do not use Guava library, replace with createSharp(precision);
        final String sharpByPrecision = Strings.repeat("#", maxFraction_);

        final double absv = Math.abs(v);

        NumberFormat f = NumberFormat.getInstance(Locale.US);

        // Apply bankers' rounding:  this is the rounding mode that
        // statistically minimizes cumulative error when applied
        // repeatedly over a sequence of calculations
        f.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.HALF_EVEN);

        if (f instanceof DecimalFormat) {
            DecimalFormat df = (DecimalFormat) f;
            DecimalFormatSymbols dfs = df.getDecimalFormatSymbols();

            // Set group separator to space instead of comma

            dfs.setGroupingSeparator(' ');

            // Set Exponent symbol to minus 'e' instead of 'E'

            if (absv>EXP_UP) {
                dfs.setExponentSeparator("e+"); //force to display the positive sign in the exponent part
            } else {
                dfs.setExponentSeparator("e");
            }
            df.setDecimalFormatSymbols(dfs);

            //use exponent format if v is out side of [EXP_DOWN,EXP_UP]

            if (absv<EXP_DOWN || absv>EXP_UP) {
                df.applyPattern("0."+sharpByPrecision+"E0");
            } else {
                df.applyPattern("#,##0."+sharpByPrecision);
            }
        }
        return f.format(v);
    }

    /**
     * Convert "3.1416e+12" to "<b>3</b>.1416e<b>+12</b>"
     * It is a html format of a number which highlight the integer and exponent part
     */
    private static String htmlize(String s) {
        StringBuilder resu = new StringBuilder("<b>");
        int p1 = s.indexOf('.');

        if (p1>0) {
            resu.append(s.substring(0, p1));
            resu.append("</b>");
        } else {
            p1 = 0;
        }

        int p2 = s.lastIndexOf('e');
        if (p2>0) {
            resu.append(s.substring(p1, p2));
            resu.append("<b>");
            resu.append(s.substring(p2, s.length()));
            resu.append("</b>");
        } else {
            resu.append(s.substring(p1, s.length()));
            if (p1==0){
                resu.append("</b>");
            }
        }
        return resu.toString();
    }
}

Note: I used two functions from the Guava library. If you don't use Guava, code it yourself:

/**
 * Equivalent to Strings.repeat("#", n) of the Guava library:
 */
private static String createSharp(int n) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
        sb.append('#');
    }
    return sb.toString();
}
1
4
String s = String.valueof("your int variable");
while (g.endsWith("0") && g.contains(".")) {
    g = g.substring(0, g.length() - 1);
    if (g.endsWith("."))
    {
        g = g.substring(0, g.length() - 1);
    }
}
1
  • you should instead just search for the first non-zero-digit from the right and then use the subString ( and also verify that the string contains "." of course). this way, you won't come into creating so many temporary strings on the way. May 18 '13 at 22:25
4

You said you choose to store your numbers with the double type. I think this could be the root of the problem, because it forces you to store integers into doubles (and therefore losing the initial information about the value's nature). What about storing your numbers in instances of the Number class (superclass of both Double and Integer) and rely on polymorphism to determine the correct format of each number?

I know it may not be acceptable to refactor a whole part of your code due to that, but it could produce the desired output without extra code/casting/parsing.

Example:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class UseMixedNumbers {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Number> listNumbers = new ArrayList<Number>();

        listNumbers.add(232);
        listNumbers.add(0.18);
        listNumbers.add(1237875192);
        listNumbers.add(4.58);
        listNumbers.add(0);
        listNumbers.add(1.2345);

        for (Number number : listNumbers) {
            System.out.println(number);
        }
    }

}

Will produce the following output:

232
0.18
1237875192
4.58
0
1.2345
2
  • 1
    javascript made the same choice by the way :) Oct 29 '15 at 18:19
  • 1
    @Pyrolistical Can you explain a bit more your statement ? It's not quite clear for me... :)
    – Spotted
    Oct 30 '15 at 6:44
2

This is what I came up with:

  private static String format(final double dbl) {
    return dbl % 1 != 0 ? String.valueOf(dbl) : String.valueOf((int) dbl);
  }

It is a simple one-liner and only casts to int if it really needs to.

2
  • 1
    Repeating what Felix Edelmann said elsewhere: this will create a Locale-independent string, which may not always be appropriate for the user.
    – JJ Brown
    Mar 8 '19 at 18:11
  • fair point, for my use case this was not an issue, I'm not entirely sure right now but I think one could use String.format (with the wanted Locale) instead of valueOf
    – keisar
    May 9 '19 at 22:06
2

Format price with grouping, rounding, and no unnecessary zeroes (in double).

Rules:

  1. No zeroes at the end (2.0000 = 2; 1.0100000 = 1.01)
  2. Two digits maximum after a point (2.010 = 2.01; 0.20 = 0.2)
  3. Rounding after the 2nd digit after a point (1.994 = 1.99; 1.995 = 2; 1.006 = 1.01; 0.0006 -> 0)
  4. Returns 0 (null/-0 = 0)
  5. Adds $ (= $56/-$56)
  6. Grouping (101101.02 = $101,101.02)

More examples:

-99.985 = -$99.99

10 = $10

10.00 = $10

20.01000089 = $20.01

It is written in Kotlin as a fun extension of Double (because it is used in Android), but it can be converted to Java easily, because Java classes were used.

