122

What is the syntax for setting multiple file-extensions as searchPattern on Directory.GetFiles()? For example filtering out files with .aspx and .ascx extensions.

// TODO: Set the string 'searchPattern' to only get files with
// the extension '.aspx' and '.ascx'.
var filteredFiles = Directory.GetFiles(path, searchPattern);

Update: LINQ is not an option, it has to be a searchPattern passed into GetFiles, as specified in the question.

19 Answers 19

37

I believe there is no "out of the box" solution, that's a limitation of the Directory.GetFiles method.

It's fairly easy to write your own method though, here is an example.

The code could be:

/// <summary>
/// Returns file names from given folder that comply to given filters
/// </summary>
/// <param name="SourceFolder">Folder with files to retrieve</param>
/// <param name="Filter">Multiple file filters separated by | character</param>
/// <param name="searchOption">File.IO.SearchOption, 
/// could be AllDirectories or TopDirectoryOnly</param>
/// <returns>Array of FileInfo objects that presents collection of file names that 
/// meet given filter</returns>
public string[] getFiles(string SourceFolder, string Filter, 
 System.IO.SearchOption searchOption)
{
 // ArrayList will hold all file names
ArrayList alFiles = new ArrayList();

 // Create an array of filter string
 string[] MultipleFilters = Filter.Split('|');

 // for each filter find mathing file names
 foreach (string FileFilter in MultipleFilters)
 {
  // add found file names to array list
  alFiles.AddRange(Directory.GetFiles(SourceFolder, FileFilter, searchOption));
 }

 // returns string array of relevant file names
 return (string[])alFiles.ToArray(typeof(string));
}
  • 6
    This is a very insufficient way of doing it, since you will loop entire directory for each filter. Instead you should check for each file if it has the filter then add to do the list. You can use the answer explained in this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/3754118/… – ot0 Dec 24 '15 at 11:09
182
var filteredFiles = Directory
    .GetFiles(path, "*.*")
    .Where(file => file.ToLower().EndsWith("aspx") || file.ToLower().EndsWith("ascx"))
    .ToList();

Edit 2014-07-23

You can do this in .NET 4.5 for a faster enumeration:

var filteredFiles = Directory
    .EnumerateFiles(path) //<--- .NET 4.5
    .Where(file => file.ToLower().EndsWith("aspx") || file.ToLower().EndsWith("ascx"))
    .ToList();

Directory.EnumerateFiles in MSDN

  • 5
    @Mario Vernari: GetFiles returns string[]. – jgauffin Aug 12 '11 at 12:02
  • 3
    You must remove the * from the EndsWith() argument, it doesn't do wildcard matches. – Hans Passant Aug 12 '11 at 12:22
  • 3
    if compare extensions of file it will return exact match like '.Where(file => new FileInfo(file).Extension.Equals(".aspx") || new FileInfo(file).Extension.Equals(".ascx"))' – Damith Aug 12 '11 at 12:37
  • 3
    Don't forget the new .NET4 Directory.EnumerateFiles for a performance boost... stackoverflow.com/questions/5669617/… – drzaus Sep 18 '13 at 19:27
  • 6
    And you can always use file.EndsWith("...", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase); rather than ToLower – drzaus Sep 18 '13 at 19:59
30

GetFiles can only match a single pattern, but you can use Linq to invoke GetFiles with multiple patterns:

FileInfo[] fi = new string[]{"*.txt","*.doc"}
    .SelectMany(i => di.GetFiles(i, SearchOption.AllDirectories))
    .ToArray();

See comments section here: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/aspnet/NET_DirectoryInfo.aspx

  • 6
    why the Distinct? They shouldn't collide, right? – drzaus Sep 18 '13 at 20:02
  • 2
    They'll collide if the patterns overlap. E.g., new string[]{"*.txt","filename.*"}. However, the call to Distinct doesn't actually resolve this problem, since FileInfo objects compare using reference equality, not semantic equality. It could be fixed by either removing the Distinct or passing it an IEqualityComparer<FileInfo>. Edited to do the former. – Brian Jul 9 '15 at 16:20
  • I would think that SelectMany will iterate over the same file structure again (and again) so it might be sub-optimal in terms of performance. – Dejan Mar 19 at 10:20
17

