1

I have an object whose constructor requires a primitive. I register it using a delegate (please excuse the contrived example).

container.Register<Account>(() => new Account(1000M), Lifestyle.Singleton);

I register this type Account as the implementation of an interface IAccount. When doing so using the call marked B below, SimpleInjector's .Verify() complains:

/* B */container.Register<IAccount, Account>(Lifestyle.Singleton);

The constructor of type Account contains parameter 'funds' of type decimal, which can not be used for constructor injection because it is a value type. (Parameter 'TImplementation')

Using the call marked A instead has no such issues and works as intended:

/* A */container.Register<IAccount>(() => container.GetInstance<Account>(), Lifestyle.Singleton);

I seem to have incorrectly assumed that A and B would be effectively equivalent. What have I missed? Why does B fail to utilise the registered delegate for creation of the Account instance? Thank you.

(File below is LINQPad (.linq) format)

<Query Kind="Program">
  <NuGetReference>SimpleInjector</NuGetReference>
  <Namespace>SimpleInjector</Namespace>
</Query>

void Main()
{
    var containerRegistry = new ContainerRegistry();
    Console.WriteLine("Balance = " + containerRegistry.GetInstance<Account>().Balance);
}

public class ContainerRegistry
{
    private readonly Container container = new Container();

    public ContainerRegistry()
    {
        container.Register<Account>(() => new Account(1000M), Lifestyle.Singleton);

        /* A */container.Register<IAccount>(() => container.GetInstance<Account>(), Lifestyle.Singleton);
        /* B */container.Register<IAccount, Account>(Lifestyle.Singleton);

        container.Verify();
    }
    
    [Obsolete] public TInstanceType GetInstance<TInstanceType>() where TInstanceType : class
        => container.GetInstance<TInstanceType>();
}

public class Account : IAccount
{
    public decimal Balance => funds;
    
    private readonly decimal funds;
    
    public Account(decimal funds)
    {
        this.funds = funds;
    }
}

public interface IAccount
{
    decimal Balance { get; }
}
7
  • What is the function of Account in yoyr application? Is it a class that contains behavior, or rather a domain entity? And what is fund? Is that a constant value or do you have many accounts with each a different value for fund?
    – Steven
    Dec 21, 2021 at 13:27
  • Hi @Steven. In reality, Account here is a service; the example is contrived just for brevity/simplicity. I have done a little research (saw your #246 issue in the SimpleInjector repo on GitHub) and have seen that the primitive ctor param can be solved in a few ways, and that while generally delegates should be avoided, they can be used in this scenario. I think I understand the complaint of .Verify() under normal circumstances; I just don't understand it here when I have told SimpleInjector how to instantiate the type in question, especially because the other .Register() invocation works.
    – TKF
    Dec 21, 2021 at 13:38
  • It would be good to use actual names and meanings in your post, because the right answer might depend on this.
    – Steven
    Dec 21, 2021 at 13:43
  • Can you describe what fund represents? Is this a runtime value that can change, or rather a value that stays constant while the application runs?
    – Steven
    Dec 21, 2021 at 13:45
  • funds, the ctor param, represents a value which initialises a quantity in the object that changes during runtime; put differently, funds itself does not change, but the quantity it initialises does. This differs from the code sample in the question (again for brevity).
    – TKF
    Dec 21, 2021 at 14:02

1 Answer 1

1

Try this:

container.Register<IAccount>(
    () => new Account(1000M),
    Lifestyle.Singleton);

A call to Register<T, R>() always applies auto-wiring (by design), which means that R is created by the container by calling its constructor. It will, therefore, not reuse the overload with the delegate. That's considered a different registration. That's simply how the API works.

3
  • Thanks @Steven. This works, but with my question, I had hoped to understand the issue better - as explained, the .Register call marked A already 'works' (even if, admittedly, it is not the idiomatic form). Why does Register<T, R>() fail to use a delegate already registered for the creation of R, when T is requested? Though your answer works and may be the idiomatic way to approach the problem with SimpleInjector, I still don't understand why the delegate is not used. Bug? Design limitation? Holding it wrong? Thanks a lot for taking the time to help me through this.
    – TKF
    Dec 22, 2021 at 3:32
  • 1
    A call to Register<T, R>() always applies auto-wiring (by design), which means that R is created by the container by calling its constructor. It will, therefore, not reuse the overload with the delegate. That's considered a different registration. What you are seeing is certainly not a bug, and I don't consider it a limitation. That's simply not how the API works.
    – Steven
    Dec 22, 2021 at 18:57
  • That's the info I needed - thanks again @Steven :) I also did not mean to imply a bug or undesirable limitation was at play - just enumerating possibilities to try and make my question and the info I was after a bit clearer. I was in fact holding it wrong.
    – TKF
    Dec 23, 2021 at 3:59

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.