/**
 * 23.0 -> $23
 *
 * 23.1 -> $23.1
 *
 * 23.01 -> $23.01
 *
 * 23.99 -> $23.99
 *
 * 23.999 -> $24
 *
 * -0.0 -> $0
 *
 * -5.00 -> -$5
 *
 * -5.019 -> -$5.02
 */
fun Double?.formatUserAsSum(): String {
    return when {
        this == null || this == 0.0 -> "$0"
        this % 1 == 0.0 -> DecimalFormat("$#,##0;-$#,##0").format(this)
        else -> DecimalFormat("$#,##0.##;-$#,##0.##").format(this)
    }
}

How to use:

var yourDouble: Double? = -20.00
println(yourDouble.formatUserAsSum()) // will print -$20

yourDouble = null
println(yourDouble.formatUserAsSum()) // will print $0

About DecimalFormat: https://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/text/DecimalFormat.html

2

For Kotlin you can use an extension like:

fun Double.toPrettyString() =
    if(this - this.toLong() == 0.0)
        String.format("%d", this.toLong())
    else
        String.format("%s", this)
1

Here's another answer that has an option to append decimal ONLY IF decimal was not zero.

   /**
     * Example: (isDecimalRequired = true)
     * d = 12345
     * returns 12,345.00
     *
     * d = 12345.12345
     * returns 12,345.12
     *
     * ==================================================
     * Example: (isDecimalRequired = false)
     * d = 12345
     * returns 12,345 (notice that there's no decimal since it's zero)
     *
     * d = 12345.12345
     * returns 12,345.12
     *
     * @param d float to format
     * @param zeroCount number decimal places
     * @param isDecimalRequired true if it will put decimal even zero,
     * false will remove the last decimal(s) if zero.
     */
    fun formatDecimal(d: Float? = 0f, zeroCount: Int, isDecimalRequired: Boolean = true): String {
        val zeros = StringBuilder()

        for (i in 0 until zeroCount) {
            zeros.append("0")
        }

        var pattern = "#,##0"

        if (zeros.isNotEmpty()) {
            pattern += ".$zeros"
        }

        val numberFormat = DecimalFormat(pattern)

        var formattedNumber = if (d != null) numberFormat.format(d) else "0"

        if (!isDecimalRequired) {
            for (i in formattedNumber.length downTo formattedNumber.length - zeroCount) {
                val number = formattedNumber[i - 1]

                if (number == '0' || number == '.') {
                    formattedNumber = formattedNumber.substring(0, formattedNumber.length - 1)
                } else {
                    break
                }
            }
        }

        return formattedNumber
    }
0

Here are two ways to achieve it. First, the shorter (and probably better) way:

public static String formatFloatToString(final float f)
{
  final int i = (int)f;
  if(f == i)
    return Integer.toString(i);
  return Float.toString(f);
}

And here's the longer and probably worse way:

public static String formatFloatToString(final float f)
{
  final String s = Float.toString(f);
  int dotPos = -1;
  for(int i=0; i<s.length(); ++i)
    if(s.charAt(i) == '.')
    {
      dotPos = i;
      break;
    }

  if(dotPos == -1)
    return s;

  int end = dotPos;
  for(int i = dotPos + 1; i<s.length(); ++i)
  {
    final char c = s.charAt(i);
    if(c != '0')
      end = i + 1;
  }
  final String result = s.substring(0, end);
  return result;
}
11
  • 1
    sometimes, when you make things more simple, the code behind is more complex and less optimized... but yes, you can use plenty of built in API functions... May 21 '13 at 22:16
  • 1
    You should start with simple and once you have determined you have a performance problem, then and only then should you optimize. Code is for the human to read again and again. Making it run fast is secondary. By not using the standard API whenever possible you are more likely to introduce bugs and only makes it more difficult to change in the future. May 21 '13 at 23:02
  • 3
    I would argue code you write like that is NOT going to be any faster. The JVM is very smart and you don't actually know how fast or slow something is until you profile it. Performance problems can be detected and fixed when it becomes a problem. You should not prematurely optimize for it. Write code for people to read, not for how you imagine the machine is going to run it. Once it becomes a performance problem, rewrite code with a profiler. May 22 '13 at 17:41
  • 2
    Somebody else edited the answer to improve the code formatting. I was reviewing several dozen edits for approval and was going to approve their edit here, but the edits were inconsistent so I fixed them. I also improved the grammar of the text snippets. Aug 21 '15 at 15:24
  • 1
    I don't understand. If you said the formatting didn't matter, why did you spend the time to change it back?
    – OrhanC1
    Jun 27 '16 at 16:54
0
public static String fmt(double d) {
    String val = Double.toString(d);
    String[] valArray = val.split("\\.");
    long valLong = 0;
    if(valArray.length == 2) {
        valLong = Long.parseLong(valArray[1]);
    }
     if (valLong == 0)
        return String.format("%d", (long) d);
    else
        return String.format("%s", d);
}

I had to use this because d == (long)d was giving me violation in a SonarQube report.