I like this method, because it is readable and avoids multiple iterations of the directory:

var allowedExtensions = new [] {".doc", ".docx", ".pdf", ".ppt", ".pptx", ".xls", ".xslx"}; 
var files = Directory
    .GetFiles(folder)
    .Where(file => allowedExtensions.Any(file.ToLower().EndsWith))
    .ToList();
  • 1
    I like this a lot better because I don't have to parse my extension array and add it to regex or other manual work. Thanks! – Ian Newland Oct 2 '15 at 16:34
  • if allowed extensions was an IDictionary ... – Jodrell Jun 12 '18 at 6:56
  • @Jodrell, or simply a HashSet<string> – Jodrell Sep 10 '18 at 14:40
14
var filteredFiles = Directory
    .EnumerateFiles(path, "*.*") // .NET4 better than `GetFiles`
    .Where(
        // ignorecase faster than tolower...
        file => file.ToLower().EndsWith("aspx")
        || file.EndsWith("ascx", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
    .ToList();

Or, it may be faster to split and merge your globs (at least it looks cleaner):

"*.ext1;*.ext2".Split(';')
    .SelectMany(g => Directory.EnumerateFiles(path, g))
    .ToList();
14

I fear you will have to do somthing like this, I mutated the regex from here.

var searchPattern = new Regex(
    @"$(?<=\.(aspx|ascx))", 
    RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
var files = Directory.EnumerateFiles(path)
    .Where(f => searchPattern.IsMatch(f))
    .ToList();
  • this seems to be a nice approach, the missing part is to have a tested (working) regular expression – Junior M Aug 17 '12 at 15:12
  • @JuniorMayhé, fair point, I changed the regex – Jodrell Aug 17 '12 at 15:35
  • @OliB, looked like a good edit to me. – Jodrell Oct 8 '13 at 9:40
4

I would use the following:

var ext = new string[] { ".ASPX", ".ASCX" };
FileInfo[] collection = (from fi in new DirectoryInfo(path).GetFiles()
                         where ext.Contains(fi.Extension.ToUpper())
                         select fi)
                         .ToArray();

EDIT: corrected due mismatch between Directory and DirectoryInfo

3

A more efficient way of getting files with the extensions ".aspx" and ".ascx" that avoids querying the file system several times and avoids returning a lot of undesired files, is to pre-filter the files by using an approximate search pattern and to refine the result afterwards:

var filteredFiles = Directory.GetFiles(path, "*.as?x")
    .Select(f => f.ToLowerInvariant())
    .Where(f => f.EndsWith("px") || f.EndsWith("cx"))
    .ToList();
3

The easy-to-remember, lazy and perhaps imperfect solution:

Directory.GetFiles(dir, "*.dll").Union(Directory.GetFiles(dir, "*.exe"))
2

I would try to specify something like

var searchPattern = "as?x";

it should work.

  • 1
    and return asmx too right? :) – naveen Aug 12 '11 at 11:55
  • Hah! I was afraid that aspx and ascx was too similar and would render a hack-solution like this. I want something general. – Seb Nilsson Aug 12 '11 at 12:07
2
    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the names of files in a specified directories that match the specified patterns using LINQ
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="srcDirs">The directories to seach</param>
    /// <param name="searchPatterns">the list of search patterns</param>
    /// <param name="searchOption"></param>
    /// <returns>The list of files that match the specified pattern</returns>
    public static string[] GetFilesUsingLINQ(string[] srcDirs,
         string[] searchPatterns,
         SearchOption searchOption = SearchOption.AllDirectories)
    {
        var r = from dir in srcDirs
                from searchPattern in searchPatterns
                from f in Directory.GetFiles(dir, searchPattern, searchOption)
                select f;

        return r.ToArray();
    }
2
    public static bool CheckFiles(string pathA, string pathB)
    {
        string[] extantionFormat = new string[] { ".war", ".pkg" };
        return CheckFiles(pathA, pathB, extantionFormat);
    }
    public static bool CheckFiles(string pathA, string pathB, string[] extantionFormat)
    {
        System.IO.DirectoryInfo dir1 = new System.IO.DirectoryInfo(pathA);
        System.IO.DirectoryInfo dir2 = new System.IO.DirectoryInfo(pathB);
        // Take a snapshot of the file system. list1/2 will contain only WAR or PKG 
        // files
        // fileInfosA will contain all of files under path directories 
        FileInfo[] fileInfosA = dir1.GetFiles("*.*", 
                              System.IO.SearchOption.AllDirectories);
        // list will contain all of files that have ..extantion[]  
        // Run on all extantion in extantion array and compare them by lower case to 
        // the file item extantion ...
        List<System.IO.FileInfo> list1 = (from extItem in extantionFormat
                                          from fileItem in fileInfosA
                                          where extItem.ToLower().Equals 
                                          (fileItem.Extension.ToLower())
                                          select fileItem).ToList();
        // Take a snapshot of the file system. list1/2 will contain only WAR or  
        // PKG files
        // fileInfosA will contain all of files under path directories 
        FileInfo[] fileInfosB = dir2.GetFiles("*.*", 
                                       System.IO.SearchOption.AllDirectories);
        // list will contain all of files that have ..extantion[]  
        // Run on all extantion in extantion array and compare them by lower case to 
        // the file item extantion ...
        List<System.IO.FileInfo> list2 = (from extItem in extantionFormat
                                          from fileItem in fileInfosB
                                          where extItem.ToLower().Equals            
                                          (fileItem.Extension.ToLower())
                                          select fileItem).ToList();
        FileCompare myFileCompare = new FileCompare();
        // This query determines whether the two folders contain 
        // identical file lists, based on the custom file comparer 
        // that is defined in the FileCompare class. 
        return list1.SequenceEqual(list2, myFileCompare);
    }
2

