I want to get, given a character, its ASCII value.

For example, for the character a, I want to get 97, and vice versa.

up vote 390 down vote accepted

Use chr() and ord():

>>> chr(97)
'a'
>>> ord('a')
97
  • That doesn't work for code point of any substantial size. chr expects only 256 values. Try with U+400 and U+10FEEB. – tchrist Nov 2 '10 at 12:16
  • 7
    @tchrist: Try unichr() instead for Unicode characters docs.python.org/library/functions.html#unichr – Adam Rosenfield Nov 2 '10 at 17:24
  • @Adam, tried that: unichr(0x1D4E1) rebels with ValueError: unichr() arg not in range(0x10000) (narrow Python build). Perl doesn’t care whether you call chr() on 65, on 954, or on 0x1D4E1. Why does Python care? Is this a Python 2.7-vs-3.0 thing? Does 3.0 fix the Python's character model? Thanks! – tchrist Nov 2 '10 at 17:38
  • @tchrist: See wordaligned.org/articles/narrow-python – Adam Rosenfield Nov 2 '10 at 19:55
  • @Adam, thanks for that article. That’s really grim! I thought Java’s Unicode support was bad, but this is even worse! I’m afraid I in agreement with the author of the referenced article: it really is disappointing! You can’t control what kind of builds people have, so you can’t write programs that behave reliably on perfectly legal Unicode data. Doesn’t seem credible that ten years on, Perl is the only big language that truly supports full Unicode. I’m still looking for others. Unicode 3.0.1 came out back in August 2000, which is like so last millennium, you know? ☹ BIG SIGH – tchrist Nov 2 '10 at 20:32
>>> ord('a')
97
>>> chr(97)
'a'
  • what if I need to convert a pandas column from character to int? say['A','A','B','A'] to something like [1,1,2,1]? – Jason Goal Sep 10 at 11:53

The question has been answered but I think this reference is a good thing to keep note of. http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html

ord and chr

  • 24
    My favorite part about this answer is that they inadvertently wrote a valid line of Python. – ArtOfWarfare Jan 23 '16 at 22:31

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