0

I am using this for formatting numbers without trailing zeroes in our JSF application. The original built-in formatters required you to specify max numbers of fractional digits which could be useful here also in case you have too many fractional digits.

/**
 * Formats the given Number as with as many fractional digits as precision
 * available.<br>
 * This is a convenient method in case all fractional digits shall be
 * rendered and no custom format / pattern needs to be provided.<br>
 * <br>
 * This serves as a workaround for {@link NumberFormat#getNumberInstance()}
 * which by default only renders up to three fractional digits.
 *
 * @param number
 * @param locale
 * @param groupingUsed <code>true</code> if grouping shall be used
 *
 * @return
 */
public static String formatNumberFraction(final Number number, final Locale locale, final boolean groupingUsed)
{
    if (number == null)
        return null;

    final BigDecimal bDNumber = MathUtils.getBigDecimal(number);

    final NumberFormat numberFormat = NumberFormat.getNumberInstance(locale);
    numberFormat.setMaximumFractionDigits(Math.max(0, bDNumber.scale()));
    numberFormat.setGroupingUsed(groupingUsed);

    // Convert back for locale percent formatter
    return numberFormat.format(bDNumber);
}

/**
 * Formats the given Number as percent with as many fractional digits as
 * precision available.<br>
 * This is a convenient method in case all fractional digits shall be
 * rendered and no custom format / pattern needs to be provided.<br>
 * <br>
 * This serves as a workaround for {@link NumberFormat#getPercentInstance()}
 * which does not renders fractional digits.
 *
 * @param number Number in range of [0-1]
 * @param locale
 *
 * @return
 */
public static String formatPercentFraction(final Number number, final Locale locale)
{
    if (number == null)
        return null;

    final BigDecimal bDNumber = MathUtils.getBigDecimal(number).multiply(new BigDecimal(100));

    final NumberFormat percentScaleFormat = NumberFormat.getPercentInstance(locale);
    percentScaleFormat.setMaximumFractionDigits(Math.max(0, bDNumber.scale() - 2));

    final BigDecimal bDNumberPercent = bDNumber.multiply(new BigDecimal(0.01));

    // Convert back for locale percent formatter
    final String strPercent = percentScaleFormat.format(bDNumberPercent);

    return strPercent;
}
0

A simple solution with locale in mind:

double d = 123.45;
NumberFormat numberFormat = NumberFormat.getInstance(Locale.GERMANY);
System.out.println(numberFormat.format(d));

Since comma is used as decimal separator in Germany, the above will print:

123,45

-1

Here is an answer that actually works (combination of different answers here)

public static String removeTrailingZeros(double f)
{
    if(f == (int)f) {
        return String.format("%d", (int)f);
    }
    return String.format("%f", f).replaceAll("0*$", "");
}
3
  • 1
    you did not replace the POINT, for example, "100.0" will be convert to "100." Nov 15 '13 at 3:05
  • if(f == (int)f) takes care of that. Dec 3 '13 at 2:38
  • 2
    Fails on f = 9999999999.00 Jan 4 '14 at 23:10
-4

The best way to do this is as below:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String args[]){
        System.out.println(String.format("%s something", new Double(3.456)));
        System.out.println(String.format("%s something", new Double(3.456234523452)));
        System.out.println(String.format("%s something", new Double(3.45)));
        System.out.println(String.format("%s something", new Double(3)));
    }
}

Output:

3.456 something
3.456234523452 something
3.45 something
3.0 something

The only issue is the last one where .0 doesn't get removed. But if you are able to live with that then this works best. %.2f will round it to the last two decimal digits. So will DecimalFormat. If you need all the decimal places, but not the trailing zeros then this works best.

3
  • 3
    DecimalFormat with format of "#.##" will not keep extra 0 if they are not needed: System.out.println(new java.text.DecimalFormat("#.##").format(1.0005)); will print 1
    – Aleks G
    May 9 '12 at 9:19
  • thats my point. What if you want the 0.0005 displayed if there is any. You will be rounding it 2 decimal digits.
    – sethu
    May 9 '12 at 11:33
  • The OP is asking how to print integer values stored in doubles :)
    – Aleks G
    May 9 '12 at 11:35
-10
String s = "1.210000";
while (s.endsWith("0")){
    s = (s.substring(0, s.length() - 1));
}

This will make the string to drop the tailing 0-s.

2
  • 1
    This is a good solution to the question, if they were only interested in trailing zeroes being dropped, how would you change your code to also trim a trailing decimal point? i.e. "1."
    – bakoyaro
    Oct 26 '11 at 16:32
  • 34
    Be careful, your solution will convert 1000 into 1, which is wrong.
    – Aleks G
    May 9 '12 at 9:16

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