Instead of the EndsWith function, I would choose to use the Path.GetExtension() method instead. Here is the full example:

var filteredFiles = Directory.EnumerateFiles( path )
.Where(
    file => Path.GetExtension(file).Equals( ".aspx", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase ) ||
            Path.GetExtension(file).Equals( ".ascx", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase ) );

or:

var filteredFiles = Directory.EnumerateFiles(path)
.Where(
    file => string.Equals( Path.GetExtension(file), ".aspx", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase ) ||
            string.Equals( Path.GetExtension(file), ".ascx", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase ) );

(Use StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase if you care about performance: MSDN string comparisons)

1

look like this demo:

void Main()
{
    foreach(var f in GetFilesToProcess("c:\\", new[] {".xml", ".txt"}))
        Debug.WriteLine(f);
}
private static IEnumerable<string> GetFilesToProcess(string path, IEnumerable<string> extensions)
{
   return Directory.GetFiles(path, "*.*")
       .Where(f => extensions.Contains(Path.GetExtension(f).ToLower()));
}
  • 1
    You have Path.GetExtension which you can use. – jgauffin Nov 8 '13 at 12:49
0
var filtered = Directory.GetFiles(path)
    .Where(file => file.EndsWith("aspx", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) || file.EndsWith("ascx", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
    .ToList();
  • Add additional explanation for the code. It might help OP understand your answer better. – user2339071 Sep 9 '15 at 19:58
0

@Daniel B, thanks for the suggestion to write my own version of this function. It has the same behavior as Directory.GetFiles, but supports regex filtering.

string[] FindFiles(FolderBrowserDialog dialog, string pattern)
    {
        Regex regex = new Regex(pattern);

        List<string> files = new List<string>();
        var files=Directory.GetFiles(dialog.SelectedPath);
        for(int i = 0; i < files.Count(); i++)
        {
            bool found = regex.IsMatch(files[i]);
            if(found)
            {
                files.Add(files[i]);
            }
        }

        return files.ToArray();
    }

I found it useful, so I thought I'd share.

0

c# version of @qfactor77's answer. This is the best way without LINQ .

string[] wildcards= {"*.mp4", "*.jpg"};
ReadOnlyCollection<string> filePathCollection = FileSystem.GetFiles(dirPath, Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.SearchOption.SearchAllSubDirectories, wildcards);
string[] filePath=new string[filePathCollection.Count];
filePathCollection.CopyTo(filePath,0);

now return filePath string array. In the beginning you need

using Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;

also you need to add reference to Microsoft.VisualBasic

0

I did a simple way for seach as many extensions as you need, and with no ToLower(), RegEx, foreach...

List<String> myExtensions = new List<String>() { ".aspx", ".ascx", ".cs" }; // You can add as many extensions as you want.
DirectoryInfo myFolder = new DirectoryInfo(@"C:\FolderFoo");
SearchOption option = SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly; // Use SearchOption.AllDirectories for seach in all subfolders.
List<FileInfo> myFiles = myFolder.EnumerateFiles("*.*", option)
    .Where(file => myExtensions
    .Any(e => String.Compare(file.Extension, e, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, CompareOptions.IgnoreCase) == 0))
    .ToList();

Working on .Net Standard 2.0.

-2

Just would like to say that if you use FileIO.FileSystem.GetFiles instead of Directory.GetFiles, it will allow an array of wildcards.

For example:

Dim wildcards As String() = {"*.html", "*.zip"}
Dim ListFiles As List(Of String) = FileIO.FileSystem.GetFiles(directoryyouneed, FileIO.SearchOption.SearchTopLevelOnly, wildcards).ToList
  • Where does one acquire FileIO ? – Joel Martinez Jun 14 '17 at 14:51
  • 1
    It should be already included in your environment in Visual Studio (2015). It is part of Microsoft.VisualBasic namespace. In my case is VisualBasic because that's my language of choice. – qfactor77 Jun 16 '17 at 7:42

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