1

I learned what the different between post-increment and pre-increment was, but still surprised by the below code:

let array = [1];
array = [array[0]++];
console.log(array);

I expected array[0] would be returned on the right hand first, then array would be assigned as [1]. After that, array[0]++ would be executed, and array should be [2].

Thanks for any explanation.

1
  • 4
    You overwrite array. Assignments are right to left - the right side resolves to [1] and that's what you assign to array
    – VLAZ
    Commented Dec 14, 2021 at 7:35

4 Answers 4

1
let array = [1]; 

let item = array[0]++; // item = 1

array = [item]; // array = [1]
0

As we see in C++

int  x= 2;
cout<< x++ ;

Just like in C++, the control first sets/prints the value and then increment it. It is the same case here.

let array = [1];
array = [array[0]++];
console.log(array);

However, You can use the following below code to see difference

let array = [1];      //array[0]=1
array = [++array[0]]; //array[0]=2
console.log(array);

0

Pre-increment means that the variable is incremented before the expression is set or evaluated. Post-increment means that the expression is set or evaluated and then the variable is changed. It is a two-step process. Here is your example:

// post increment
arr = [1];
console.log('A:', [arr[0]++] ); // the same like: y = x;
// 1

// pre increment
arr = [1];
console.log('B', [++arr[0]]); // the same like: x++; y = x;
// 2

// and now to understand what the diffenrence

arr = [1];
// post increment
console.log('C1', [arr[0]++] ); 
// pre increment
console.log('C2', [++arr[0]] );

-1

Simple definition for this issue

let array = [1];
array = [array[0]++];
console.log(array);

The above statement is a post increment operator. So the value will be incremented only once the operation is completed. Post increment make use of use and update methedology. Your value will be used frst and will be updated only after that. You updated array[0] but overwrote array with [array[0]++]. So its make use of current value for assigining to array Since you overwrote array, ther is no significance for update operator.

The post increment operator increments and returns the value before incrementing.

So the value for array is overwritten with [array[0]++]. This will first assign [array[0]++] to your array and increment array[0]. So [1] will be assigned to array.

11
  • "This will first assign [array[0]++] to your array and increment array[0]" no, that's not how it works. The right-hand expression is evaluated before the assignment happens.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Dec 14, 2021 at 8:02
  • 1
    No, it happens after the retrieval of the value. Post increment does retrieve -> increment, pre-increment will do increment -> retrieve. In both cases it's an atomic operation. If it worked after the line was finished, then x = 0; y = x++ + x++; would assign 0 to y. However, the result is 1 because the first x++ does increment the value so the second x++ would return 1 and increment a second time.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Dec 14, 2021 at 8:05
  • Yes @VLAZ same im telling. Post increment does retrieve -> increment operation. So at the time of execution of array = [array[0]++];, the value for the right hand side is 1. This will be incremented only after that statement execution. To be more specificc, its a use and update mechanism. But the user overwrote array with [array[0]++] So the update opratation has anything to be done here.
    – Nitheesh
    Commented Dec 14, 2021 at 8:15
  • You said that the assignment happens before the increment. That's not the order of operations - it's increment first, and only afterwards is the value assigned to array.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Dec 14, 2021 at 8:16
  • It not the assignment, its the usage of the variable. if its it's increment first, and only afterwards is the value assigned to array then why the value is not updated in array?
    – Nitheesh
    Commented Dec 14, 2021 at 9:04

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